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View Full Version : Will this work? - Rhino Lining


OnMyOwn
07-30-2005, 10:29 PM
Hey Guys,

I'm getting ready to purchase another trailer. It will be small 10' trailer for a solo and I am planning on how to outfit the trailer. I always put deck boards on the sides of the trailer to haul mulch and attach the proper trimmer / blower racks.

I started thinking about a Jeep I saw a few weeks ago that was completely coated (interior / exterior) with Rhino lining. This got me thinking about doing it to my new trailer. Would this be a good step in saving the trailer from scratches and gauges. It should only add about 75 lb. to the overall weight. Would it help with traction on the gate?

Another thought - has anyone ever thought about using this stuff under a mower deck, or on top of a deck. I have a few old mowers that might look better if they were coated with a textured "black" lining.

Lastly, some of my counterparts in the industry have began applying Rhino lining to the exterior of their trucks, 6" around the bottom of the sides. It saves on the rock chips and helps with the appearance.

What do you think?

Shuter
07-30-2005, 10:31 PM
In addition to pick-up trucks, I am starting to see dump bodies with Rhino or Line X.

Jpocket
07-30-2005, 10:34 PM
I wouldn't do it.

exmark72
07-30-2005, 10:36 PM
adding a rhino lining to a dump trailer\body defeat the purpose of the very smooth paint surface already applied. also it would cause things to stink and not slide out with ease.

mcwlandscaping
07-30-2005, 10:37 PM
they do offer it. how much $? don't know. a regular truck bed is like $400. I would do it to my trailer if i didn't just buy the eXmark! sounds like a good investment. Post on how it comes out if you do it. Some pics too. Mower deck NO, trailer maybe, i don't know how well it would dump with it.

green-go
07-30-2005, 10:38 PM
I definitely wouldn't put anything like that on the bottom of a mower deck.

It might not be a bad idea for a trailer's deck surface though.

LALawnboy
07-30-2005, 10:50 PM
a few months back, some people posted about spraying their trailers with line-x (just like rhino) and they loved it. as far as a mower deck, i definitely wouldn't do that. don't have any good reasons except for not wanting to waste money on spraying the bottom of my mowers.

True Cut Lawn Maintenance
07-30-2005, 10:51 PM
Use somthing like Slip Plate, available from John Deere dealers for underside of decks. Its got graphite in it, also acts like a sealer on the metal. I think its available in spray cans quart cans and gallon cans

moremowing4me
07-30-2005, 10:55 PM
I definitely wouldn't put anything like that on the bottom of a mower deck.

It might not be a bad idea for a trailer's deck surface though.

people around here do it all the time. saves the deck from the sand wearing on it and it keeps grass from getting sticking to the bottom.

Eclipse
08-01-2005, 10:22 PM
I prefer Line-X as in my experience it has held up better than Rhino.

I had the floor of my enclosed trailer done and it is by far on of the best things I have done to that trailer.

Dreams To Designs
08-02-2005, 10:54 AM
Is the Line-X slippery when it gets wet? I have seen Rhino linings in pickup beds that were as slippery as glass when wet.

Kirk

Eclipse
08-02-2005, 09:28 PM
The Line-X goes get a little slick when wet but nothing that's bad at all.

I have a set of steel running boards on my truck sprayed with it and it is not an issue to stand on them when getting in and out of the truck in the rain.

StealthDT
08-02-2005, 09:28 PM
Line-X is a two coat process with the first coat smooth. The second coat is sprayed on to create a non-slip rough texture for liability purposes. My local Line-X guy has a waiver to sign if you want it smooth for dumping.

The smooth coat is great for mower decks cause wet grass doesn't stick to it. It prevents corrosion, cuts down on the noise, and easy to clean. Been on mine for two years, no problems.

Eclipse
08-02-2005, 09:51 PM
The smooth coat is great for mower decks cause wet grass doesn't stick to it. It prevents corrosion, cuts down on the noise, and easy to clean. Been on mine for two years, no problems.

I'm going to have to talk to my Line-X guy about this. We have become decent friends with all the stuff I have had him do for me, I'm sure he would like to take some more of my money :D

Thanks for the info!

OnMyOwn
08-02-2005, 10:56 PM
Line-X: Obviously this is a similar, yet alternative for Rhino lining. Is Line-X a dealer name? I'm not sure I have seen it around the Indianapolis area.

