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NickN
06-14-2005, 09:47 AM
Since most lighting systems utilize a transformer that converts AC voltage to DC voltage,I'll stick with the DC side of things.
Voltage= The amount of energy required to move an amount of electrical charge.The symbol for Voltage is (E)
Electric circuit = A minimum of three components are required for all electric circuits:a source of energy,a load,and connecting wires.
Electron current = The quantity of electric charges that move past a given point during a period of 1 second(s).The symbol for current is (I)
Resistance = A factor in elelctrical circuits that is similar to mehcanical friction.The purpose of resistance is to limit or control the amount of electic current in a system.(Lights are a source of resistance.The wire in the bulb is high in resistance,so it generates friction or heat.In turn the wire glows from this and generates light.)The symbol for resistance is (R)
Ohm= A practical unit of measurement of electrical resistance.
Conductance= The description of the ability or ease with which a material conducts current.

Frog Lights, LLC
06-17-2005, 08:52 AM
YOU get an A. A= very good ! want a job?

NickN
06-17-2005, 12:00 PM
Luckily,you didn't count off for spelling. lol!

KathysLGC
06-17-2005, 02:53 PM
i think this will help some people with wiring but now how about some examples of resistance in multiple lighting systems and how to wire them. Wiring in series etc.

NickN
06-17-2005, 03:27 PM
I'm planning on doing that.I just have to find the time.

KathysLGC
06-17-2005, 05:37 PM
Yeah that takes a bit of knowledge to be able to explain it properly so people can follow.
You plan on explaining capacitors too?.... :) >all though I think they are already included with the LED light set-ups...

greenworldh20
06-19-2005, 10:41 PM
lighting design is sooooooooooooooooooooooooooo easy. just do the math. it is the same concept in irrigation if you think about it...

if you have 10 gpm and a head uses 3 gpm then you can put 3 heads on said zone.

if the zone is 400 feet away from water source, run big main line, then tee of lateral in smaller pipe sizes.

now for lights,

if you have a 300 watt transformer, you can put 8 vista well lights with 35 watt bulbs on one 'zone'.

if the run is far, use thicker cable and loop it. if run is short, less than 40 feet, use thinner cable.

simple....there are other tricks of the trade...anyone care to share?

brian

arosewag
06-21-2005, 07:42 PM
I try to run 1 'main' line to a spot that is approximately equal distance from each of the lights that will be on the zone, then run a secondary line to each fixture. Easy to troubleshoot if ever a problem, and keeps voltages similar.

Frog Lights, LLC
06-21-2005, 10:44 PM
I like it!

yz250fpilot
06-22-2005, 09:40 AM
A lot of documentation nowadays has Voltage denoted with a "V" for Voltage instead of an "E" which denotes Electromotive Force, which is Voltage. Just for people who may not know, V, and E are the same thing.

There are also 2 basic formulas that will help you immensely.

I = E/R ........Current(amps) = Voltage(volts) Divided by Resistance(ohms)

and

P = I x E ......Power(watts) = Current(amps) multiplied by Voltage(volts)

Remember these!

Here is a good website that explains many aspects of electricity and electrical circuits.

http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/index.html

Steve

steveparrott
06-27-2005, 02:41 PM
Quick point of correction: low voltage lighting transformers are stepping down from 120V AC to 12-22V AC. They don't convert to DC. (Although I've heard that LED's generally run off DC.)

If you want to check your work on voltage/amperage calculations go to the CAST Lighting calculator at http://www.cast-lighting.com/volt-calc.html .

Frog Lights, LLC
07-02-2005, 10:56 PM
LED's are 12 volt ac and use very little current and last for 11 years. LED lights are the wave of the future and that is why Frog Lights, LLC is the leader

greywynd
07-03-2005, 12:49 AM
LED's are 12 volt ac and use very little current and last for 11 years. LED lights are the wave of the future and that is why Frog Lights, LLC is the leader

Well, unless something's changed, LED's are light emitting diode's which only allow current to flow in one direction. However, if you put them in an AC circuit, they will allow one half of the current to pass. If you were to use an oscilloscope to watch the current flow in this circuit, only one half of the sine wave would be there, the other half would be 'chopped' off.

Frog Lights, LLC
07-03-2005, 10:58 AM
Yes , that is correct. Actually the chip is 3.6 volts d.c. but in low voltage lighting it is associated with a circuit to allow it to be used along with the other lights at 12 volt a.c.
Of course LEDs , with associated circuits, are used in many applications now including car and truck lights at 12-24 volts d.c. , traffic lights, and numerous other installations using high voltage a.c.

fixer67
07-03-2005, 11:49 PM
LED driver basics. I have LEDs running off 110 and 220 at my house. See picture below for tech.

greywynd
07-04-2005, 01:06 AM
Yes , that is correct. Actually the chip is 3.6 volts d.c. but in low voltage lighting it is associated with a circuit to allow it to be used along with the other lights at 12 volt a.c.
Of course LEDs , with associated circuits, are used in many applications now including car and truck lights at 12-24 volts d.c. , traffic lights, and numerous other installations using high voltage a.c.

Ahhh, I see, the basic LED is still the same, there's just the appropriate circuit in each light to supply the LED with what it requires, using 12V a.c. as the source (the lighting controller.) It's been a few years since my electronics courses, I didn't think the LED's would have changed. :dizzy:

kevinsky
07-13-2005, 08:16 PM
I try to run 1 'main' line to a spot that is approximately equal distance from each of the lights that will be on the zone, then run a secondary line to each fixture. Easy to troubleshoot if ever a problem, and keeps voltages similar.
I call that the Hub method. Are all those secondary wires the same length even if one fixture is further from the hub than another?

arosewag
07-18-2005, 10:03 PM
You could use the same length for the secondary runs, but I don't.

arosewag
07-18-2005, 10:04 PM
Can anyone explain why an x-10 switch for incandescent lighting will not work with other types of lighting or appliances?

fixer67
07-18-2005, 11:35 PM
Can anyone explain why an x-10 switch for incandescent lighting will not work with other types of lighting or appliances?


I take it you are taking about the X-10 remote switch system like the ones you can buy at RadioShack
TWO reasons. Reason #1 ,Some X-10 switch system do not turn off all the power but let just a little bit though so they have power to run. Reason #2, X-10 switches use a SCR switching circuit meaning the out put is really a pulsed DC output and not AC. Incandescent lights will run of just about any type of signal. Fluorescent lights and AC only motors will not, infact if you try to run Fluorescent lights and AC only motors off of a pulsed DC all you will do is fry it. If you can find a X-10 switch that has a TRIAC output which is two SCRs in reverse parallel that will give a an AC put out then maybe you can run your Fluorescent lights. NOTE= The X-10 wall outlets are either TRIAC output or relay output