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View Full Version : Grubbs, how can I treat this myself?


PROCUTSLAWNCARE
03-28-2005, 04:57 PM
I know they make a grubb control you can spread in a fertilizer spreader, does this work, if not what can I do for this. A customer called today and was wodering if she needs to call chemlawn or can I do something for her.

Does the store bought stuff work or do I need to make a call to chemlawn???

Thanks

LB1234
03-28-2005, 05:08 PM
Ohio may require you to have a liscense for 'pesticide' applications...which is what you are looking for. Chances are if you are asking what to do then you don't have one...not sure what the law is in your state.

PROCUTSLAWNCARE
03-28-2005, 05:12 PM
I dont get into heavy ferts or pests. that often. I will throw down some scotts for a customer if they ask but I try not to get to involved with that. I am thinking of getting a lic. though?

any ideas for the grubbs?

LB1234
03-28-2005, 05:19 PM
Personally I subcontract out my fertilizer/pesticide services cause they have the liscense, insurance, and equipment to do the job. I don't agree with what you're doing...even if its just "for a customer that asks" but hey...its your business...

And yes, they sell stuff in homeripoff and blowes for grubs...comes in a granual form. I believe to be most effective you need to place it down in late summer (???)...something to do with when the beetles go back into the ground and lay there eggs...which turn into grubs...can someone confirm?

Mark McC
03-28-2005, 05:21 PM
There is some fairly standard grub control stuff all over the place. Shoot, you can get it at Lowe's if there's no Lesco place nearby.

For long-term treatment, you pretty much have to go with milky spore, but to knock the blighters down quick, you'll need something with imidacloprid. Maybe another chemical out there that'll work as well, I dunno. It's not a big deal.

slicksilverado01
03-28-2005, 06:54 PM
Well my lawn/landscape insurance covers dry fert and pest but doesnt cover liquid. I found that out just a few months ago. I also found out it covers for tree removel as long the tree is already on ground. I use to have 1/2 mill liability but this year I increased it to 1 mill cause half the commerical jobs I got this year require it.

lordohturf
03-28-2005, 09:29 PM
In Ohio you need a license to treat grubs or any other pest professionally. The info covered in the study material for the State Test covers grubworm seasonal changes and controls.
You run the risk of fines or at least a good wrist slapping if you get caught.

Also important, if you don't understand the problem, you will be less likely to know how and when and how much to control them. Merit or Mach 2 offer season long control of grubs if applied at the right time and the right rate.
In Northern Ohio you probably would be best off with a June application. If using Merit, make sure it is watered in with at least 1" of water with a few days of application for best results.

PROCUTSLAWNCARE
03-28-2005, 09:44 PM
Thanks guys,

My best bet it too just tell my cust. to call a lic. pro in the field and get it done right. I was just trying to help her out and keep all the work fairly cheap for her.

Thanks for the info....

Big Hoss
03-28-2005, 09:54 PM
You need to take the Core test and The Turfgrass test. Contact your local extension office or the Ohio Department of Agriculture.
Good Luck!
Big Hoss
Core
5,6a,6c,7,8

marko
03-29-2005, 08:55 AM
Call a pro! If she has grubs, they will come up for a minor feeding this spring, but rarely do damage. They will go back down and prepare for emergence later in the summer. The damaging feedings are in the fall and to control these, I have found Merit is the best. I would shy away from Chemlawn doing the applying as it is a pretty specific science and the timing is important. It needs to be watered in good, and lawn clippings are "suppose" to be left on the lawn for several weeks (not sure of the exact time frame). Application should go down no later than July 4th.

Chris Wagner
03-29-2005, 06:03 PM
I agree with the damage done in the spring time... it will be very minimal as the grass quickly recovers.

Watch out in the Fall time!! What type of grub is it? True white grub?

slicksilverado01
03-29-2005, 06:43 PM
Well my lawn/landscape insurance covers dry fert and pest but doesnt cover liquid. I found that out just a few months ago. I also found out it covers for tree removel as long the tree is already on ground. I use to have 1/2 mill liability but this year I increased it to 1 mill cause half the commerical jobs I got this year require it.

my bad I just checked with lawn/ landscape insurance again and in chemicals it covers only dry fert.

