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Commonwealth LC
06-30-2005, 06:26 PM
Are pine needles a favorable mulch for Azaleas? a customer wants some pines for mulch and i just wanted to make sure this is ok. thanks!

Kate Butler
06-30-2005, 10:23 PM
Pine needles are good for azaleas: they look good and help to make the PH range where the plants like it.

Guthrie&Co
07-01-2005, 03:44 AM
Pine needles are good for azaleas: they look good and help to make the PH range where the plants like it.
Wrong. pine needles have no nutritional value to any shrubs. the wont give you water retention, soil temp control, nutrients for the soil or control the ph at all.

if your looking for some thing to go under those plants go with a shredded pine mulch and stay away from the hardwoods. the pine will give you all of the above and it is naturally resistant to pests. unlike pine needles or hardwood mulch. by the way lay that mulch at 4 inches if you can. it will cut down on the weeds. pine needles wont give you all of the benefits that mulch can.

Kate Butler
07-01-2005, 09:34 PM
I must disagree, see cited thread:

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=87347&highlight=azaleas.+pine+needles

Also, there is the first law of thermodynamics regarding the conservation of energy. If something changes form (decomposition, in the case of mulch) it doesn't disappear, it becomes something else - mulch decomposes into compost. Compost is good for the soil.

Guthrie&Co
07-13-2005, 11:31 AM
I must disagree, see cited thread:

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=87347&highlight=azaleas.+pine+needles

Also, there is the first law of thermodynamics regarding the conservation of energy. If something changes form (decomposition, in the case of mulch) it doesn't disappear, it becomes something else - mulch decomposes into compost. Compost is good for the soil.
most hardwoods will not acidify the soil but if you use a pine it will. the benifits of pine mulch outweigh pine needles by far.

northwest lawn
07-14-2005, 04:52 PM
four inches a lil thick dont ya think?

sheshovel
07-14-2005, 06:24 PM
[QUOTE=scabyscapes]Wrong. pine needles have no nutritional value to any shrubs. the wont give you water retention, soil temp control, nutrients for the soil or control the ph at all(Quote)

No your wrong,what do you think feeds the pine trees in the forest.Does God go out there and mulch with pine mulch?No ,
pine needles are great for a natural mulch,do help the soil retain water because they break down and keep the soil open and healthy and healthy soils retain water. A
s far as soil temp goes anything that covers the soil besides plastic,shades it and therefore keeps it cooler.

Guthrie&Co
07-14-2005, 06:55 PM
[QUOTE=scabyscapes]Wrong. pine needles have no nutritional value to any shrubs. the wont give you water retention, soil temp control, nutrients for the soil or control the ph at all(Quote)

No your wrong,what do you think feeds the pine trees in the forest.Does God go out there and mulch with pine mulch?No ,
pine needles are great for a natural mulch,do help the soil retain water because they break down and keep the soil open and healthy and healthy soils retain water. A
s far as soil temp goes anything that covers the soil besides plastic,shades it and therefore keeps it cooler.
if you say so. but i am going to fall back on my degree in horticultre on this one. and 4 inches in perfect. as for what feeds the pine tree, it the nutrients that are found in the soil. most of which you dont get from the needles.

sheshovel
07-15-2005, 08:00 PM
OK then if this is what you have been taught this is what must be what you are going to believe.Now go out into the forest under a grove of tall pines,and stick your shovel in the earth and turn that soil over and look at it.Then do a soil test then come back and tell me what you found.

Guthrie&Co
07-17-2005, 02:07 AM
OK then if this is what you have been taught this is what must be what you are going to believe.Now go out into the forest under a grove of tall pines,and stick your shovel in the earth and turn that soil over and look at it.Then do a soil test then come back and tell me what you found.
I will tell you what i found. a landscaper who has been in the bizz for 15 years and hasnt figured it out yet.

Dirty Water
07-17-2005, 02:15 AM
Scaby: If your 22, and you've been in the business 8 years, then you were studying horticulture at 14?

Personally, I think you need to either come up with a good rebuttal (facts come to mind) to what Sheshovel is saying, or shut up.

Guthrie&Co
07-17-2005, 02:44 AM
Scaby: If your 22, and you've been in the business 8 years, then you were studying horticulture at 14?

Personally, I think you need to either come up with a good rebuttal (facts come to mind) to what Sheshovel is saying, or shut up.
No you cowchip. here is how it works. at the age of 14 you work a patime job. then it was at a nursery. when you complete highschool you go to college that is when you study horticulture fulltime. There you do your own research, experiments, aquire knowledge that the ol' boss man has no clue about. personally i could give a frogs fat ass if you two agree with me or not. And while your at it the next time you go and plant your shrubbery dont forget to amend the hole with pine needles. after all if you use that you wont need the ironite,black kow, starter fert or anything else. Dont forget your magnolia leaves too. they make great organic fert.


by the way its 23 not 22. do the math

Dirty Water
07-17-2005, 02:53 AM
No you cowchip. here is how it works. at the age of 14 you work a patime job. then it was at a nursery. when you complete highschool you go to college that is when you study horticulture fulltime. There you do your own research, experiments, aquire knowledge that the ol' boss man has no clue about. personally i could give a frogs fat ass if you two agree with me or not. And while your at it the next time you go and plant your shrubbery dont forget to amend the hole with pine needles. after all if you use that you wont need the ironite,black kow, starter fert or anything else. Dont forget your magnolia leaves too. they make great organic fert.

I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with sheshovel, I'm just pointing out that your argument skills have a leave a lot to be desired.


by the way its 23 not 22. do the math

You need to update your profile.

