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Fareway Lawncare
06-03-2005, 11:18 PM
Grandmother Proves Rake and Broom as Fast as Leaf Blowers
(January 8, 1998 press release from Zero Air Pollution, Los Angeles)

In fighting the ban on gas powered leaf blowers gardeners have argued that it would take them twice as long to do jobs if they had to use rakes and brooms. But Diane Wolfberg, a Palisadian grandmother in her late 50s, proved them wrong in tests conducted by the Department of Water & Power Leafblower Task Force last Thursday.

In three tests involving gas powered leaf blowers and battery powered leaf blowers, Diane cleaned the areas using rakes or brooms faster than any of the battery powered blowers and almost as fast as the gas powered leaf blowers and she did a better job in cleaning up the areas.

The Task Force, formed at the direction of the Los Angeles City Council, is composed of two representatives from the gardeners' associations and one representative each from the landscape contractors association, the dealers, DWP, the Department of Parks and Recreation, General Services, the City Council, and the homeowners. It is evaluating electrical alternatives to the gas powered leaf blowers. When it was proposed that the electrical equipment be tested against gas powered leaf blowers which would be the baseline for comparison, the homeowner representative, Jack Allen, also of the Palisades, suggested that rakes and brooms be included in the comparison.

Wolfberg, who like Allen, is a member of Zero Air Pollution (ZAP), volunteered. In the first test, which required each participant to clean a pebbled cement patio area approximately 100 square feet in size with eight chairs placed on the patio, diminutive Wolfberg cleaned the area in two minutes and 30 seconds. The gas powered leaf blower operated by a large, well muscled gardener cleaned the area in two minutes but like all the leaf blowers, did not clean the area of small nuts or leaf stems, something Wolfberg was able to do.

In a second test involving the moving of paper cups and wadded paper down a 50 foot slope and back up again, she was as fast as the gas powered leaf blower and faster than the electric blowers. In the third test, requiring the cleaning of a heavy bed of pine needles and dirt down a thirty foot concrete ramp, she was the fastest and the cleanest. The leaf blowers all sent columns of damp dirt flying into the air as much as five or six feet.

Wolfberg's performance did not impress the gardeners but did impress others who had been convinced that using rakes and brooms was not feasible. The representative from DWP told Wolfberg that she had won him over.

Jason Rose
06-03-2005, 11:35 PM
Hummm, if everyones landscaping was constructed of smooth concrete with no obstructions and leaves were dry paper products then I could see the light here. But where's the reality here? I can sling a bushel load of pine needles 50 feet with a rake too on concrete. But put a few dozen shrubs and some rock edging in there and see how well the lady fares then against the "awful" blowers.

These tests are a joke... The gardner couldn't compete with the lady with a rake, couldn't remove small nuts and leaf stems??? HUH? what was he using anyways? Cause I want one of those powerful badboys! Must be the redmax 8000 or whatever, you know, the one that can move a brick on pavement. Any blower I have owned does a better and cleaner and more efficient job than any broom or rake.

Aleman
06-03-2005, 11:36 PM
I guess they need to take those blowers back to Wal-Mart and get their money back!

Fareway Lawncare
06-03-2005, 11:45 PM
A More Fair Test...

I Would have Put Granny w/her Stupid Broom on One of My Mow&Blow Crews that Service 25-30 Props per Day and Told Her that after She Trims She has to have The Debris Blown off the Drive before Mowing is Done or She Gets a the Back End of a Broom on her Azz.

After the Second Lawn Granny Would be Either in the Hospital suffering a Heart Attack or if She's a Tough Granny She'd Be Strapped into a Redmax 8000.

Jason Rose
06-03-2005, 11:50 PM
I Would have Put Granny w/her Stupid Broom on One of My Mow&Blow Crews that Service 25-30 Props per Day


No No No, it's not "mow and Blow" Call it , Mow and "gently caress that clippings off the paved surfaces with a gentle spring-like breeze" See, that sounds so sweet and nice now. I'm not offended at all now. LOL

Scapegoat
06-04-2005, 12:04 AM
Grandmother Proves Rake and Broom as Fast as Leaf Blowers
(January 8, 1998 press release from Zero Air Pollution, Los Angeles)

In fighting the ban on gas powered leaf blowers gardeners have argued that it would take them twice as long to do jobs if they had to use rakes and brooms. But Diane Wolfberg, a Palisadian grandmother in her late 50s, proved them wrong in tests conducted by the Department of Water & Power Leafblower Task Force last Thursday.

In three tests involving gas powered leaf blowers and battery powered leaf blowers, Diane cleaned the areas using rakes or brooms faster than any of the battery powered blowers and almost as fast as the gas powered leaf blowers and she did a better job in cleaning up the areas.

