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i_plant_art
08-10-2005, 06:36 PM
Does anyone have slotted, drilled, or slotted/drilled rotors on their truck? I am in need of new rotors and want to get the most for my money. I got a quote from the shop ( i personally know the owner so i know hes not pulling my leg) of 873.00 for new rotors and labor. These were coming from NAPA and as he said were "low end to keep the cost down". I have a 2000 F-350 PSD 4x4 doolie. i know its gonna be expensive but ive heard that slotted/drilled are the best b/c of the the rapid heat loss on the rotor, which is good. I m just looking to find soemthing economically as well as something that is going to last me considering i pull a trailer(with brakes) all the time. Any recomendations of going stock or aftermarket would be great thanks.

PTP
08-10-2005, 06:53 PM
Well, I just called Autozone and the whole thing would cost about $200 plus tax.

Brakes are generally very easy to fix. I don't remember specifically about the F350 though. It may be a little more complicated if the rotor and hub assembly are one piece.

At any rate, if you are mechanically inclined at all I would suggest learning how to do it yourself. Buy the book if you need to. But if you are not sure that you can do it, then pay the man. It is better to be sure that your breaks will work than to save a little money.

Master Po
08-10-2005, 08:09 PM
Well, I just called Autozone and the whole thing would cost about $200 plus tax.

Brakes are generally very easy to fix. I don't remember specifically about the F350 though. It may be a little more complicated if the rotor and hub assembly are one piece.

At any rate, if you are mechanically inclined at all I would suggest learning how to do it yourself. Buy the book if you need to. But if you are not sure that you can do it, then pay the man. It is better to be sure that your breaks will work than to save a little money.
That's right. If you are capable, do it yourself. I don't know about the 350, but my 2000 Silverado was very easy. Then again it is always worth that feeling of self assurance that your big truck with a big trailer will stop when you are pulling up to a red light.

i_plant_art
08-11-2005, 12:47 AM
yeah i know wha tu guys mean brakes, transmission, and diesel are the 3 things i wont touch....... im gonna buy the parts and have him put them on ... he suggested this so that i get a better product that the "low grade" NAPA rotors.... they prob aint worth the box they come in ya know ......... im just not sure if its worth getting the drilled or not, or if they will "shave" the same next time they need to be turned......

Dirty Water
08-11-2005, 01:04 AM
yeah i know wha tu guys mean brakes, transmission, and diesel are the 3 things i wont touch....... im gonna buy the parts and have him put them on ... he suggested this so that i get a better product that the "low grade" NAPA rotors.... they prob aint worth the box they come in ya know ......... im just not sure if its worth getting the drilled or not, or if they will "shave" the same next time they need to be turned......

Do you have a Dualy axle? If so, Rotors are going to be very expensive. Either way, its a total piece of cake, even if you have to take them to a shop to have bearings pressed out and in ($20).

I haven't had anyone do my brakes since Mida's quoted my wife $600 to do what cost me $100.

As far as crossdrilled/slotted rotors, Most of them are marketing hype.

However slotted rotors do keep the pads from glazing and distribute heat pretty well.

lawnmaniac883
08-11-2005, 04:03 PM
If quality is what your looking for in rotors, then get the stainless rotors. As far as slotted or drilled, your choice but they do aid in stopping power and longetivity.

Eclipse
08-12-2005, 12:23 AM
Slotted rotors are not a boad idea but certaily stay away from a drilled rotor, especially on a truck that is used like a truck.

UNISCAPER
08-12-2005, 01:08 AM
Instead of taking chances on something that will get you marginal results, try something that will give you bigbang for the buck. You have a turbo diesel, right? Install a Jake brake (engine brake on pick up truck sized vehicles) we have them as standard equipment on all our 4500-5500 series Chevies as well as the 2 Macks. Hit the switch, take your foot off the gas and let the engine take on the load without ever heating the brakes up. Cost wise it should pencil out about the same.

easycareacres
08-12-2005, 01:17 AM
A Jake brake, way to go havent seen or herd of them but sounds the go.
I had slotted rotors replaced on my landcrusier as towing and alot better as heating on the rotor itself, the slots remove the heat and gases that constanly attracted.

Eclipse
08-12-2005, 01:17 AM
An exhaust brake is a good idea but only if he has a manual tranny. Exhaust brakes and auto trannies (at least the ones in light duty trucks) do not get along well.