Guthrie&Co
07-17-2005, 03:11 AM
[QUOTE=JonHolland] I'm just pointing out that your argument skills have a leave a lot to be desired.
QUOTE]
I could care less if my argument skills are par on an internet forum. i dont put alot of stock in the members or the site really. yeah its a nice site but at the end of the day do i need to waste my time on proving a point on the net to someone who most likely doesnt affect me? nope. Besides its hard to convey ones point to another on the internet. it can be taken in so many diffrent ways, your really just wasting your time. after all most of its just entertainment anyway.

Dirty Water
07-17-2005, 02:34 PM
I could care less if my argument skills are par on an internet forum. i dont put alot of stock in the members or the site really. yeah its a nice site but at the end of the day do i need to waste my time on proving a point on the net to someone who most likely doesnt affect me? nope. Besides its hard to convey ones point to another on the internet. it can be taken in so many diffrent ways, your really just wasting your time. after all most of its just entertainment anyway.

I'm sorry you feel that way.

Personally, I use this forum to learn...and to teach. As do most of the others here.

If you aren't willing to learn, and have nothing positive to contribute, then you shouldn't be here.

sheshovel
07-20-2005, 03:28 PM
[QUOTE=sheshovel]
if you say so. but i am going to fall back on my degree in horticultre on this one. and 4 inches in perfect. as for what feeds the pine tree, it the nutrients that are found in the soil. most of which you dont get from the needles.

Tell me then,besides the rain,and dead animals,where do these nutrients come from in the soil of a pine forest?

sheshovel
07-20-2005, 03:43 PM
I agree that softwood mulch IS better than pine needles...BUT this guy was asking about pine needles not softwood mulch
and pine needles are perfectly OK for azalea mulch.by the way you spelled horticulture wrong.

Guthrie&Co
07-20-2005, 04:05 PM
the way you spelled horticulture wrong.
yeah i need to get another keyboard. i pulled all of the keys off of it to clean it and it seems like thay like to stick down alot now. it makes it a real pain in the rear to type now

northwest lawn
07-20-2005, 10:19 PM
i think ur full of ****...pine needles are excellent mulch for aricacea sp? plants but four inches is a lil thick for mulch. guarentee pine needles are the best for acid loving plants

northwest lawn
07-20-2005, 10:22 PM
they dont recomend to amend the bed anymore. unless the two different soils are differnt i.e. plant to bed. and if it is it would be better to amend the whole planting sight not just the hole

Guthrie&Co
07-21-2005, 01:39 AM
i think ur full of ****...pine needles are excellent mulch for aricacea sp? plants but four inches is a lil thick for mulch. guarentee pine needles are the best for acid loving plants
well thats fine your only 19 and havent been in the bussiness that long. 4 inches is perfect for a new install. the thicker the mulch is layed the less chance you have of weeds coming through it. now i know you dont want to smother the root ball but 4 inches on a new install will cover your basis. i wouldnt lay it that thick everytime but it is a recommend practice to maintain it. a good pine mulch's benifits will out weigh pine needles any day. pine mulch will give you the ph needed, water retention, soil temperature control, organic fert as it beaks into humus. with all the humus from the mulch it increases microbial activity in the soil and incourages worm activity as well. thus helping keep the soil loose to a certian extent.

Guthrie&Co
07-21-2005, 01:41 AM
they dont recomend to amend the bed anymore. unless the two different soils are differnt i.e. plant to bed. and if it is it would be better to amend the whole planting sight not just the hole
expain that. what good does it do to amend where the root zone isnt? sure amend wider than deeper scince roots tend to grow that way but why amend where you dont even have a possible root zone?

northwest lawn
07-23-2005, 04:12 PM
it is now recommended to do the whole planting bed...why for future plantings that will go in there. dont forget roots do spread the more that is amended the better the plant will be

northwest lawn
07-23-2005, 04:14 PM
i may be 19 but i have owned my company for four years.. worked in the industry since i was 15. and now im going to school for it..landscape and turgrass management.

Guthrie&Co
07-29-2005, 09:39 PM
i may be 19 but i have owned my company for four years.. worked in the industry since i was 15. and now im going to school for it..landscape and turgrass management. so you worked for a guy for how long before you had it all figured out and up and decided to start your own bussiness?

northwest lawn
07-30-2005, 06:26 PM
i worked for a large lco for two years, as well as a retail nursery for two years while i did small landscape installs, as well as a little mowing on the side for extra cash while i worked there, then i decided to go out on my own and now im studying landscape and turgrass management

Guthrie&Co
07-31-2005, 01:37 PM
i may be 19 but i have owned my company for four years.. worked in the industry since i was 15. and now im going to school for it..landscape and turgrass management.
i htink you might be fudging the truth the numbers just dont add up.so from age 15 to 17 you worked for someone, then at best you have been working for yourself for 2 years. but you said in am earlier post you have owned your company for 4 years. fill in the blanks for me i am having a hard time following this

TScapes
08-01-2005, 10:33 AM
People..... people..... :dizzy:

Let's agree to disagree! This is like watching a tennis match. :rolleyes:

Let's agree that whether the original poster uses pine needles or pine mulch, it will benefit the azaleas. After all, either one is better than hardwood mulch, especially when it comes to harboring or attracting insects and fungi.

As to the question of whether pine needles allow the ground to retain moisture, ....it does. P/S just tends to break down quicker than normal mulch. It starts out really airy and "Fluffy", then settles down to a nice mat. The more seasons that p/s is applied to a bed, the more moisture it retains due to the "build-up" of compost and straw.

As for the 4" of mulch on a new install, that is the recommended depth. Now we are talking "New construction" though. This means that this is basically bare ground that we are applying the mulch to. If it is simply dressing up the bed where you "added" some plants, then 4" is a little to thick.

northwest lawn
08-02-2005, 07:41 PM
owened business for a total of four years part time while working for a retial nursery as well as a landscaping company. what part dont u understand?