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packerbacker
04-05-2005, 05:12 PM
Im doing an install on one and this is my first time doing it so I need some help with something.


The drain is going to be running from the corner of the yard directly down a hill. Im putting the basin in the corner of the yard. Trenching a line all the way down the hill, putting gravel down, laying the pipe in and putting gravel on top. Im stopping about halfway down to "tee" on to a gutter.

The question I have is where does the drain pipe stop? Does the hose need to go all the way to the street, which would be under a sidewalk or can it be buried and the water soaks in once it goes down the line stopping before the sidewalk?

Thanks in advance.

Popper357
04-06-2005, 01:52 AM
Personally, I don't see why you would put gravel under and on top of a drain pipe used in this case. Gravel is used to keep the water flowing into a french drain or perforated pipe, and you wouldn't use perf pipe on a decent slope since water is directed already. Sounds like your installing a drain to move water out of a low spot or out of downspouts, right?

Trying to get a solution for you about where to end the drain and how. I don't think draining under or near a sidewalk is appealing. Wouldn't that focus lots of extra water underneath the concrete sidewalk? I would get the water to the top of the slope and let it run down naturally, forget the trench. Water won't cause a big probem on the slope, especially compared to water focused or pooling on concrete. It's hard to say what to do. Need to know how much water you are moving and what the topography is. Let us know how this turns out.

packerbacker
04-06-2005, 08:42 AM
Personally, I don't see why you would put gravel under and on top of a drain pipe used in this case. Gravel is used to keep the water flowing into a french drain or perforated pipe, and you wouldn't use perf pipe on a decent slope since water is directed already. Sounds like your installing a drain to move water out of a low spot or out of downspouts, right?

Trying to get a solution for you about where to end the drain and how. I don't think draining under or near a sidewalk is appealing. Wouldn't that focus lots of extra water underneath the concrete sidewalk? I would get the water to the top of the slope and let it run down naturally, forget the trench. Water won't cause a big probem on the slope, especially compared to water focused or pooling on concrete. It's hard to say what to do. Need to know how much water you are moving and what the topography is. Let us know how this turns out.





Basically the backyard is a hill and most of the water collects in the corner of the yard. The ground then levels off for about 15-20 feet and the starts to run downhill again in the front yard.

I was going to put the drain in the corner of the yard and run all the water down the front yard.

It wont run naturally because of the 15-20 feet its got to go to get from one slope to the next and its collecting under the fence and starting to rot the fence boards.

I can take some pics if Im not being clear enough. Im not that good at describing things.

As far as the gravel goes... like i said, this is my first time and I have done some studying and everything I have seen says to use gravel below and on top.

scraper69
04-06-2005, 08:52 AM
Use hardpipe and run it into a swale ( bed of pea gravel)

packerbacker
04-06-2005, 09:25 AM
Whats the difference between using hard and the flexible? And what do you mean run it into a bed of pea gravel? Where would I put that bed?

NickN
04-06-2005, 10:10 AM
If you're simply moving water away from one area to another,there is no need for the gravel.You can use solid corrugated pipe,no sock,no soil seperator fabric,no gravel.If you're running the water from one area to another,plus letting any residual water seep into the drain,then you'll need all of the above.(This would be if you have a long area that is collecting water,where one basin won't take care of it all.)
Now,with that said,you want to run your pipe to the surface to discharge the water.If I'm picturing this area correctly,I'd install the basin at the low spot(where the water is collecting)trench the 15-20 feet(?) across the flat area(at a slight slope of 1" per 10-12 feet).I would then discharge the water out the second "slope".(Of course connecting your tee to the drain along the way).At the end of the pipe(discharge),install a grate to keep critters and leaves,etc.,, out.If you're using a 4" pipe,just attach a 4" round grate with tap screws,so that the homeowner can remove it for any cleanout that me needed down the road.

packerbacker
04-06-2005, 10:18 AM
If you're simply moving water away from one area to another,there is no need for the gravel.You can use solid corrugated pipe,no sock,no soil seperator fabric,no gravel.If you're running the water from one area to another,plus letting any residual water seep into the drain,then you'll need all of the above.(This would be if you have a long area that is collecting water,where one basin won't take care of it all.)
Now,with that said,you want to run your pipe to the surface to discharge the water.If I'm picturing this area correctly,I'd install the basin at the low spot(where the water is collecting)trench the 15-20 feet(?) across the flat area(at a slight slope of 1" per 10-12 feet).I would then discharge the water out the second "slope".(Of course connecting your tee to the drain along the way).At the end of the pipe(discharge),install a grate to keep critters and leaves,etc.,, out.If you're using a 4" pipe,just attach a 4" round grate with tap screws,so that the homeowner can remove it for any cleanout that me needed down the road.






Got it! One question though.

So you WOULNDT run the line all the way down the second slope? Just let it drain down the 2nd slope naturally?

NickN
04-06-2005, 10:25 AM
Exactly.Gravity is your friend.:D
Unless there is going to be ALOT of water under pressure,run it out the side of the second slope.Water under pressure will wash away some soil.To be safe,you can install a splash guard at that area(Like the one used for downspouts).I wouldn't worry about it though.Doesn't sound like you have too much water to move at one time.
I did an install that has 5 downspouts all coming together across a drive.The roof pitch is about 8/12.That's alot of water in a short time.The water runs across the drive turnaround,into the basin,and down the slope,discharging nicely.:D

packerbacker
04-06-2005, 10:28 AM
Cool, thanks for the help!

This is my first drain job and its relatively small. I really dont want to muck it up.


Thanks for the help.

NickN
04-06-2005, 10:43 AM
You're quite welcome.I don't really like drainange jobs,but they are good money makers.Low cost for materials,but most homeowners can't or don't want to do it and larger companies don't want to hassel with it.Charge accordingly.