UNISCAPER
08-12-2005, 01:24 AM
They work great in the Allisons because they are what is called constant flow, meaning they don't glide like a normal automatic until you get under 10mph.

easycareacres
08-12-2005, 01:39 AM
jake brake haa sorry had not herd of that term, exhaust brakes yes same thing here but now understand jake brake.
Id like to shove employees out door for the flinstone feet stop and wear there skin out heee

Eclipse
08-12-2005, 01:56 AM
jake brake haa sorry had not herd of that term, exhaust brakes yes same thing here but now understand jake brake.
Id like to shove employees out door for the flinstone feet stop and wear there skin out heee

Actually technically speaking exhaust brakes and jake brakes are not the same.

A Jake brake works by using hydraulic pressure to momentarily open the exhaust valve at the end of the compression stroke, venting off the compressed air into the exhaust system. The braking of a Jake brake occurs because of the pumping loss compressing the air, and then eliminating the compressed air “rebound” on the power stroke.

An exhaust brake creates a major restriction in the exhaust system, and in turn creates substantial exhaust backpressure to ****** engine speed and offer supplemental braking.

Eclipse
08-12-2005, 01:58 AM
They work great in the Allisons because they are what is called constant flow, meaning they don't glide like a normal automatic until you get under 10mph.

I didn't know many guys were using an exhaust brake on a DMax/Allison combo because of the grade braking feature, or whatever it is called, built into the electronics of the transmission.

UNISCAPER
08-12-2005, 10:21 AM
On the 4500 series, it is an electronic style exhaust brake that is tied into the transmission brake system. I can enter a 7° downhill grade that runs 4 miles, now for those who don't know, a 7° grade is about what a 3-1 slope would be on a dirt grade. Hit the button, and between the truck tranny and engine brakes, A) you don't even know you have a load on, and B) you rarely even use the foot brake.

I was leery at first because I just never trust truck electronic gizmos and prefer manual, but these things really work for us. We had a 5500 go in for it's scheduled 30K maintenance and the regular axle brakes were still at 95%, even pulling the loads we do. I think before long this option will be available on all trucks, it makes too much sense to have it.

i_plant_art
08-12-2005, 10:32 AM
Do you have a Dualy axle? If so, Rotors are going to be very expensive. Either way, its a total piece of cake, even if you have to take them to a shop to have bearings pressed out and in ($20).

I haven't had anyone do my brakes since Mida's quoted my wife $600 to do what cost me $100.

As far as crossdrilled/slotted rotors, Most of them are marketing hype.

However slotted rotors do keep the pads from glazing and distribute heat pretty well.

Stupid question, but how would i know if i have a dooley axle, vs a regular axle.... i would assum that its a dooley axle since the truck is a dooley. What is the difference in the two , one being wider or what?

UNISCAPER
08-12-2005, 10:50 AM
"Stupid question, but how would i know if i have a dooley axle, vs a regular axle.... i would assum that its a dooley axle since the truck is a dooley. What is the difference in the two , one being wider or what?"


Very important question I plant. Since the truck has dual rear wheels, assumingf it was like that from the factory and not some Worchoskis add on ( they make dual rear wheel kits for 3/4 ton trucks) you have bigger rear brakes, thus, more of an ankle holding adventure when you buy parts.


"Actually technically speaking exhaust brakes and jake brakes are not the same."

Correct Eclipse. I made it sounds as they were...They do however, perform similar functions. And in the case of someone who is considering russian roulette by cheeze punching rotors, the performance should blow rotor holes out of the water for about the same money. The only time I have ever really seen vented rotors really work is in a road course or asphalt track stock car. They are traveling speeds where enough air runs through them to work. Matter of fact if you look at a short track car, and a long super speedway tyoe car, the rotors they run are different. On a truck where you are not hitting speeds over 65 or so, venting a rotor will have a significant cost, with marginal results.

Anyhow, nice thought, try a different direction. What about stepping up you trailer brakes? Add a bigger diameter drum or rotor as well?

mowingtowing
08-12-2005, 04:56 PM
as for the front of the f350 brakes, if its 4x4 and dually, its a walk in the park, if its a 2wd, dually, then the hub and rotor are 1 piece. The rear rotors are the same for 2 or 4 wheel drive dually, a one piece assembly for hub and rotor. Also, if you do rear brakes yourself, youll need a 50 dollor socket to get the outer wheel bearing nut off. If you take any hub/wheel bearing assembly apart, it would be a good idea to replace the seal on it.
As for slotted/drilled rotors, they might stop better b/c they might be cooler, however, drilled rotors do have less surface area then regular rotors (of the same diameter). Also, it may be hard to get a shop to turn or resurface slotted/drilled rotors later on down the road.