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Gene $immons
04-08-2005, 12:45 AM
A very good employee asked if he could borrow a 21" mower and weedeater and blower to do some lawns over the weekend that he somehow has lined up.

What do you say?

promower
04-08-2005, 12:47 AM
I say you go buy a reel mower, lend that out when employees need to borrow a mower. Few hours pushing that around and I doubt they will line up anymore weekend work. If hes a good employee I would consider lending out a 21" Although it would be kind of funny if he had to go back to his customers and tell them he didnt own a mower or trimmer :o

Green Pastures
04-08-2005, 12:48 AM
Do Not Loan Your Tools.

Ever.

MMLawn
04-08-2005, 12:48 AM
If they were lawns in your service area, esp if he may have "lined them up" during working hours or is worse....now your comp.....well to put it in Trumpsters words....."You're Fired!"

gotgreen?
04-08-2005, 12:51 AM
I am a solo but if I was in that situation I will say no. If he wants to mow on the side and you don't have a don't compete clause, he needs to do it with his own equipment.

sbvfd592
04-08-2005, 12:58 AM
it depends are u a big company are u happy with what u bring in if so yes help out he will only think of u as a better man and boss if you arnt then i would say no

tonygreek
04-08-2005, 12:59 AM
absolutely not. you have no way of knowing if they're customers poached during working hours or some other method that impacts your bottom line. and then there's the equipment wear 'n tear, and liability concerns.

note to promower:
my neighbors love the irony that i spend the bulk of my days dealing with some form of power equipment or another, but typically mow my own lawn with a reel mower. nothing beats the sound and lack of grass juice on my bare feet. as a joke, i just bought another scott's classic that a custom paint shop owning friend of mine is going to trick out. ;)

rodfather
04-08-2005, 08:37 AM
A one weekend deal? Probably since he's a very good employee. Every weekend? Not a chance.

Petr51488
04-08-2005, 08:48 AM
Ask him if u can borrow him for the weekend to work free of charge. Then lend it to him. lol

DGM
04-08-2005, 08:53 AM
Things like that can turn a good situation into something bad. Are you willing to eat the cost if something goes wrong to keep him as a good employee?

That will eventually lead to trouble. If you say yes on the first time you can surly bet that there will be a second, third, etc. Just nip it in the bud now and say Sorry No and your reasons.

Kickin Your Grass
04-08-2005, 08:58 AM
A very good employee asked if he could borrow a 21" mower and weedeater and blower to do some lawns over the weekend that he somehow has lined up.

What do you say?


(He wants to borrow your equipment) to do the lawns that he picked up while working for you..............

CamLand
04-08-2005, 09:02 AM
I say he uses his paycheck and go but his own...

Gene $immons
04-08-2005, 09:06 AM
I don't believe that he picked up the lawns while working on my clock. I think they are some neighbors of his, (other side of town)

I will let him do it one time, since I already opened up my mouth and told him that it would be OK. I will also tell him first time, and last time.

I want to help him since he is an excellent worker, and has a new baby at home.

I'm mostly worried about theft of the equipment on his watch.

Oldtimer
04-09-2005, 12:03 AM
Don't hold back! Let the employee use a pickup and a full trailer too. He can get a lot more done with the right equipment. All employees who have arrangements like this will really take great care of everything and on Monday morning you won't have to worry about whether or not your equipment is ready to go. Oh, I almost forgot, make sure he has enough money to fill the truck and mowers. A really concerned employer will furnish the employee with a credit card.

Another thing to consider is that the employee really likes mowing so much that he wants to do it seven days a week. Don't get in the way of his enjoyment.

Don't worry about theft but if things disappear they can be quickly redeemed from the pawn shop closest to the employee's residence. He will probably give up the tickets without protest unless he is still high.

Cobra Jock
04-09-2005, 12:24 AM
I've had a lot of people work for me, but I must say that they don't sound like any on these posts. I would let him, borrow it. Remember, it's a lawn mower. I guess some people didn't learn too much after 9-11. It's a lawn mower! That's why some people never get and keep good employees. Although I would never ask to borrow an employer's mower, I would let them borrow mine. Remember, lawn mower= 10,000, Good Employee= priceless!

