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Grass Cake
08-13-2005, 08:19 PM
What's your thoughts?
Do you think water in the rear tires helps?hurts?

TURF DOCTOR
08-13-2005, 08:27 PM
people use antifrezze here i don't go there.

Jcs Lawn and Landscape
08-13-2005, 08:32 PM
wont that rust the rims out

Grass Cake
08-13-2005, 08:36 PM
That should be fluids.
Semantics smantics.
:)

topsites
08-13-2005, 08:42 PM
Only thing I've ever put in a tire is a sealer like fix-a-flat, but I like your choices of vote.

geogunn
08-13-2005, 08:50 PM
I understand filling farm tractor tires...but are you taling about?

GEO

Shuter
08-13-2005, 08:53 PM
Never heard of it.

ProLawns
08-13-2005, 10:32 PM
Water goes in the radiator, air goes in the tires. ;)

Itsgottobegreen
08-14-2005, 12:31 AM
Well if you are talking about tractors. Than yes. My tractor has loaded rear tires. These new compact tractors are to light in the rear end. So you need counter weight. Or you will flip them while using a loader. (talking from experience here)

You fill them to 75% percent full with water/antifreeze, because water doesn't compress. Air does, so it you hit something the air will compress. So the tire won't blow up.

Mine are filled with water and bio degradable anti freeze. You also can use beat juice. Just don't use salt because that will rust out the rims in 3 to 5 years.

Grass Cake
08-14-2005, 01:09 PM
My kubota ZTR came from the factory with fluid in the rear tires.

I'm thinking of removing it.

discuss

Envy Lawn Service
08-14-2005, 04:29 PM
I didn't know they came stock with fluid in the tires. But since it did, I wouldn't remove it, not unless everything you cut is pretty much flat.

So my question to you is WHY are you thinking of removing it?
It's not going to take enough off to help with any overweight issues.
But it would be enough to adversely effect traction, especially since it's literally IN the tires.

Oldtimer
08-14-2005, 09:39 PM
Been there, seen that! Don't do it!

We had an eXmark HP in for a hydro problem. When the motion control levers were moved rapidly forward there was a shudder through the entire mower. We couldn't find anything wrong with the hydros or belts but the steering and acceleration response was very slow. We finally discovered the tires had been filled with water.

Oldtimer

Grass Cake
08-15-2005, 04:30 PM
Been there, seen that! Don't do it!

We had an eXmark HP in for a hydro problem. When the motion control levers were moved rapidly forward there was a shudder through the entire mower. We couldn't find anything wrong with the hydros or belts but the steering and acceleration response was very slow. We finally discovered the tires had been filled with water.

Oldtimer


Mine came from the factory with water.

What i have noticed is the inertia from the water seems to push you down slopes. Could be my imagination....but i don't think so.

Grass Cake
08-15-2005, 04:32 PM
I didn't know they came stock with fluid in the tires. But since it did, I wouldn't remove it, not unless everything you cut is pretty much flat.

So my question to you is WHY are you thinking of removing it?
It's not going to take enough off to help with any overweight issues.
But it would be enough to adversely effect traction, especially since it's literally IN the tires.


See my post about the inertia of the water.

Envy Lawn Service
08-15-2005, 04:41 PM
See my post about the inertia of the water.

Ahah... never thought of that possibility.

I have a couple of ideas to share with you when I return from going out to dinner.

mbricker
08-15-2005, 04:43 PM
If anyone is thinking of adding water or some homebrew mix of water/antifreeze to your tractor or mower tires for increased traction, see your local equipment dealers for the recommended fluid. No sense in ruining the rubber or rusting out your rims. Fluid in the drive tires is a common practice on farm tractor tires.

HighGrass
08-15-2005, 05:12 PM
I can see loading your tires if you have a farm tractor, but why a ZTR mower? Seems to me the only real weight you ever need (when you need it) would be in the front tires when you have a bagger.

