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View Full Version : $10,000 per week left on the table


Frog Lights, LLC
06-05-2005, 09:34 PM
Question:
Why are not more Landscapers doing landscape lighting?
It is a home run when you are doing planting ! Beyond simple !

packerbacker
06-05-2005, 09:56 PM
I was thinking about getting into it. Im expanding next year from just mowing and lighting seemed like a good add on for my company. I just want to make sure the things i add on are profitable.

Scapegoat
06-05-2005, 10:01 PM
I already do. It's an easy sell in my area.

I'll be honest why I don't buy other than local. Different fixtures give a very different light throw, often depending where they are located. I like my customers to test one or two overnight to see how they perform in their area. And if it's something I haven't worked with before, I want to see.

If it's an area that I know how a particular light will perform, I'll just make a recommendation, but in my area, there are small lots with complex pool areas, patios, retaining walls, etc, that it's hard to know how any fixture will perform in a given area, hence the fact that I can test one or two on the property and easily return/exchange them if needed.

But you are correct. Landscape lighting is easy money and I will certainly look over your website and give you my business when I can! Thanks for your sponsership of this site!!

crownls
06-16-2005, 08:31 AM
Noel, let me start off by saying i think nightscaping is a fantastic add-on service. I am extremely interested in any information. However some of the hurdles i am facing and i'm sure many other states are the same way. In order to install anything electrical in the state of Massachusetts, one has to get an electricians license. I am not opposed to getting one, but who has the time to take night courses for three years as well as spend an extra 5-6k for the classes alone. In addition in most cases (there are ways around this issue) you have to be an apprentice for 2 years under an electrical contractor to get licensed. Not many companies can work full-time, take classes, and work for someone for 12.00 hr until they get there license. If there were a two week course that companies could get training and a certificate, that would be helpful. But until then it is a difficult road to venture.

Mark
Crown LAwn Service

Frog Lights, LLC
06-17-2005, 07:50 AM
All of this is 12 volts ...low voltage. I have to check, in most states a license is not required for plug in low voltage. Do you have to get an electrician to add Christmas lights?

crownls
06-24-2005, 10:57 AM
Noel,

i contacted the state licensing board and at first they were'nt clear. However this is the latest response i received from them. Just another hoop to jump through. it looks like i'll have to sub out this type of work to a licensed electrician.

No person, firm or corporation shall enter into, engage in, or work at the business or occupation of installing wires, conduits, apparatus, devices, fixtures, or other appliances for carrying or using electricity for light, heat, power, fire warning or security system purposes, unless such person, firm or corporation shall be licensed by the state examiners of electricians in accordance with this chapter

sheshovel
06-24-2005, 11:19 AM
One of the main reasons I don't do alot of landscape lighting installations is because it's so easy the homeowners want to do it themselves or have already done it themselves,or when I suggest it or put it on the plan,they say oh yea I already have a set I'm going to put in,they have found what they like on sale and do it themselves.

TXNSLighting
05-14-2007, 08:52 AM
well im bumping this up, because the last couple nights i drove around in housing editions, (all $350,000+) somewhere around 1,000 houses i'm guessing. and 1 house out of all those had this low voltage lighting. thats why i am now getting into it. noone around here is offering it. and those houses need to be lit up! So this is definately a growig market. and i cant wait to get my share!

hamsey
05-14-2007, 11:00 AM
Well, I was looking to get into it until I found out you need to licensed here in CT. They just passed the law in 2006. So that's that!

Turf Troll
05-14-2007, 11:54 AM
$10,000 per week left on the table

Noel, what context is $10,000, in general across a state, a town, per contractor, me ?

And if it's "me" I'm ready,
do you have a game plan for me you would like to share. I have decide recently that I would like to increase lighting to 90 % of my business. I haven't contacted the printer I use for postcards yet or the list people to do a mailing but I would like to get it started by mid June or before,

if you have any recommendations or suggestions that would speed things along in this endeavor please let me know

General Landscaping
05-14-2007, 01:00 PM
No can do here.... license required.

If you want to do LV lighting, you need the same paperwork that allows you to wire a 3 phase factory.

I'm not sure if it is pressure from electrical contractors keeping it that way, or lack of pressure from potential LV specialists/installers.

Bill S
05-14-2007, 01:31 PM
It would appear here in the friendly state of NH, low voltage lighting would be acceptable so long as you are only plugging into a transformer. The transformer (when hard wired) would have to be installed by a licensed electrician.

Pro-Scapes
05-14-2007, 06:16 PM
the lvlia website has links to state info on licensing requirments. I think that requiring some sort of training or certification is great. While low voltage is safer its still electricity. As paul has stated many times amps are AMPS no matter what voltage your at. AMPS kill. You can get nailed by 25,000 volts with almost no amperage and its going to sting but you will be ok. Crank the amps up and your cooked.