Greg

nelbuts
04-09-2005, 12:25 AM
If they want to do their own yard then I let them use the equipment. If they are moving I even help them move. But if they are doing the side work don't alk to me.

tjgray
04-09-2005, 12:42 AM
Our main sub-contractor never has a problem with letting us borrow equipment if we need it, sending us referrals, giving us old equipment that he doesn't use, or letting us purchase chemicals at cost from him.....*but then my husband works hard for him and makes him lots of money and he is not threatened by us*

Gene you said he is a good employee with a new baby right? The only issue I would have in helping him is like you said the theft or damage possibility *we have our own insurance for those types of situations unlike an employee*. Talk with him and find out where he plans on storing the mower. Make sure it is secure.

Also I would advise him if he is going to start doing lawns to make sure he gets himself insured.

I mean you did say he is a good employee with a new baby right? Have we become such an industry of cut-throat, lowballing, customer stealing black hearts that we can't help out those that have helped us/need help? :(

leeslawncare
04-09-2005, 12:47 AM
Ask him if u can borrow him for the weekend to work free of charge. Then lend it to him. lol


I agree with you !!! next thing you know he screws you over !!!

ALarsh
04-09-2005, 12:49 AM
If you are worried about theft, make him pick it up in the morning and return it at the end of the day.

jwl5510
04-09-2005, 12:53 AM
How can you call him a good man when he did not refer the accounts to your service I would suspend him for 3 days then see if he wants to take any further business from the hand that feeds him.

Brianj
04-09-2005, 12:53 AM
if he is a good employee let him, in our business,, our employees cant have 2 much on the ball or they will leave soon and start thier own business, so we must balance that ,maybe u could give me 50 bucks for evey yr arounf yard he gets u

StealthDT
04-09-2005, 01:07 AM
He can borrow my wife, just don't bring her back!

Todd's lawncare
04-09-2005, 01:48 AM
I've had a lot of people work for me, but I must say that they don't sound like any on these posts. I would let him, borrow it. Remember, it's a lawn mower. I guess some people didn't learn too much after 9-11. It's a lawn mower! That's why some people never get and keep good employees. Although I would never ask to borrow an employer's mower, I would let them borrow mine. Remember, lawn mower= 10,000, Good Employee= priceless!

Greg
Well hey let me get you truck and mower for the next 6 weeks plezzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz dont for get the C/C thanks

Olylawnboy
04-09-2005, 02:15 AM
When I was an employee, a long time ago, I asked my boss to use some equipment to do some family and freinds places and sure I made a few bucks on the side. But in no way would it hurt my employer at the time as these folks could never afford our service. But I enjoyed (and still do) making thier little place on the earth look like just as nice as any place I do. I think it's just fun!.....

i_plant_art
04-09-2005, 02:44 AM
rule of thumb for me is never ever ever let anyone use my tools , not even the neighbors. if they fix it do you think they will pay to fix it... ha ha yeah right, esp when they see the bill. the use it incorrectly, for things not intneded, and just dont take good care of things while they have them. ive made some neighbors made before by not letting them use my stuff.... im my opinion they should just hire us and be done with it.... would your insurance cover the loss if it were damaged, or stolen while you let someone borrow your stuff.... i doubt it.......rule of thumb never ever let anyone use your stuff

Cobra Jock
04-09-2005, 09:22 AM
Well hey let me get you truck and mower for the next 6 weeks plezzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz dont for get the C/C thanks

I'll let you borrow it, but you have to bring it back from P.A. at the end of every day! HeHeHeHe :D Look, the only thing I was trying to tell Gene is, only he knows how good the employee is and if he needs some help. help him out. Like tjgray said in her post, when did we become so hard-hearted that we can't help out our fellow humans. I guess I'm in a different financial situation than some. I mean, if he breaks it, I go and get it fixed. It isn't like Walker quit making used parts all of a sudden! I guess if some peoples mowers break, they go out of business! Don't forget to figure in the cost of maintenance when bidding those jobs payup

Greg

JustUsDe
04-09-2005, 09:46 AM
Our main sub-contractor never has a problem with letting us borrow equipment if we need it, sending us referrals, giving us old equipment that he doesn't use, or letting us purchase chemicals at cost from him.....*but then my husband works hard for him and makes him lots of money and he is not threatened by us*

Gene you said he is a good employee with a new baby right? The only issue I would have in helping him is like you said the theft or damage possibility *we have our own insurance for those types of situations unlike an employee*. Talk with him and find out where he plans on storing the mower. Make sure it is secure.