The Task Force, formed at the direction of the Los Angeles City Council, is composed of two representatives from the gardeners' associations and one representative each from the landscape contractors association, the dealers, DWP, the Department of Parks and Recreation, General Services, the City Council, and the homeowners. It is evaluating electrical alternatives to the gas powered leaf blowers. When it was proposed that the electrical equipment be tested against gas powered leaf blowers which would be the baseline for comparison, the homeowner representative, Jack Allen, also of the Palisades, suggested that rakes and brooms be included in the comparison.

Wolfberg, who like Allen, is a member of Zero Air Pollution (ZAP), volunteered. In the first test, which required each participant to clean a pebbled cement patio area approximately 100 square feet in size with eight chairs placed on the patio, diminutive Wolfberg cleaned the area in two minutes and 30 seconds. The gas powered leaf blower operated by a large, well muscled gardener cleaned the area in two minutes but like all the leaf blowers, did not clean the area of small nuts or leaf stems, something Wolfberg was able to do.

In a second test involving the moving of paper cups and wadded paper down a 50 foot slope and back up again, she was as fast as the gas powered leaf blower and faster than the electric blowers. In the third test, requiring the cleaning of a heavy bed of pine needles and dirt down a thirty foot concrete ramp, she was the fastest and the cleanest. The leaf blowers all sent columns of damp dirt flying into the air as much as five or six feet.

Wolfberg's performance did not impress the gardeners but did impress others who had been convinced that using rakes and brooms was not feasible. The representative from DWP told Wolfberg that she had won him over.

Obviously a gas powerd leaf blower in most situations will be quicker, but really the point of this "test" had nothing to do with speed or efficiency. It was really a way to promote more environmentally friendly ideas and practices. Cutting down on pollution caused by gas powered blowers. Probably was intended more for the homeowner. I'm sure they don't assume time crunching LCO's would care.

qualitylandscaping
06-04-2005, 01:24 AM
2 minutes to clean off a 100sqft patio??? Give me a break.. Maybe 10 seconds maximum if you are using a pro. grade blower..

I wouldn't know what to do if a ban like that went into effect here.. :dizzy:

Richard Martin
06-04-2005, 05:50 AM
I have a customer with 20,000 feet (20 X 1,000) of asphalt driveway plus 200 feet of 4 foot sidewalk. Get busy Granny. I'll drop you off on Monday and pick you up on Friday.

Lnd Svyr
06-04-2005, 10:37 AM
Remember, Californians are just plain different. Look at any product you buy these days. "This product is known to the State of California to be...." I'm in Virginia, why should I care? Heinlein was right. California will eventually just split off from the rest of the good ole USA and, thankfully, they'll be doing us all a favor.

DLCS
06-04-2005, 11:34 AM
Remember, Californians are just plain different. Look at any product you buy these days. "This product is known to the State of California to be...." I'm in Virginia, why should I care? Heinlein was right. California will eventually just split off from the rest of the good ole USA and, thankfully, they'll be doing us all a favor.



The granola state, cause your either a fruit, nut, or a flake. :p J/K all you memebers from California.

sheshovel
06-04-2005, 03:02 PM
Remember, Californians are just plain different. Look at any product you buy these days. "This product is known to the State of California to be...." I'm in Virginia, why should I care? Heinlein was right. California will eventually just split off from the rest of the good ole USA and, thankfully, they'll be doing us all a favor.
Mabey we will mabey we won't. And who the heck would want to live in Virginia anyway?I
know people who were born and raised there and and the first time they came here they stayed .
So we like to live on the edge,if the part they
say is going to break off does break off in my lifetime,well heck I'll have beach front property!!
And not only that.. alot of our population is comprised of people that came from back east,so alot of our blood shares the same roots as yours ,so don't act as if we are not a part of the good old USA because we are.We may be different and diverse but we are Americans and California is a great and beutiful state and the people here are mostly good people.So there!!

Runner
06-04-2005, 03:16 PM
As far as the test,...yeah, right. Just remember,...during the trial, the glove "didn't fit".

txlawnking
06-04-2005, 03:49 PM
But a lot of Days I wake up and thank the Lord I don't live there...Unfortunately, it seems like a lot of Californians have invaded Austin..Oh well, I don't live there either :D JK

gusbuster
06-04-2005, 04:59 PM
The granola state, cause your either a fruit, nut, or a flake. :p J/K all you memebers from California.

Remember, Californians are just plain different. Look at any product you buy these days. "This product is known to the State of California to be...." I'm in Virginia, why should I care? Heinlein was right. California will eventually just split off from the rest of the good ole USA and, thankfully, they'll be doing us all a favor.

Man, you guys should care because eventually it will effect you.

