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Russ
02-20-2001, 07:04 AM
Any of you guys been in the Master Gardner Program at your local University? Just finished my first day and doing my homework. Wondering if anybody else has done it, and what they thought of it?

HOMER
02-20-2001, 07:11 AM
I have a customer that went and she loved it. She gave me the info on it but I haven't signed up yet. She went last year and said it was very informative.

Keep us posted.

turfcat75
02-20-2001, 08:37 AM
What is a master gardner program?

Russ
02-20-2001, 10:53 AM
Master Gardener program is a Horticulture course offered by the land grant University extension office of the state. It offers instruction in 17 areas ie. plant problems, landscape design, plant science, veg & flower gardening ect. The fee for the course is nominal, but you have to do 50 hours of community service(free), and your not allowed to refer to yourself as a Purdue Master Gardener in your for hire business. I have a lot to learn, so I'm taking the Program.

Runner
02-20-2001, 02:44 PM
I completed it, and it was EXCELLENT! Ours was offered through our local Cooperative Extension Service which is through Michigan State University (I always cringe when I get to that part!) Part of the community service (it ALL has to be horticulture related) is to help answer the horticulture hotline at the C.E.S.. Very informative. The sad thing is, is that alot of people (citizens don't even know what the C.E.S. is, or that such a wonderful, absolutely free service exists. There is so much free information and brochures, not to mention the help is free. About the only thing you pay for is soil analysis tests. But that's well worth it as you get a computer printout of all your soil readings, contents, and percentages. They, then of course, advise you on what's beneficial to amend to your soil to solve your problems or improve your results.

slabpile
02-20-2001, 05:37 PM
I work for a school district and have one of these "master gardiner" students that will be doing her volenteer time with me. hope it is as good as you all say. so far i know more than her, and i have not gone too school. but i will always take free labor!

Scapegoat
07-26-2005, 01:24 PM
I just completed the Master Gardener program thru the University of Florida. It was EXCELLENT. I learned alot. It's also nice because I now have access to and get updates from the horticulture dept of the University before anyone else. I also have access to all kinds of plant and pest ID books and references, plus all the knowledge of current and past Master Gardeners.

For $140 you can't go wrong. I also have to volunteer at the extension office for 75 hours, but I enjoy that cause that's where all the books are! :D

Quikcut
07-26-2005, 05:43 PM
Wow I was just considering signing up myself. I visited the zoo and the local program planted one of the gardens that made me instantly interested. Keep us posted on how it goes and hopefully I'll be joining the ranks of the Master Gardeners soon. :blob3:

Quikcut
07-26-2005, 05:47 PM
For Tennessee folk
http://mastergardeners.tennessee.edu/

bugspit
07-26-2005, 06:24 PM
For Tennessee folk
http://mastergardeners.tennessee.edu/

great program, and like most who work in the dirt, great people too. :drinkup:

Kate Butler
07-26-2005, 07:16 PM
If I were to become a Master Gardener I could not advertise the fact and would have to perform large amounts of free work at a site approximately 50 miles from my place of business. Where is the upside??

This is one of my pet "hot button" issues. If MG's are do do community service for free, then let those of us in rural places answer the bloody questions online - not at the regional university. I have a young woman working for me who is a Master Gardener. She is constantly asking questions regarding plants or bugs that her program did not prepare her for.

You will get out of the program (according to her) what you need for your own use. The rest is in one ear and out the other (again, according to her).

I'm not maligning the program, I think it's a GREAT idea with some VERY serious implementation problems.

I also believe that there should be a "professional" level of MG that we COULD use in our advertising. It would indicate a more thorough knowledge than the homeowner course.

bugspit
07-26-2005, 07:51 PM
If I were to become a Master Gardener I could not advertise the fact and would have to perform large amounts of free work at a site approximately 50 miles from my place of business. Where is the upside??

This is one of my pet "hot button" issues. If MG's are do do community service for free, then let those of us in rural places answer the bloody questions online - not at the regional university. I have a young woman working for me who is a Master Gardener. She is constantly asking questions regarding plants or bugs that her program did not prepare her for.

You will get out of the program (according to her) what you need for your own use. The rest is in one ear and out the other (again, according to her).