Also I would advise him if he is going to start doing lawns to make sure he gets himself insured.

I mean you did say he is a good employee with a new baby right? Have we become such an industry of cut-throat, lowballing, customer stealing black hearts that we can't help out those that have helped us/need help? :(
I am glad to see not everyone on this site is heartless and cold. I agree with you we have to help those who have worked hard to make our business what it is. I am new to this site but not new to running a company and if most of you run your companies like you say you do on this site you will never have the loyal employees it takes to have a great business. I have to pieces of heavy equipment loaned out this weekend to 2 different great employees who are doing side work. I don't feel they are stealing work from me because the people they are doing the work for couldnt afford my pricing and so I would never get the job anyway. Nor would I want to do the jobs in the first place.
Now with that said I am not saying its a a good ideal to let it happen on a regular bases. I also say not all employees deserve these little perks. My dad always said you dont need to treat all employees equally but treat them all fairly.

Ray

Cobra Jock
04-09-2005, 11:29 AM
I am glad to see not everyone on this site is heartless and cold. I agree with you we have to help those who have worked hard to make our business what it is. I am new to this site but not new to running a company and if most of you run your companies like you say you do on this site you will never have the loyal employees it takes to have a great business. I have to pieces of heavy equipment loaned out this weekend to 2 different great employees who are doing side work. I don't feel they are stealing work from me because the people they are doing the work for couldnt afford my pricing and so I would never get the job anyway. Nor would I want to do the jobs in the first place.
Now with that said I am not saying its a a good ideal to let it happen on a regular bases. I also say not all employees deserve these little perks. My dad always said you dont need to treat all employees equally but treat them all fairly.

Ray

Well said! Some people have probably never had a good employee, so they don't know what they are missing!

ChadA
04-09-2005, 12:05 PM
Thats a hard one there. On one hand if he's a good employee you want to help him out. Especially how hard I hear it is to find and keep good employees.
On the other hand, it's seems no matter how trust worthy and how responsible a person is they just don't take good care of something when it's not theirs.

tjgray
04-09-2005, 01:42 PM
On the other hand, it's seems no matter how trust worthy and how responsible a person is they just don't take good care of something when it's not theirs.

That maybe true for some but we treat loaned equipment no different from our own....in fact we are a little more careful with it knowing it is not ours.

If you want loyal hardworking employees then you have to make them feel like they are a part. You have to lead by example and show faith and trust in your employees. I would not make loaning out equipment a weekly habit but every once in awhile to help a good, loyal, employee make some extra cash to support his family I see no problem with.

When my husband was employed by our now sub-contractor our vehicle broke down.....the next day we had the work truck sitting in the driveway. These kind of acts in the right type of person can only lead to loyalty and appreciation. Kindness always re-pays kindness and what comes around goes around *or so I like to think*

Now I know when you trust their is always the potential of getting burned....trust me I have had my share but I refuse to allow the bad experiences to keep me from finding/having the good :)

And JustUsDe I am only heartless and cold when it comes to illegal and in-experienced chemical applications and cruelty to animals, elderly, and children. Get on any of those topics and watch me turn into the monster :angry:

Q-Team Inc
04-09-2005, 03:11 PM
No moonlighting for our company. If someone needs to do work at there own house thats fine. Or even at a friends or family members. We trust people with our equipment but we do not want to be in the position of liability issues etc. and our name being seen on things that we really didn't do.

lampeslawnservice
04-09-2005, 03:21 PM
Sure you can borrow the mower, if I can borrow your truck for the same weekend.

lawnrangeralaska
04-09-2005, 03:58 PM
i would never let them know my prices for all my lawns.. never teach a employee about pricing. i would let him borrow my backup curve trimmer and a older 21" bagging mower. and handheld blower thats it.

Gene $immons
04-09-2005, 07:05 PM
UPDATE

I let him take a mower, edger, weedeater & blower home yesterday.

He brought them back to me by 9:00 AM this morning, he was finished already.

No theft or dammage.

He was very thankful. BTW, this is a Hispanic worker. I wonder how many white boys would be SO eager to work EXTRA....not many.

YardPro
04-09-2005, 09:02 PM
we let our good ones borrow our stuff to mow THIER lawns, but not for money....

if he were a really good employee, i would consider it for a one time deal, but i would tell him to use the money he makes this time to buy a cheap mower for next time.

lampeslawnservice
04-09-2005, 10:14 PM
How about for every client he gets you, you let him mow it and pay him $2 or 3 bucks extra each time he mow it. Just a thought, then it would be a win win situation.

