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TriplePLandscaping
07-14-2005, 10:55 PM
next week we will be starting a project for a customer. her backyard has an inground pool that is raised on a slope as compared to the backyard. her problem is that the soil around the pool is eroding down and lessening the slope. heres where we come in, we will be installing an 85 linear foot long versa-lok wall that runs the direction of the backyard then makes a 45 degree turn to the right then straight then another 45, so basically three straight sections. the middle 18 foot section will be 3.5' high and then the grade goes up for the two ends so that the wall height will only be 2 feet. behind the wall we are doing the standard drain tile set up with a #57 fill then dumping soil to make the area between the wall and the pool level(slight grade for washoff). and now with the area between the pool and wall will have flagstone installed(customer's minds change all the time) So between the pool and wall is approx. 11 feet. so a total of 817 sq. feet of flagstone. with 5 3'x3' planters cut out of the flagstone. the total cost of the job is approaching 7 thousand mayb more. just wanted to know if anyone has any advice id appreciate it.

mbella
07-14-2005, 11:21 PM
Is this your job or do you work for somebody?

TriplePLandscaping
07-15-2005, 10:07 AM
this is my job

mbella
07-15-2005, 12:59 PM
The price is approaching $7000.00? You should be well beyond $7000.00 and I don't need to know your operating costs to know that. Here is a pic of one we finished recently. The square footage is a little more than yours, but there wasn't any flat work, just the wall. The price was more than $7000.00 and remember, NO Flagstone.

TriplePLandscaping
07-15-2005, 07:36 PM
the approx. sq. footage for the wall face is 231.5 feet which figures to be 347 blocks, and remember these blocks weigh 82 pounds a piece. ive wanted to charge more but my partner is always paranoid about losing customers and is willing to work for cheap.

RedWingsDet
07-15-2005, 07:58 PM
mbella... wall looks great... I just have a question... shouldnt they be stagered more? it seems like the seams are to close to eachother

mbella
07-15-2005, 08:06 PM
the approx. sq. footage for the wall face is 231.5 feet which figures to be 347 blocks, and remember these blocks weigh 82 pounds a piece. ive wanted to charge more but my partner is always paranoid about losing customers and is willing to work for cheap.

That wall you see in the pic is 238 sq. ft. and is Versa Lok. So, I do remember that they weigh 82 pounds. I don't see your point.

Anyway, your numbers are WAY off. I can understand how you could do the wall for $7000.00. That's reasonable. However, the entire project? That is ridiculous, regardless of your numbers, location or anything else.

mbella
07-15-2005, 08:41 PM
mbella... wall looks great... I just have a question... shouldnt they be stagered more? it seems like the seams are to close to eachother

Mark, staggering or laying a running bond is best. However, a perfect running bond is not essential. We try to keep the joints staggered at least a few inches.

What your not seeing in that pic is the batter or where the wall begins. The wall comes off of the pool deck at a 90. It then does another 90 and into a curve. The straight run that comes off of the pool deck is perpendicular to the curve that you're seeing to the right side of the pic.

Well, that straight run batters back into the part of the wall you're seeing and it throws off the staggering of the joints. The only way to maintain a perfect running bond on a wall like that is to do more cutting than I care to do. It's not necessary.

NNJLandman
07-16-2005, 12:21 AM
TriplePLandscaping- Your wall job should be way beyond the cost of $7,000.00. The installation of the wall alone should be around $6,000.00. I would say this job should be around $10,000.00 with equipment, materials, and labor to be profitable.

Mbella- That job looks really good, keep up the good work.

Mark- You'll find that with most walls when you try spacing the block in the middle/staggered more that once you make a turn its almost impossible. Also I have found with many wall systems as you go on the blocks tend to get closer together even if you try to space them.

Jeff

TriplePLandscaping
07-16-2005, 10:44 AM
i completely agree with all of you that our price should be alot higher than what it is. like i said earlier, we are only in our second year as a company and my partner is really paranoid about losing jobs to sitcker shock and is willing to work for very cheap in order to not lose the customer. when i priced the job out myself i was around 9500, for the entire project, 7000 was a compromise with him. as we build our customer base, i hope that he will let me do more of the pricing as i'm more experienced with this line of work having a 6 year background in construction and masonry work. so mbella i not trying to argue with you b/c i agree with you, and i def. dont want to be labeled a lowballer.

mbella
07-16-2005, 12:22 PM
Triplep, your price is beyond lowballer, it's ridiculous. Anyway, be careful. If you guys do nice work and you get referrals, what price do you think those referrals will expect? If you try to get your prices where they should be, that's when the real sticker shock will happen. Those referrals are going to say, "but my friends job was only x amount of dollars, why is mine so high?"

With this kind of work, you don't want to get referrals because you are cheap. You want to get them because you do nice work.

TriplePLandscaping
07-17-2005, 06:40 PM
thanks, mbella, ive never that about that side of the coin. i will be having a talk with my partner to discuss future projects. i dont want to be constantly stuck in a cycle of nice projects/cheap payouts.