Scag48
08-03-2005, 03:44 AM
I don't understand the need for Rhino/Line-X linings on a trailer. Treated wood will last quite a long time, painted metal will last even longer, and traction up the gate with an expanded metal gate is usually excellent. Plus, there's no way that someone is going to tell me that a liner is going to be more skid resistant than wood, especially when wet. It also poses as a safety hazard with plastic gas cans. Since the lining is somewhat plastic itself, static electricity can build up and cause a can to explode. No matter how safe you are with keeping a plastic can off the lining, why risk it?

The Dude
08-03-2005, 04:23 PM
I don't understand the need for Rhino/Line-X linings on a trailer. Treated wood will last quite a long time, painted metal will last even longer, and traction up the gate with an expanded metal gate is usually excellent. Plus, there's no way that someone is going to tell me that a liner is going to be more skid resistant than wood, especially when wet. It also poses as a safety hazard with plastic gas cans. Since the lining is somewhat plastic itself, static electricity can build up and cause a can to explode. No matter how safe you are with keeping a plastic can off the lining, why risk it?

There is no risk of static electricity with Line-X. The static is created when the cheap plastic bedliner moves against the metal of the bed. Since about 60% of the paint is removed during preping for line-x it bonds with the bed.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread....ighlight=line-x

I am too lazy to type this again....


LINE-X and Rhino differ quite a bit. The biggest difference is that LINE-X contains polyurea and Rhino does not. Polyurea enhances the bedliner’s properties: 1. LINE-X's temperature tolerance is 250 degrees and Rhino's is 175. As the temperature of the bed approaches the temp tolerance, it loses its strength. 2. Polyurea keeps moisture out of the solution thus making a more dense and solid liner. Less moisture also means better adhesion. 3. Polyurea also makes for a harder liner. The tear strength of LINE-X is 304 pounds per linear inch (pli). Rhino is 145 pli. 4. Polyurea sets up very fast, that's one reason why LINE-X goes on with heat and high pressure. LINE-X dries in about 4 seconds, so you get an even application throughout the bed. Rhino takes a minute or so to even gel, an hour or so to dry. Before it gels, gravity can pull the liner from the top ridges in to the low valleys. Rhino’s Tuff Stuff goes on cold/low pressure and thus has that “cottage cheese” or “rain on the windshield” look. LINE-X’s high heat/high pressure system gives it a very nice finished and more consistently applied texture, it’s sort of like an orange peel. The dealer can vary the texture from smooth to very rough. 5. Polyurea makes the liner more chemical resistant, especially to organic oils and solvents.

LINE-X is the only brand with a NATIONWIDE lifetime warranty. Rhino's warranty is only with the dealer that sprayed it.

Here is a bit of history: First on the scene were epoxy based products. They were not very durable, they cracked, peeled, etc. Then, ONE-part polyurethane products came along. One-part means that the polyurethane is suspended in a solvent. A catalyst is added which starts a chemical reaction that removes the solvent so that you have just polyurethane left. They were a significant improvement over epoxy based products. Examples of today’s one-part polyurethanes include Herculiner, Duplicolor, Durabak, and Speedliner. The newest technology is TWO-part polyurethanes. Two-part means that a resin (usually a polyol resin) is mixed with isocyanate (a hardener) which renders the polyurethane. Two-part polyurethanes are harder and much more durable than one-part polyurethanes. Two-part polys are used on today’s boats, airplanes, etc. Examples of today’s products that have two-part polyurethanes include LINE-X and Rhino.

Most brands just add pigment to color the liner. Pigmented liners will fade. Most LINE-X dealers also use Dupont Nason paint. Nason paint is an automotive paint and will not fade. If you get a color match, be sure they use Nason paint as well as pigment.
Hope that helps!

VanceTrendov
08-06-2005, 12:10 PM
Hey Guys,

Another thought - has anyone ever thought about using this stuff under a mower deck, or on top of a deck. I have a few old mowers that might look better if they were coated with a textured "black" lining.

What do you think?


Under a mower deck??? you want more grass to build up? I am setting up a fleet of trucks about 5-7, and everyone one is going to have lining in the floor of the cab.

Eclipse
08-06-2005, 07:22 PM
Under a mower deck??? you want more grass to build up? I am setting up a fleet of trucks about 5-7, and everyone one is going to have lining in the floor of the cab.

If the product is applied smooth without the added texture (as far as LineX) it will work well. There is another thread going with mention of this.