PDA

View Full Version : Landscapers in my area should be ashamed.


tinman
05-31-2005, 09:34 PM
I go to a property today to do a 1 time mow. Maybe the nicest subdivision in the county now (up to $500 K homes). I figured the yard would be a piece of cake ...smooth & all. Not like a lot of new lawns I service, in which the backyard is just seeded with rye grass & some fescue thrown out onto the roughest ground you can imagine. Well it was worse. Sodded front was OK, but the back had piles of rock, concrete chunks, boards, etc just laying all around in the grass. & the far back had ruts like at a tractor pull. Unreal. I know these builders set a tight budget on everything including the lawn, but at least the landscapers could smooth it out & not leave it un-mowable (if that is even a word. :) )
These people who buy these homes should at least look at what is in their back yard b4 closing on a home.

sheshovel
05-31-2005, 10:07 PM
Hey poor Landscapers are the last ones to see the money!!They are the last step people take to complete the new home and last one they take to get ready to sell the old one.Before us the building contractor,plumber,electricians,roofers,drywallers,and cement guys have taken all they can get then we are up for the last of the last dregs of the homeowners money they might have left after that. That's why you see these hundredthousand dollar home's sitting there with one little tree in front,or a few scraggly plants.
I know what you are speaking of though.It's the contractors responsibility to make sure that stuff is cleaned up for sure!!

tinman
05-31-2005, 10:18 PM
I can't beleive the homeowners do not notice these things. But this lady did not have a clue. She said there was one "high spot in the back" . No joke it was 4 ft. high....needs bushhogging. I've mowed some nasty stuff b4 but nothing close to that high. I just left her a note on the bill telling her to get someone out to bushhog that part.

Grass Masters
05-31-2005, 10:20 PM
Home owners do see it but dont care all they care about is getting moved in and figure taht the Lawn Guys can straighten it out

grassmanvt
05-31-2005, 10:31 PM
I go to a property today to do a 1 time mow. Maybe the nicest subdivision in the county now (up to $500 K homes). I figured the yard would be a piece of cake ...smooth & all. Not like a lot of new lawns I service, in which the backyard is just seeded with rye grass & some fescue thrown out onto the roughest ground you can imagine. Well it was worse. Sodded front was OK, but the back had piles of rock, concrete chunks, boards, etc just laying all around in the grass. & the far back had ruts like at a tractor pull. Unreal. I know these builders set a tight budget on everything including the lawn, but at least the landscapers could smooth it out & not leave it un-mowable (if that is even a word. :) )
These people who buy these homes should at least look at what is in their back yard b4 closing on a home.

I had worked for a local historical society a few years back before they had their own maintenance guy. They had just redone this building, probably spent a mil plus, had equipment on site all one summer, still managed to do a hack job on the lawn. A couple old stumps were left, when I first mowed I had to pick rocks and rebar, and the front that had been "landscaped" was just horrible, four inch strips of grass between beds (mow with trimmer then blow out bed), no mower access to some areas, grass growing out of mulch about as quick as it was layed down, but, they did manage to install a decent walkway.

South Florida Lawns
05-31-2005, 10:48 PM
The people that haul off the building debris and do the major grade work for the builder. I know when my parents place was built in 96 the builder just buried all this crap in our yard, it was unbelievable.

kilpatrickshrub&turf
05-31-2005, 10:58 PM
Been my experience the dirtwork/gradework is the responsibility of the contractor before the landscape crews arrive to bid on the job. Hey,,, im still owed for the last tractor work i did, better call him tomorrow.

dvmcmrhp52
05-31-2005, 11:30 PM
Landscapers have little to do with new lawns in new subdivisions, At least around here.
The contractors have a half azzed grading job done and the spray rig comes in..............Rocks? Oh, you want them removed???????? :p

impactlandscaping
05-31-2005, 11:49 PM
Yards like that are very common around here. The places go up so quickly, and the builder wants to turn them over to realtors as fast as possible. We did a 2.5 acre site 2 weeks ago, and halfway around the back of 2 finished units, the soil wasn't prepped any further on the unfinished units. They told us when we called it was spray ready, so I called the developer to make sure. He said it was as ready as it was going to get(pending completion of the units, then a final renovation will be done), and to go ahead and spray everything that was contracted. Basically a third or so was just for erosion control until they finish construction. I dropped by today to check on everything, and I've got nice grass coming in everywhere, but they already tore up several place with trucks, and ripped up a 250' strip with the dozer getting the road prepped for asphalt. We will be spraying about one third or so of it again this fall after the new units are completed, so I don't really care. This is one of the few builders I have worked with who actually cares about the lawns and landscaping, and is trying to maintain stormwater management on his site. Most of the other builders would never re do the areas after completion...at least around here

Scag48
06-01-2005, 12:46 AM
We've dealt with this before, as far as landscaping goes. We pick and choose which builders we'll work for. Some of them want it now, now, now and cheap, cheap, CHEAP! We won't do shoddy work and put our name on it so we just tell the builder we're busy and pass it along to some lowball joe, happens all the time.

