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cntryboymc
03-22-2005, 10:01 AM
a customer of mine asked about planting some type of shrub or flowers beneath a large black walnut tree.i was worried about the shade,etc from the tree.any thoughts would be appreciated!

sheshovel
03-22-2005, 10:23 AM
Black Walnuts produce a poison from the roots that kills most plants beneath them.There might be a list of plants somewhere that are resistant to that but I do not know of one.

grasswhacker
03-22-2005, 10:34 AM
I know that Yucca plants will not have any problems under a walnut tree.

cntryboymc
03-22-2005, 10:08 PM
any more thoughts?

Grassmechanic
03-23-2005, 08:14 AM
any more thoughts?
I've had decent luck with hostas.

Coffeecraver
03-23-2005, 11:14 AM
The Black Walnut puts out toxins that kill plants around it The toxin is called Juglone.

Plants Sensitive to Juglone
Landscape plants:

black alder (Alnus);* azalea;
basswood; *white birches;
Hopa crabapple*; hackberry;
Amur honeysuckle;
Japanese larch;* lespedeza;
lilac;* saucer magnolia;
silver maple;* mountain laurel;
loblolly pine; *red pine;
scotch pine; *white pine;
potentilla;* privet;
rhododendron;* Norway spruce


Plants Tolerant of Juglone
Landscape plants:

red cedar;* crabapple;
elm;* winged euonymus;
forsythia;* hawthorn;
hemlock; *hickories;
black locust;* most maples;
oaks;* autumn olive;
pachysandra;* pawpaw;
persimmon;* wild rose;
sycamore;* most viburnums;
Virginia creeper

:)

sheshovel
03-23-2005, 11:38 AM
Thankyou for the information Coffeecraver,I will file it away for future use,I knew if I wrote I did not know of a list you would surely come up with one!!Thanks again

Garth
03-23-2005, 06:34 PM
[QUOTE=cntryboymc]a customer of mine asked about planting some type of shrub or flowers beneath a large black walnut tree.i was worried about the shade,etc from the tree.any thoughts would be appreciated![/QUOMany members of the walnut family (Juglandaceae) produce in their tissues a chemical called Juglone. Production is highest in black walnut (Juglans nigra) and butternut (Juglans cinerea), with members of the genus Carya producing minimal amounts. Juglone is an allelopathic substance, meaning it affects the growth of other plants. Susceptible plants growing in close proximity to black walnut or butternut may suffer growth stunting, wilt ("walnut wilt") and death. At the physiological level, juglone interrupts the metabolic processes of susceptible plants and causes their demise. This allelopathic reaction can make gardening in the midst of native or cultivated walnut trees very difficult. Of note, plants in the family Solanacea are very susceptable to juglone poisoning. These include tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, and eggplant. your local Cooperative Extension should be able to provide a list of resistant plants for your area.-Garth

sheshovel
03-25-2005, 07:43 PM
WOW!I'm impressed Garth very good informative info.

sheshovel

Garth
03-26-2005, 10:45 AM
Thanks, I worked my way through college working in botanical gardens, nurseries, orchid farms and such like. You pick up things. The chemical part really hit when I did a term-paper on randomly applified polymorphic DNA markers occuring in several varieties of Cytisus (Genista), the brooms. Apparently, California Indians used this plant to obtain "deep thought" and it was said to be mildly hallucinogenic. The chemical is related to nicotine, poisonous if consumed orally, but not if smoked. I see that I've begun blatthering so I'll stop. Sorry, I get excited when talking " plant stuff".

Grassmechanic
03-26-2005, 10:57 AM
Thanks, I worked my way through college working in botanical gardens, nurseries, orchid farms and such like. You pick up things. The chemical part really hit when I did a term-paper on randomly applified polymorphic DNA markers occuring in several varieties of Cytisus (Genista), the brooms. Apparently, California Indians used this plant to obtain "deep thought" and it was said to be mildly hallucinogenic. The chemical is related to nicotine, poisonous if consumed orally, but not if smoked. I see that I've begun blatthering so I'll stop. Sorry, I get excited when talking " plant stuff".
No, keep going, Garth! Much more informative that reading "my chevy is better than your dodge" or "my echo can whup your redmax" .

sheshovel
03-26-2005, 01:07 PM
OK tell me what is Alleopathic?And I hope you are into Landscaping or Horticultural part of this green industry and not just mowing.(no offence intended for the mowermen)

sheshovel
03-26-2005, 01:09 PM
Also I am in California,I'm going out to experiment with the native brooms right now!Ha Ha

Garth
03-26-2005, 11:08 PM
OK tell me what is Alleopathic?And I hope you are into Landscaping or Horticultural part of this green industry and not just mowing.(no offence intended for the mowermen)
Allelopathy is a chemical process that some plants use to keep competitors from moving into their space. There are several different forms of allelopathy. In one process, the plant that is allelopathic releases growth compounds from the roots into the soil like black walnut. New plants absorb these toxins and die. Another type releases compounds that inhibit or stop the process of photosynthesis. The three most common are:
Volatilization- Allelopathic trees release a chemical gas in small amounts through leaves to kill competitors.
Leaching- A plant loses leaves that store toxins. As they decompose on the ground, nearby plants absorb the poisons and die. Pine needles and Ailianthus are good examples.
Exudation- This is the release of toxin through roots such as walnut, wormwood, etc.
I tried to state it as simply as possible, but it still looks like alot of reading.
By the way, Cytisus or broom plants, the flowers were put in a jar and buried for two weeks. The flowers were then taken out and smoked. Deep, contemplative thinking and a heightened sense of colour were then experienced. The chemical is called cystine and it is a relative of nicotine. For God's sake don't eat ANY part of the plant. Gotta go build a fire outside so the wife and me can sit in the hot-tub and drink. So now that everything is tickety-boo, I'm going to bugger off. Cheers

sheshovel
03-28-2005, 03:22 PM
I was kidding I'm not about to smoke any wild things at my age.

Garth
03-28-2005, 06:35 PM
Very glad to hear it, wouldn't recommend it anyway. If you smoke too much, it's like being severely drunk without the hangover headache, but of course, your mouth still taste like the bottom of a birdcage.

sheshovel
03-29-2005, 01:48 PM
LOL at that one!

kkls2006
03-06-2007, 11:13 AM
The Black Walnut puts out toxins that kill plants around it The toxin is called Juglone.

Plants Sensitive to Juglone
Landscape plants:

black alder (Alnus);* azalea;
basswood; *white birches;
Hopa crabapple*; hackberry;
Amur honeysuckle;
Japanese larch;* lespedeza;
lilac;* saucer magnolia;
silver maple;* mountain laurel;
loblolly pine; *red pine;
scotch pine; *white pine;
potentilla;* privet;
rhododendron;* Norway spruce


Plants Tolerant of Juglone
Landscape plants:

red cedar;* crabapple;
elm;* winged euonymus;
forsythia;* hawthorn;
hemlock; *hickories;
black locust;* most maples;
oaks;* autumn olive;
pachysandra;* pawpaw;
persimmon;* wild rose;
sycamore;* most viburnums;
Virginia creeper

:)



Wow that was some serious use of the search feature but well worth it for the info... Thanx

mdvaden
03-06-2007, 12:08 PM
Those trees can be touchy to dig around sometimes.

Whatever you come up with, my suggestion is to go with smaller plants and let a year grow the rest.

Like 1 gallon rather than 3 gallon.

Like 2 gallon rather than 5 gallon.

Smaller root balls for smaller holes dug - less root damage.

northwest lawn
03-06-2007, 12:38 PM
you need plants that are juglans toxicity tolerant