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Up North
05-06-2005, 10:00 PM
Sorry for being lazy and not searching this topic as I think it was discussed last season. But I thought I read somewhere that if you store trimmer line in water it keeps from getting brittle. Is this true? I was using some leftover line from last year and it didn't seem to last near as long as it did last year. Plus it was splitting, and it never did that for me last year. Fortunately I don't have too much left and at this rate I'll be out buying some new stuff real soon.

Anyway, am I correct in seeing something about keeping the line in water and it stays fresher longer?

Buck

Appalachian landscape
05-06-2005, 10:16 PM
My old employer told me this was true. I have no first hand experiance with it though.

Tomt
05-06-2005, 10:19 PM
I was told the that it would. I tried it. I use cut pieces in a quick load head. I cut about 100 pieces and stored them in wet paper towels in a plastic bag for about 2-3 weeks. I was using .095 Echo cross fire line.
Results; The string didn't split at the end, it just broke off at the head. That got old fast. After about a week or two the breaking stopped and the line did seem to last longer.
Don't know if I will go through that again, don't think the improvement was worth the effort. :dizzy: :waving:

turfmaster90
05-06-2005, 10:36 PM
Yes it will last longer. During the summer the sun bakes the moisture right out of trimmer line. I take mine off the holder and put it in a bucket of water during the winter. I put a brick on top of the spool to keep it beneath the water. When summer rolls around the line is very plyable just like a brand new line :cool2: .

Up North
05-06-2005, 10:41 PM
I was told the that it would. I tried it. I use cut pieces in a quick load head. I cut about 100 pieces and stored them in wet paper towels in a plastic bag for about 2-3 weeks. I was using .095 Echo cross fire line.
Results; The string didn't split at the end, it just broke off at the head. That got old fast. After about a week or two the breaking stopped and the line did seem to last longer.
Don't know if I will go through that again, don't think the improvement was worth the effort. :dizzy: :waving:


Tomt,
I use the same head, Rapid Loader I think it's called. Using the same line also, have had very good results with that line. I've seen where some use the Husky Titanium line and they seem to like it, maybe I'll get some of both and give them a try.

Buck

sheshovel
05-06-2005, 10:52 PM
I tried the water thing and my line was nice and plyable but it also got mushy and diden't last as long in heavy weeds.

Lux Lawn
05-06-2005, 10:53 PM
Thats news to me I have never heard of anyone doing that before.

dvmcmrhp52
05-06-2005, 11:20 PM
Having spent 15 years in the plastics industry I can say this..........Trimmer line by nature of its ploymer makeup will absorb water and dry out over time. Dry trimmer line will be more brittle..............

We used to ship certain products after molding, in plastic bags and add a cup of water to be absorbed during shipping..............one of the products? Endoscopic tubes for surgical purposes..........

supper_slash
05-07-2005, 12:48 AM
Having spent 15 years in the plastics industry I can say this..........Trimmer line by nature of its ploymer makeup will absorb water and dry out over time. Dry trimmer line will be more brittle..............

We used to ship certain products after molding, in plastic bags and add a cup of water to be absorbed during shipping..............one of the products? Endoscopic tubes for surgical purposes..........


Yes i am also in the plastics industry and water dose help the line from "drying" up, but what will real make it soft is plasticizer ("plas·ti·ciz·er : Any of various substances added to plastics or other materials to make or keep them soft or pliable.") :blob3:

Like "Armor All®" :p something that you might us to keep your dash nice and shinny in the summer, and help keep it from "cracking" and "drying out", now i now that you can make it too soft, so you might need to try it out a little to get the time worked out ok, but the watter dose too things, 1. it keeps the string frome drying out and 2. it keeps it cool. that is two of three of the best things that you can do to keep plastics for a long time, the number 3 thin is 3. UV blocker. the worst thing is the sun. so that is why you might wont to try "Armor All®" payup or any thing that has "plasticizer" on the label cheep. maby this will help. P.S. most of the string is made out of PVC witch is in the poly family, but IS different.. :rolleyes:

Triple R
05-07-2005, 01:18 AM
I have a 5 pound spool from years ago which I started using the few months and haven't had any problems with line breaking and I have used it to cut weeds over 3 feet tall.

TheKingNJ
05-07-2005, 01:57 AM
umm i dont think i've ever had a problem with trimmer line drying out, if it does, i haven't noticed.