ChadA
06-01-2005, 12:49 AM
I know what you mean. I had my house built last July and you wouldn't believe some of the stuff I've dug up. Massive branches, Boulders, pavers, beer bottles, 2x4's a pile of nails all kinds of crap. they don't care. Turn em and burn em i guess.

Precision
06-01-2005, 11:39 AM
I know what you mean. I had my house built last July and you wouldn't believe some of the stuff I've dug up. Massive branches, Boulders, pavers, beer bottles, 2x4's a pile of nails all kinds of crap. they don't care. Turn em and burn em i guess.

Around here that is illegal. They get fined and have to fix it. I think the fines for burying debris start at $5000.

They used to be able to bury all the trees and other organic debris on site, but then houses started to sink and split foundations as the organic matter rotted and compressed. A few companies went out of business because of homeowner lawsuits. Now no buried stuff. All has to be removed organic or not.

mbricker
06-01-2005, 12:47 PM
Same problems with new lawns in this area as some here have mentioned:

The problem is that new home buyers are incredibly uninformed consumers when it comes to the lawn around their new 400 grand home. When I learned to lay sod, about 9 years ago, there were still some standards most crews held to. Now it's all immigrant crews whose only instruction is "Throw it down and get to the next job." On EVERY new lawn in many developments, I see sod thrown over pieces of sheetrock and lumber, over smashed 2-liter soda bottles, over water meters, etc. In many cases the lawn doesn't even get topsoil spread over the fill and rubble, it is just semi-graded and sodded. The guy on the skid-steer rips in with the pallets of sod, the pallet pushes up a ridge of dirt-rubble-whatever as the operator drops it, then the sod gets thrown right over that little ridge.

The utility people are equally uncaring. I see phone cable laid on the dirt/ future lawn, and the sod thrown over it. That is all the bury the cable will ever get. And the irrigation installers are rarely co-ordinated with either the sod crews or the utility people. I've seen trenchers going across sod that was put down the day before and just dragging up the strips. And when the irrigation people are gone, the poor back filling settles into the trenches that are never re-filled.

I tell the homeowner that the lawn is rough and the quality of mowing will suffer, and they basically look at me with a "Deal with it--that's your problem" attitude.

It's been about 5 years since I did my last sod job. I gave a few bids since then, but the response was, "Look we know you do good work, but you are two grand higher than this other guy. What's the deal? It's just sod, it's not rocket science." Then I'm back looking at an extremely rough, but green, lawn a few months later, and sometimes I've actually had people point to the lawn with pride and show how "good" a job they got for much less money than I quoted. Of course some have also pointed to the scalped spots and mower scallops and tell me their current mowing service just doesn't know how to do a good job, and would I give them a quote? But of course my quote is "too high--it's just mowing, not rocket science!"

And don't even let me start on the irrigation installs!

I'm looking, but I'm still not finding new developments here, where the lawn install quality is determined by anything other than low bid!

Precision
06-02-2005, 07:16 PM
The worst thing around here is that we have a stupid law that each property must retain all of its own roof run off. So the builders are building little dams around the property edges. Think concrete speed bumps in parking lots. That is the width and usually about twice as high.

They can not be cut with a mower, not even a 21" without major scalping.

DUMB, Dumb, dumb.

But most of the homeowners don't know or care that it looks like crap, that the sod falls off or dies due to being elevated.

Stupid politicians. Make the builders plan for drainage for the entire neighborhood not for each house. Whats next, personal retention ponds on .18 acre lots?

ProCare Lawn Service
06-03-2005, 08:57 PM
I use to do a lot of landscaping and sod work. It would pi$$ me off to no end on the amount of scap the construction crews would leave in the yard and bury 1 ft. below ground. It would never fail that I would either hit a pile of bricks or boards when trying to plant tree or shrubs. :angry:

Envy Lawn Service
06-03-2005, 10:42 PM
Look guys, I've been in ALL aspects of business being discussed here. I did literal 'ground-up' to 'turn-key' totally finished sites. All work from the ground breaking until the key was turned, all done in-house if you will.

These are my opinions:

To begin with, VERY FEW people really have what it takes for grading work. Then even fewer have what it takes for 'finish grading' a property. You have to have the natural eye for it. I've come to the conclusion this is a gift that either you are born with, or you're not. I'm conviced in that belief because for one, it seems to be a skill you cannot teach, and secondly I've found that it does seem to be an inherited trait.

That in a nutshell covers a very large percentage of all the different finish grade problems we encounter in the field day-in day-out.

As for the rest of the stuff, like buried debris, damaged areas, poorly executed work, ect... Well, there are scrubs in every field, and on top of that, you would be surprised what some will do to get back on schedule or to cut corners to turn a profit.

ed2hess
06-03-2005, 11:12 PM
Very Very poor landscaping here on one of our new commericial properties. The grade got tore up by the irrigation guys and the trenches sank so we got these "dips and hills" everywhere. The sod iwas not rolled flat and there was trash/rock/retaining felt everywhere across the back part of the property. The property manager seemed shocked when we told him he needed to get contractor back on site. The contractor called us and met with us. After walking the property he said give me an estimate to straighten this out and we charge it back to the landscaping guy.