The only reason that you see all these bans and other ridiculous crap going on, many times it is mandated by federal law. The other reason, tell me how many other places in this country can you go start from one section of an interstate freeway and drive through 50 cities in a row,with a population of 20,000 or more in less than 100 miles of driving? It's called concert ration of people.

When you see California approved machines or components, don't think that it's about liberal Californians, because a lot of times, it's federally mandated due to the population size of California.

Case in point(last Thursday), California, New York, Illinois and a couple other states with a major populations went to the Federal E.P.A asking if the states can stop being required to use a special blend of gas, since we pay almost 35% more than the remaining parts of the country. The E.P.A said no.

Not everybody is an environmental wacko in California, just ignorant of facts.

Fareway Lawncare
06-04-2005, 07:20 PM
Blowers Are Bad For Gardens: One Professional's Opinion
Note: The statements below are taken from Steve Zien's letter to local Assembly members opposing SB 14, the bill that would prohibit California cities from banning blowers. Zien owns and operates Living Resources Company, an organic landscape management service. In addition, he is Executive Director of Biological Urban Gardening Services (BUGS), an international membership organization of primarily professional landscapers. Zien can be reached at (916) 726-5377.

BUGS has opposed the use of leaf blowers for many years for a variety of easons. There are many hidden costs when utilizing blowers regularly.

Wind speeds in excess of 180 mph are currently blasting landscapes throughout California. Leaves are ripped from branches, new growth and developing flowers are damaged and precious topsoil is blown away. Nurseries and Extension Agents are receiving more plant samples from gardeners indicating a tornado or hurricane devastated their landscape plants. In most instances the winds are unnatural in origin. Leaf blowers are producing wind speeds with greater force than a hurricane. They are having devastating effects.

Blower winds stress plants causing dehydration, burned leaves, and the suspension of photosynthesis and other natural plant functions. Overall growth is slowed. Natural openings in the leaves that allow for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide are sealed shut. Disease spores laying dormant on the soil or fallen debris are blown back onto plants where a little moisture can renew their cycle of infestation and damage. The severity of damage corresponds to the training of leaf blower operators. Blowers effectively distribute disease spores, weed seeds and insect eggs throughout the landscape (as well as to neighboring landscapes). Blowers create a disposal problem for many landscape managers gathering up a tremendous amount of organic debris. Instead of utilizing it appropriately on site it is generally hauled away for disposal. Most landscapers currently do not have a composting program to utilize this material. Most of this organic material ends up in sanitary landfill sites which are being rapidly filled to capacity. Many communities are passing regulations limiting the disposal of landscape wastes in landfills.

A common practice by professional landscapers is to simply blow plant debris off the property and into the street. Vehicular traffic then blows this material on neighboring landscapes or back onto the freshly blown site. Material is rarely moved into a pile where it can be collected and taken to a compost pile for proper recycling.

Another hidden cost of leaf blowers is that they deprive flowers, shrubs, and trees of life-giving mulch. Without this natural blanket, erosion, water evaporation and the spread of disease all become problems. Mulch, when not blown away, creates a favorable growing environment for plants and beneficial organisms both above and below ground while adding nutrients to the plants root zone. When mulch is removed to the compost and renewed annually many soil borne diseases are kept to a minimum.

Blowers use nonrenewable fossil fuels while creating air pollution. This is a serious problem in the Sacramento area.

Perhaps the major complaint most professional landscapers receive about the use of blowers is noise pollution. This is a serious problem that has resulted in local ordinances regulating the use of power blowers. Clients, their neighbors and the operator are all impacted by the howl.

This paints a bleak picture for the power blower. It is perhaps the most over and inappropriately used landscape tool. Autumn's tremendous amounts of organic debris that requires collection might be considered appropriate use of this tool. However, the weekly routine of blowing abuses the soil and damages landscape plants while the noise generated creates ill will from neighbors and clients alike. Leaf rakes deserve a renewed interest in the maintenance of landscapes.

The landscape maintenance industry should join BUGS and take a positive approach to blower bans. Old fashioned leaf raking can be a renewed service that their business could provide. It could be used as a selling point--no noise and environmentally sound too! Approach it right and they could charge the client an appropriate fee for this service, especially if blowers are banned. This could even become a major selling point for some companies. It could lead to business growth and the hiring of more personnel to meet the demand. Environmentally sound landscapers should be able to turn this kind of legislation into a positive for their businesses, making it work to their benefit.

sheshovel
06-05-2005, 03:54 AM
Well the law never passed so forget it it aint gonna happen too many people make a living with blowers here.

turfmann
06-05-2005, 08:54 AM
"Life-giving mulch"????? :D :D :D :D :D :D

After reading this piece by the "professional" I suggest we shred it, compost it and use it as a "life giving mulch". Certain to be better than manure!

When authors begin to use gratuitous adjectives like this I am immediately suspicious of their motivations. Give me facts, not opinions.