Garth
03-29-2005, 06:48 PM
White grubs are larva of several types of beetles, the most common of these being Popillia japonica Newman or Japanese Beetle. It was first discovered in a nursery in New Jersey 80 years ago and is now responsible for around 450 million dollars of damage annually. Imadacloprid, an ingredient in Merit has been available to professional applicators for several years for the control of grubs in turfgrass. It may take several applications between April and August to get a severe problem under control. There are other options available.Biological methods can be very successful in controlling grubs using parasites, nematodes, and fungi. Nematodes actively seek out grubs in the soil. These nematodes have a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with a single species of bacteria. Upon penetrating the grub, the nematode inoculates the grub with the bacteria. The bacteria reproduces quickly, feeding on the grubs tissue. The nematode then feeds on this bacteria and progresses through its own life cycle, reproducing and ultimately killing the grub. The two types of nematodes that are most effective on Japanese beetles are Steinnernema glaseri and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. The latter is commercially available.
Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a naturally occuring soil bacterium used as a microbial insecticide. The Bt strain registered for the Japanese beetle is for use on the grub stage only. I believe the strain is israeliensis.
Milky spore is the common name for the bacterium Bacillus popillae. This was first registered for use on beetle grubs in 1948. Upon ingestion, these spores germinate in the grub's gut, infect the gut cells, and enter the blood where they multiply. The build-up of spores in the blood causes the grub to take on the characteristic milky appearance. Milky spores build up in the turf slowly as the grubs ingest them, become infected, and die, each one releasing 1-2 billion spores back into the soil. It can take up to 4 years before total coverage is reached but it can cover a whole lot of area.
Parasites are showing excellent results but are not comercially available

Garth
03-29-2005, 07:02 PM
Sorry for the lesson. My Hort Professor was also an entomologist. Needless to say, you never went to his class AFTER lunch. Hell, sometimes he'd liberate my breakfast.

philk17088
03-29-2005, 07:47 PM
There is some fairly standard grub control stuff all over the place. Shoot, you can get it at Lowe's if there's no Lesco place nearby.

For long-term treatment, you pretty much have to go with milky spore, but to knock the blighters down quick, you'll need something with imidacloprid. Maybe another chemical out there that'll work as well, I dunno. It's not a big deal.
Whoa!
Imidacloprid won't touch the large feeding grubs. It works on emerging larvae.
Dylox will work on feeding larvae. Milky spore is a waste of time and money to a professional.

And you have to have a license for any treatment of any insect.

Garth
03-29-2005, 09:22 PM
A thousand pardons...I spelled "commercially" wrong. I was thinking faster than I could type. Scott's came out with a product that is supposed to be "The Next Generation In Grub Control" called Grub-X or something like it. I think it's bollocks myself. Probably same ol' chemical imadacloprid but you never know. I use Bti myself and have had excellent results though it's something that I won't use commercially. Most people go pale when you tell them your dousing their lawn with bacteria. They flash back to The Andromeda Strain.

SodKing
03-30-2005, 07:32 PM
Holly cow Garth..a spelling error!

We spray Bt on trees/shrubs for Gypsy Moth. I did not know you could use it on grubs....Frankly I haven't read the label since I last used it last year....As for Milky Spore, yes it is very effective on grubs, BUT it takes 4 years worth of applications of the product to make it so. Not quick enough for many people, but just right for some...

Garth
03-31-2005, 12:26 PM
Holly cow Garth..a spelling error!

We spray Bt on trees/shrubs for Gypsy Moth. I did not know you could use it on grubs....Frankly I haven't read the label since I last used it last year....As for Milky Spore, yes it is very effective on grubs, BUT it takes 4 years worth of applications of the product to make it so. Not quick enough for many people, but just right for some...
Please tell me it was sarcasm that you wrote "Holly" instead of "Holy". Otherwise, I'll now know why everyone's opinion of landscapers is that of uneducated prats who couldn't get a real job at gunpoint.

bcg
03-31-2005, 01:35 PM
When I've got customers with grubs, or any subterranean insect problem, we recommend a treatment of beneficial nematodes. They do a great job on the grubs and also control ants and any other bugs that spend a portion of their lifecycle in the soil. In addition to that, one application will typically last all season, they're cheap and they're biological so you don't need an applicator's license.

SodKing
03-31-2005, 03:13 PM
When I've got customers with grubs, or any subterranean insect problem, we recommend a treatment of beneficial nematodes. They do a great job on the grubs and also control ants and any other bugs that spend a portion of their lifecycle in the soil. In addition to that, one application will typically last all season, they're cheap and they're biological so you don't need an applicator's license.


You are completely wrong with your assumption that you do not need an applicators license. If it controls, repels, or mitigates a pest (weed, insect, rodent,fungi) it is considered a pesticide under Fifra. You therefore need a pesticide license to apply it for hire.