I'm not maligning the program, I think it's a GREAT idea with some VERY serious implementation problems.

I also believe that there should be a "professional" level of MG that we COULD use in our advertising. It would indicate a more thorough knowledge than the homeowner course.

If want a more "professional" education your local college can help you with that. The MG program as I know it is for, as you stated, for homeowners, enthusiast, for people who like to volunteer their services to others and be involved in community improvement projects. There are many "freebies" so to say , that come with being a volunteer MG, these freebies are the upside IMO.

bugspit
07-26-2005, 07:52 PM
[QUOTE=Kate Butler]If I were to become a Master Gardener I could not advertise the fact and would have to perform large amounts of free work at a site approximately 50 miles from my place of business. Where is the upside??

This is one of my pet "hot button" issues. If MG's are do do community service for free, then let those of us in rural places answer the bloody questions online - not at the regional university. I have a young woman working for me who is a Master Gardener. She is constantly asking questions regarding plants or bugs that her program did not prepare her for.

You will get out of the program (according to her) what you need for your own use. The rest is in one ear and out the other (again, according to her).

I'm not maligning the program, I think it's a GREAT idea with some VERY serious implementation problems.

I also believe that there should be a "professional" level of MG that we COULD use in our advertising. It would indicate a more thorough knowledge than the homeowner course.[QUOTE]


If you want a more "professional" education your local college can help you with that. The MG program as I know it is for, as you stated, for homeowners, enthusiast, for people who like to volunteer their services to others and be involved in community improvement projects. There are many "freebies" so to say , that come with being a volunteer MG, these freebies are the upside IMO.

ProMo
07-27-2005, 08:11 AM
I have done well as a master gardener this year, I mow for a fellow mg in a gated community I otherwise couldnt have gotten into, was hired by bayer to consult at lowes stores in the winter wich paid good with an even better completion bonus , and though I cant advertise it my existing customers can and do.

Runner
07-28-2005, 03:26 AM
If someone got nothing out of it, it was weither the instructor(s), or the individual themselves. Just like anything, you get out what you put in. My instructor was great, and she still IS a great help.
As far as someone not knowing something about a particular insect or disease, or something, the MG courses are not meant as a doctorate. One thing we ARE taught, is that if you don't have an answer for someone's particular question or needs, you HAVE THE RESOURCES.

arborist-28
07-29-2005, 08:23 AM
master gardener is an awesome course I would definately encourage you to go for it ...c

arborist-28
07-29-2005, 08:25 AM
I didn' know you couldn't refer to it in for hire business .. I know a few guys that advertise that they are "master Gardeners" lol ... c

arborist-28
07-29-2005, 08:32 AM
kate you've made an interesting point there your comments made a lot of sense to me.. the term master gardener doesn't always mean that you know more then most about gardening .. it is basically a short course taken to earn the title.. I can see why you would be upset ..I think that your Idea of having different levels of the master gardener would help distinguish between a home owner who went and took the course @ a local university and a horticultural professional that has devoted his or her life to working with plants .. c

Ric
07-29-2005, 09:10 AM
Master Gardener Program must vary from place to place. I know the program in my area is very poor from the results I have seen.

First: I have been on many estimates where the Homeowner had called the Master Gardener program for advise. The Mis-information is large. I will say that giving advise over the phone with out seeing the problem is very hard to do correctly and this is what master Gardeners in my area do.


Second: Several years ago I was called for an estimate to cut grass only. When I got to the property I could see a multitude of problems before even getting out of my truck. I tried my best to kindly point out these many problems to the customer and tried to up sell pesticide service. She stated she was a Master Gardener and had full control over her yard and had no problems. She got my goat at that point and I started playing her, by pointing out multiply insect, fungus and fertilization problems all tongue in cheek. Once in the back yard I spotted grub damage and told her. While telling me Once again how much she knew and I didn't about Horticulture she slipped on the grub area turf and fell to the ground as the turf peeled up to reveal a good 7 grubs per sq ft feeding activity. Before I even offered to help her up I reached down and scooped up and hand full of grubs and Said " Since you don't have grubs these are interesting looking earth worms." Needly to say I didn't get the job.