CWG
04-09-2005, 10:18 PM
How about for every client he gets you, you let him mow it and pay him $2 or 3 bucks extra each time he mow it. Just a thought, then it would be a win win situation.

Now you're thinking!

ALarsh
04-09-2005, 10:19 PM
How about for every client he gets you, you let him mow it and pay him $2 or 3 bucks extra each time he mow it. Just a thought, then it would be a win win situation.

Why would he even tell you for $2-3 when he could mow it by himself and get a lot more money?

Soupy
04-09-2005, 10:35 PM
Your just helping one more scrub make a few dollars on the weekend. At least most scrubs have to buy their own equipment even if they don't have all the other overhead that most of us do. But your guy has everyone beat. He gets free equipment on top of no insurance, taxes etc. Your lucky he doesn't have to bill them or he might want a couple of envelopes and paper too.

He might not have taken any work from you, but he took the opportunity from another legitimate business that would have been willing to work on that street.

lawnprosteveo
04-09-2005, 10:37 PM
I would say no way buddy! Tell him to save up and start his own biz with his own equip.

The Captain
04-10-2005, 12:15 AM
Q-Team brought up the biggest reason not to loan out your equipment. The reason is "LIABILITY'. Theft of your stuff, damge to the equipment, lost or stolen customers.....penny-anty stuff. Wait until some harda** gets the urge to sue your freelancing employee and his lawyer third partys you because your equipment was used. You may be looking to borrow a mower by the time it's all said and done. Be a nice guy, a reponsible employer, but don't be a fool.

Jim

Todd's lawncare
04-10-2005, 12:32 AM
I'll let you borrow it, but you have to bring it back from P.A. at the end of every day! HeHeHeHe :D Look, the only thing I was trying to tell Gene is, only he knows how good the employee is and if he needs some help. help him out. Like tjgray said in her post, when did we become so hard-hearted that we can't help out our fellow humans. I guess I'm in a different financial situation than some. I mean, if he breaks it, I go and get it fixed. It isn't like Walker quit making used parts all of a sudden! I guess if some peoples mowers break, they go out of business! Don't forget to figure in the cost of maintenance when bidding those jobs payup

Greg
Are you letting me get the C/C for gas to if so that will be fine !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
like a good friend said one hand washes the others back ! He's a roofer and does siding and all that stuff . I know he don't work for me but you get my point ? When i was looking for work when i was slow about 4 years ago and one of the jobs i was looking in to said FREE ! use of company equipment for personal use only but still he has ALOT of money in to his set up ill get pic's some time . The only thing i wont let my guy's use is my truck !!!

Todd's lawncare
04-10-2005, 12:35 AM
Q-Team brought up the biggest reason not to loan out your equipment. The reason is "LIABILITY'. Theft of your stuff, damge to the equipment, lost or stolen customers.....penny-anty stuff. Wait until some harda** gets the urge to sue your freelancing employee and his lawyer third partys you because your equipment was used. You may be looking to borrow a mower by the time it's all said and done. Be a nice guy, a reponsible employer, but don't be a fool.

Jim
A new car dealers let some of there guys take cars for personal use what if they hit someone or something do they go after all the party's involved ?
Hows the weather out there i use to live out side St.l ?

Gene $immons
04-10-2005, 10:57 AM
Your just helping one more scrub make a few dollars on the weekend. At least most scrubs have to buy their own equipment even if they don't have all the other overhead that most of us do. But your guy has everyone beat. He gets free equipment on top of no insurance, taxes etc. Your lucky he doesn't have to bill them or he might want a couple of envelopes and paper too.

He might not have taken any work from you, but he took the opportunity from another legitimate business that would have been willing to work on that street.


I don't consider my employee a "scrub" and don't appreciate the comment. I asked for some input on this, and as usual, it turns into a scrub debate. I am glad that I let him borrow the stuff.

coastallandscapesolutions
04-10-2005, 11:14 AM
A very good employee asked if he could borrow a 21" mower and weedeater and blower to do some lawns over the weekend that he somehow has lined up.

What do you say?