I think all the manufactures and dist who try to recruit guys telling them things just "plug" in are only watching out for themselves and trying to move lights. To do this right takes knowledge and an understanding. I really feel someone telling you that your leaving 10k a week on the table is unethical. Anyone "plugging" in china lights pocketing 10k a week is ripping people off and giving the industry as a whole a bad name. While you can make a very comfortable profit on lighting and its a great addition its ALOT of work. Networking with a proffesional in your area can also reap a great extra profit potential for you thru a generous refferal program.

steveparrott
05-15-2007, 07:53 AM
Billy and others, just to be clear about the risk of a dangerous electric shock from low voltage lighting. There is no risk. Zero.

I've done extensive research and examined OSHA and NIOSH records going back are far as they have records. I also searched international databases for various engineering and safety organizations.

My findings: Zero deaths under 30 volts. Zero serious injuries under 24 volts.

The science in brief:

A reasonable worst case scenario, a contractor standing in muddy water, with sweaty hands, firmly grasping a common terminal in one hand and the 22V terminal in the other hand.

Resistance from hand to hand: about 1,000 ohms.

Amps = voltage/resistance

0.022 Amps = 22 volts/1,000 ohms

Equivalent to 22 mA.

According to the most recent authoritative study on electric shock from the IEC, there is negligible risk of death for any current under 30 mA.

So, even in this worst case scenario, there is no risk.

Any legislation that assumes risk of dangerous electric shock under 30 volts is just plain wrong.

Pro-Scapes
05-15-2007, 09:05 AM
Point taken steve but what about a closer shock point with less resistance... not just a hand to hand shock??? Im just asking from a learning point. I have been nailed before while repairing a system in the rain. It was my own fault as I relyed on someone else to turn the system off. Gave me a GOOD scare thats for sure.

Pro-Scapes
05-15-2007, 09:21 AM
I been trying to see his product for over a year now. Always promises never delivers.

its ok tho Im happy with what im using and I can be confident in it.

Frog Lights, LLC
05-15-2007, 11:41 AM
Compared to other professions it is not that difficult. It does not require extensive equipment or major investment. We do feel it requires training and offered to assist anyone who cares to listen or attend a class here at our facility. We suggest that interested parties try installation at their house or a friends home first, since one gets better qualified with experience. Frog Lights, LLC urges everyone to get certified and licensed as required and to COMPLY WITH LOCAL BUILDING CODES. We feel the LV lighting business is very rewarding both monitarily and through the personal satisfaction one receives in designing a thing of beauty.
Everyone is in business to earn a buck! Frog Lights, LLC is continually upgrading the quality of our products and we try to provide the very best merchandise at the most reasonable prices. Further, our product line is expanding with introduction of innovative unique products, not just me too items. We try to run this business professionally even though our distribution is limited. Further, I am sorry it is not our policy to send out free samples.
It is not our intention to make you "look bad", we believe in this open forum and put up my money each month to pay for it.

Turf Troll
05-15-2007, 12:21 PM
I'm grabing a few minutes on lunch break before I go out again,

What do you mean Noel? About 10,000

Noel, what context is $10,000, in general across a state, a town, per contractor,,

Can't wait to this evening to read everything now let me hurry and feed and go,:walking:

Chris J
05-15-2007, 02:32 PM
I believe what he is trying to lead you to believe is that any landscaper who is not up-selling their clients on landscape lighting and installing it along with everything else is missing out on a lot of money. What he is failing to mention, is that it is just not that simple. Any moron can throw a few lights into someones yard, but if you care about your customers and your companies reputation you will gain some knowledge and understanding of the business before you set out on this venture. Once these lights are installed, even by the professionals, they must be maintained. If you are going to consider installing lights, then you must also consider what it is going to take from your time to keep your customers happy.
Even with all that said, your not going to make $10k per week. It takes several years for someone to reach this level in lighting sales (if they are doing it full time) and I would bet that 95% of the guys with 5 years or less in the business still are not at this level.

Frog Lights, LLC
05-15-2007, 05:51 PM
Simply , it is a great "add on" sale. Yes, and the service is also addition revenue.

Chris J
05-16-2007, 09:02 PM
I believe what he is trying to lead you to believe is that any landscaper who is not up-selling their clients on landscape lighting and installing it along with everything else is missing out on a lot of money. What he is failing to mention, is that it is just not that simple. Any moron can throw a few lights into someones yard, but if you care about your customers and your companies reputation you will gain some knowledge and understanding of the business before you set out on this venture. Once these lights are installed, even by the professionals, they must be maintained. If you are going to consider installing lights, then you must also consider what it is going to take from your time to keep your customers happy.
Even with all that said, your not going to make $10k per week. It takes several years for someone to reach this level in lighting sales (if they are doing it full time) and I would bet that 95% of the guys with 5 years or less in the business still are not at this level.

Hey Noel,
Now I know why you called! My assistant wrote this post, but I do agree with what was said. When you called me, I didn't know what you were talking about but now I understand.