Littleriver1
05-07-2005, 07:14 AM
I think some of us go past the sign post that said extreme. I think you should only buy what you will use in a reasonable amount of time and keep it out of sun light. Keeping it cool is realitave and draging around a container of water would be a pita. I say, stop worrying about the mule and load the wagon.

grass_cuttin_fool
05-07-2005, 10:20 AM
I figure the sun does more harm to the line than anything else, I never saw an advantage to having a big spool of line on a trailer in the sun, I precut 2 spools worth on the weekend and put them in the tool box for the up coming week

dkeisala
05-07-2005, 01:03 PM
Having spent 15 years in the plastics industry I can say this..........Trimmer line by nature of its ploymer makeup will absorb water and dry out over time. Dry trimmer line will be more brittle..............

We used to ship certain products after molding, in plastic bags and add a cup of water to be absorbed during shipping..............one of the products? Endoscopic tubes for surgical purposes..........

Very interesting...you answered my question before I even asked it. You don't think of plastic absorbing water but I suppose it makes perfect sense considering the polymer make up.

Up North
05-07-2005, 02:14 PM
Wow, didn't know we had chemists on lawnsite!! :D I'll probably go buy some new line then dunk the leftover stuff in some water for later use. I really don't want to make something simple as trimmer line a PITA...got enough stuff like that already... :D

Thanks guys!

Buck

sheshovel
05-07-2005, 02:58 PM
I usualy use mine up in a season so don't have alot of extra around anyway.Mabey I just left the line in the water for too long that time I think it was in there for 3 months or so and the plastic or pvc sluffed off the surface of the line into my hand in a mush type of stuff.

Oldtimer
05-07-2005, 04:33 PM
It takes about a week for trimmer line to completely absorb it's maximum amount of water. We have several customers who always store their line in water and praise the results.

Oldtimer

Likestomow
05-07-2005, 06:38 PM
I'm just fininishing up the last of 9 - 5# rolls bought four years ago. It is .105 Stens. I store mine cut to 25' lengths, in a 5 gallon bucket of water with a little shot of dish detergent (surfactant). It is nice and pliable. Without the water bath, the line is very brittle.

desert rose gardening
05-09-2005, 12:48 AM
I have heard of that before, in my case I don't have time to run tests on trimmer line. Whats the point? Just don't buy a 12 pack some night and you will be able to afford another spool of trimmer line!

SOMM
05-09-2005, 01:12 AM
we're with post # 10 on our 5 lb spools of Grass Chain black .130 run through 33CC redmaxes. zero degradation of this superior .130 product over the past 2 seasons. it shreads bottles, cans, critters, and we especially use it for acres of ivy beds.

dvmcmrhp52
05-10-2005, 08:10 PM
P.S. most of the string is made out of PVC witch is in the poly family, but IS different.. :rolleyes:





Most trimmer line is Nylon based with varying additives per manufacturer. Hence the moisture absorbency................

dvmcmrhp52
05-10-2005, 08:14 PM
Very interesting...you answered my question before I even asked it. You don't think of plastic absorbing water but I suppose it makes perfect sense considering the polymer make up.



Some plastics are very unstable due to absorbtion of moisture while other are very stable due to virtually no moisture related effects...............

The plastics industry has come a long way since Phenolics were first introduced................

GreenUtah
05-11-2005, 03:13 PM
I'm guessing the question you really need to ask when you consider trim line is, how much do you think typically breaks off while you trim a property with say, chain link fence around the border? How much would that be over the course of a season? Two? Where is all that line on the property? Did you pick it all up? I'm not seeing layers of trim line everywhere I've been. So, it must break down, right? In fact, it does, with exposure to air and sunlight, dries out, shrivels up and turns to whatever sized pieces as your mower hits it the next however many times. This is also what makes it brittle sitting on a trailer spool or in the back of a truck. We ran 95 and 105 line, bought it on 5 lb spools and each shop kept it in a 5 gal bucket of water, fully submersed. Each morning, as crews would load, their trim man would pull out 10-12 foot long sections, cut and coil for the day ahead. Keep a few in pocket and a few in the truck for even the nastiest trim jobs. Storing them in water led to lower use of trim line overall, faster production from trim workers and even fewer bump heads, all tracked over multiple seasons in multiple areas in the western us with all kinds of different conditions. Keep it fresh and pliable, save time and money. How much is dependent on how heavy your usage is, weigh the benefits as it applies to your situation.

PS..the one drawback we did encounter with storing it in open 5's, water tends to get pretty nasty if you don't change it out every so often..lol