In his dreams..... I would tell them to go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy their own equipment. I am not in the business to furnish my equipment to mow someone else's yard. Here in SC if something happened while my employee (off hours) using my equipment damaged or hurt someone/thing then I would still be in the hook for the liability. It is more of a legal issue.

lawncarepros2004
04-10-2005, 11:57 AM
your kidding right? maybe you can let him borrow your client list too.

vharrison2
04-10-2005, 12:16 PM
:cool2: How can you call him a good man when he did not refer the accounts to your service I would suspend him for 3 days then see if he wants to take any further business from the hand that feeds him.

Right? The guy is taking what could potentially be your client. We have a no compete clause that chaps some of guys arss but we are running a business.

Oldtimer
04-10-2005, 12:45 PM
Business is business. It's kind of like the wash boy at Avis or Hertz driving a car home for the weekend because he is a good worker. Believe me, he ain't never gonna be that good. Rent a Wreck, maybe.

Oldtimer

Gene $immons
04-10-2005, 12:48 PM
I guess its hard to make people understand the full scenario.

Employee, who works his AZZ off for me wants to make an extra $50.00 bucks. He needs a FAVOR.

GEE I HOPE HE HURRYS AND PAYS THE GOVERNMENT RIGHT AWAY.

Some of you are real jerks.

I would not want the lawns he mowed anyway. I have higher standards than a $25.00 one time mow job.

Oldtimer
04-10-2005, 01:05 PM
One time mows are usually the worst for equipment. If he hits something and bends a crankshaft, who pays. It certainly won't be the one timer because he doesn't have any money to start with.

Give the guy a raise, a cash baby gift and a couple of boxes of pampers, Then, find him a good used mower that is a different brand from your mowers.

I'm not trying to make a jokes. I'm serious about the best way to take care of the employee and limiting your liability. One foreign object thrown in the wrong place by a mower could cause a lot of grief for the mower's owner.


Oldtimer

ProLandscapes
04-10-2005, 02:57 PM
Gene,

I am a very hard working White Boy and have been since I was a kid! Don't start your BS This isn't reverse racism it's pure racism towards White European Americans and I won't put up with that crap I have white and hispanic workers right now. I don't know where you live but they work the same here. I would love to have this debate in person.

edited, watch your language.jodi
JT

UPDATE

I let him take a mower, edger, weedeater & blower home yesterday.

He brought them back to me by 9:00 AM this morning, he was finished already.

No theft or dammage.

He was very thankful. BTW, this is a Hispanic worker. I wonder how many white boys would be SO eager to work EXTRA....not many.

tjgray
04-10-2005, 03:14 PM
I was going to say the same Gene only nicer......there are a whole lot of hard working white boys out there just as many as any other race I dare to say BUT I think you made the right decision by letting your dedicated, hardworking *now he is even more so* employee borrow the mower :)

I know there is the liability issue to consider....all I can say is I am sure glad our subbie had enough trust and faith in us to not be so fearful of the worse....we wouldn't be where we are today without him and we show that appreciation by working our hardest to make him and us both money :waving:

Oldtimer
04-10-2005, 04:33 PM
Why does the H2B program limit out so quickly? I guess it's to allow other people to get jobs.

Oldtimer

Creative Lawn Care
04-10-2005, 04:42 PM
Personally I admire anyone that is hardworking and trying to better themselves. I do however find it very hard to loan out my equipment since I have to have it to make a living. I believe if this guy is a complete no threat to your business, a good employee and can do his work off hours, that I would buy a cheaper 21" a homelite weedeater and handheld blower and let him pay you back at $25 a week or so. MOst of us here have been blessed and it wont hurt us to help others out some.

Soupy
04-10-2005, 10:11 PM
I don't consider my employee a "scrub" and don't appreciate the comment. I asked for some input on this, and as usual, it turns into a scrub debate. I am glad that I let him borrow the stuff.

What is your definition of a scrub? Mi definition is a guy that cuts grass for extra money and doesn't run a real business. No matter if you wanted the jobs or not, somebody would have taken them. Don't tell me that they are not worth cutting at $25, because they are only that price because the Scrubs settle for that price. The customer does not set the prices, but the scrubs do.

Your employee might be a great guy and very hard worker, but that doesn't change the facts.

To answer your question, NO I would not have lend him any equipment. For more reason then I explained. Furthermore, My comments were not an attack on you (I have no problem with you) or your employee, but simply pointing out that you helped further a problem that haunts our industry everyday. If you look at it from outside the box you might understand were my comments came from.