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View Full Version : GVWR of f350 f250 and 2500 cummins dodge


CrewCutEnterprises
03-23-2005, 10:14 PM
ok guys.

I have a 250 99 gaser with a dump insert and the GVWR is 8800 lbs, well i regularly overload it by about 1000 lbs with mulch loads in the spring

I was looking at a f350 diesel

and a 2500

Does any one know the GVWR of either of these??

any other factors affect it?>

Smalltimer1
03-24-2005, 01:39 AM
The new '05 F-350 with the V-10 and automatic has a payload of 5800lbs. The diesel F-350 has a payload of 5700lbs.

CrewCutEnterprises
03-24-2005, 09:54 AM
Thanks,

any idea on the diesels for 99 and 00 I was looking into those.

Thanks alot though

Eclipse
03-24-2005, 02:54 PM
The 1999 and 2000 Dodge 2500 had a GWWR of 8800 lbs. If you have a 3500 GVWR is 10,500, and a 3500 Cab & Chassis is 15,000.

The Payload is an irrevelant number to a certain extent. You still cannot legally go over your GVWR.

For example: A Dodge Ram Cummins 2500, regular cab 4x4, weighs around 6500lbs. Add to that a driver, some tools, and a full tank of fuel and you are aproaching 7000lbs making your legal payload only 1,800lbs.

Smalltimer1
03-24-2005, 07:24 PM
The 1999 and 2000 Dodge 2500 had a GWWR of 8800 lbs. If you have a 3500 GVWR is 10,500, and a 3500 Cab & Chassis is 15,000.

The Payload is an irrevelant number to a certain extent. You still cannot legally go over your GVWR.

For example: A Dodge Ram Cummins 2500, regular cab 4x4, weighs around 6500lbs. Add to that a driver, some tools, and a full tank of fuel and you are aproaching 7000lbs making your legal payload only 1,800lbs.

Depends which state you're in. In some states you can register and tag your truck higher than your GVW/GCW and still be legal.

Eclipse
03-24-2005, 08:14 PM
Legal in the state as far as tags/registrations goes or legal in a Supreme Courthouse because you are exceeding the limits set forth by the manufacturer??????

lawncare3
03-24-2005, 08:47 PM
I think my 05 ram has 8800 GVW with a payload of 2750#

Gravel Rat
03-24-2005, 11:25 PM
Some people get in such a panic over legal payload its funny but you see people trying to pull a trailer that is way too heavy for the tow vehical and think nothing of it.

As for a 3/4 ton you can pretty much class the payload at max 2500lbs same goes with a srw 1 ton which is the exact same as a 250 but on paper it has a "higher gvw".

1 ton duallys is what is the load carrying trucks mainly the cab and chassis versions which are heavier than a dually P/U.

If you want true load carrying capacity then you have to go to F-450 and F-550 trucks that can carry a decent load ie 4 ton.

The biggest concern you should have is braking power if the truck can't stop with the load you shouldn't be carrying it. You can have a truck with heavy suspension etc and it can pack a big load but its got worthless brakes the truck is useless. Its like driving a 1/2 ton P/U with beefed up springs sure it can pack 2000lbs but it can't stop with that load.

Last thing to leave with ya never beleive the manufacturers listed payload ratings for the trucks. You need the real world ratings which is what your real tare weight is then subtact it from your gvw to get your legal payload.

If you keep your trucks tare weight down so that means not adding a bunch of goop to the truck like 400lb bumpers etc.

In this area you can increase you gvw up to what ever within reason but once the trucks licensed gvw gets above 12,000lbs its a commercial truck so you need to follow some of the commercial truck rules.

So a F-450 with a 15,000lb gvw has the same licensing and rules/regs as a 5 ton truck with a gvw of 35,000lbs. One exception is a 450 doesn't have to stick to truck routes but it does legally have to stop at the scales.

If your looking for a dump truck you should consider minimum 1 ton dually but a prefered truck would be a F-450. A srw truck will never beable to carry a decent load your biggest limit is tire capacity.

Smalltimer1
03-25-2005, 12:19 AM
Legal in the state as far as tags/registrations goes or legal in a Supreme Courthouse because you are exceeding the limits set forth by the manufacturer??????

Both, manufacturer's specs are recommended....not required.

Eclipse
04-07-2005, 12:35 AM
Both, manufacturer's specs are recommended....not required.

I'm not so certain I would trust your comments in regards to Michigan laws, but perhaps in other states that may be the case.

CrewCutEnterprises
04-07-2005, 01:05 AM
f250 is 8800 lbs
f350 is 9900 lbs

i have an ez dumper and it will hold 5 to 6 yards of mulch which is about 9600 lbs with my supercab gas motor.

For my next large truck, it will be a frieghtliner.

and in MD as long as u are under 26k, u are not required to have a cdl.

I do have DOT #'s though anyone else

StealthDT
04-07-2005, 11:55 PM
What was the question?

Just my opinion, but I'd suggest a GM 3500 over an F350. Why? Look at the depth of the C frame under the bed and the spring mounts. I had both 2004 4X4 models side by side today, you've got to see it for yourself.

Smalltimer1
04-08-2005, 10:50 AM
What was the question?

Just my opinion, but I'd suggest a GM 3500 over an F350. Why? Look at the depth of the C frame under the bed and the spring mounts. I had both 2004 4X4 models side by side today, you've got to see it for yourself.


The GM is a rolling death trap. There is no body support in the front end. The Ford has a substructure under the fenders that is nowhere to be found on any GM truck, not even a hint of protection. If you had a front collision in a Chevy it'd be totalled from the damage to the engine and front end alone.

The GM's frame is deeper, I'll give you that, but it is of thinner metal. The new F-350's frame is now like the old F-550's frame, much stronger than it was last year, and much stronger than the 3500's, which allows for the F-350's max payload of 5800lbs, as compared to GM's top rating of 5500. Also look at the parking brake cable on the GM, especially pay attention to the turnbuckle in the cable, its usually corroded/rusted pretty bad before it even leaves the lot.

Oldtimer
04-08-2005, 11:31 PM
The 2005 F250 & F350 use the same rear springs. The F350 has 2" longer shackles to allow for more spring sag or deflection. The '05 4WD has front coil springs allowing for a 5' tighter turning diameter plus it rides much better than leaf springs.

Oldtimer
'05 F250 SWB 4WD
CC 6.0 King Ranch

Smalltimer1
04-09-2005, 02:04 AM
The cab/chassis F-250/F-350 actually have higher capacity rear springs than the normal pickup. They do not advertise on those since they are not sold as normal pickups though. Not sure how much difference there is, but I know it is pretty significant.

CrewCutEnterprises
04-08-2006, 11:06 PM
I hate to bring up an old thread but.....

As some may know i bought the f350 and well I wanted more carrying capacity, I got a diesel motor in this truck and well, effectivly dident gain any thing but gas milage. I still weigh the truck to 9900 to even 11,000 lbs.

I did tittle it at the DMV for 12,000 lbs, She asked and I said, "REALLY" so i paid like 30 extra dollars and went from 9900 to 12,000, I hope it keeps DOT away.

Im looking into a 97 f250 hd, I was triing to find the dry weight and the gvwr so i can figure how much it would hold, thanks anyone