I have a JD950 that coincidentally had a tire leak the other day. When I went to put air in it, the valve started leaking around the sides. These tires were filled with calcium chloride from the factory and now I may have to replace both rims!!! payup payup

I say stick with air!

shepoutside
08-15-2005, 05:19 PM
Yes, all tires, and that's 8 per tractor, as I run duals, are filled, as I do many hills and slopes :)

Bush Hog
08-15-2005, 11:17 PM
Bush Hog offers a weight kit for the rear of their ZTR's. It consist of three 1x6x18 pieces of steel plate, weighs about 100 lbs. Installs just behind the engine, down low under the chassis. I have their M2561 model and it seemed to want to spin more than I liked. I work at a steel fabrication plant and we merely copied the Bush Hog design. We installed them on my mower, my Dad's and my boss's mower at the same time. We all agree that it did help a lot with traction, especially on slopes. The controls also feel more responsive. None of us are using baggers. The mower felt a little front heavy before the weights, and now it feels more balanced. Sorry for the long post.

Envy Lawn Service
08-15-2005, 11:56 PM
Bush Hog offers a weight kit for the rear of their ZTR's. It consist of three 1x6x18 pieces of steel plate, weighs about 100 lbs. Installs just behind the engine, down low under the chassis. I have their M2561 model and it seemed to want to spin more than I liked. I work at a steel fabrication plant and we merely copied the Bush Hog design. We installed them on my mower, my Dad's and my boss's mower at the same time. We all agree that it did help a lot with traction, especially on slopes. The controls also feel more responsive. None of us are using baggers. The mower felt a little front heavy before the weights, and now it feels more balanced. Sorry for the long post.

Excellent post! In fact, that was the "idea" I was going to post.

Many ZTR's come stock with some sort of rear weights to improve balance and traction. In fact, both the Lesco Z Two and the Exmark Lazer HP come stock with rear weights.

Also, although my Z Two came stock with rear weights, it still feels very much like you decribe the Bush Hog ZTR. It feels front heavy and that's something I can feel in the seat of my pants when I'm on it. I can feel it "binding up" on unforgiving, uneven terrain. You can feel it start to hang up on indulations and if you are not careful, you will spin when trying to negotiate them. This is where I feel the lack of traction associated with this. It is also very noticeable when attempting turns. If you are not careful, you will spin or pivot on one tire unintentionally.

When I get the chance I will be discussing a few options with the MFG in order to reach a solution without voiding any warranty by modification. Frankly, the Lesco's/Cubs do not have a lot of counter-balance out back because there is very little other than the weights behind the rear tires.... and their deck assembly is very heavy.

strickdad
08-16-2005, 12:02 AM
intresting that no one here knows what goes in the tires.. its not water or antifreeze or a combantion of either one, its calcium chloride.

Envy Lawn Service
08-16-2005, 12:20 AM
Yup, calcium chloride is what they put in tractor tires to "load" them for balast and traction. I believe it is much heavier by volume than water, which helps to get more weight in there to really make a difference.

But isn't calcium chloride also corrosive to the rims?

JimboII
08-16-2005, 12:58 AM
I've recently replaced the rear tires on my Kubota T1760, the OEM tires were filled with liquid. I went to Advance Auto to buy a case of antifreeze and the manager said that when he worked at Quality Farm & Fleet the EPA didn't like any of the present brews and they used windshield washer fluid @ .99 a gallon. I've got 4.5 Gallons in each tire.

Envy Lawn Service
08-16-2005, 01:07 AM
I've recently replaced the rear tires on my Kubota T1760, the OEM tires were filled with liquid. I went to Advance Auto to buy a case of antifreeze and the manager said that when he worked at Quality Farm & Fleet the EPA didn't like any of the present brews and they used windshield washer fluid @ .99 a gallon. I've got 4.5 Gallons in each tire.

What size tires are those?

4.5 Gallons per tire is a good bit, but is it really enough weight to help/notice?
On the other hand, 5 or 6 gallons of gas in my tanks makes a noticeable difference.

Anyways, I've also heard of the popular use of winter windshield washer fluid...
Because it doesn't freeze.

Frankly, for some reason, I still doubt that filling the tires would hurt a drive system because it is free moving liquid weight. But I could be wrong...

Varsity L&G
08-16-2005, 01:10 AM
That is 37.53 per tire which would give you 75.06lbs of low to the ground weight. I would think it would make it more stable.

Calcium Chloride weighs about 75 pounds, per cubic foot

Water weighs about 62 pounds, per cubic foot

Not enough to notice in a mower tire.

Envy Lawn Service
08-16-2005, 01:19 AM
That is 37.53 per tire which would give you 75.06lbs of low to the ground weight. I would think it would make it more stable.

That along with the difference I know I can feel when the gas tanks are full has convinced me to disscuss this with the MFG of my Lesco. If they say it's OK, I might try it.

So, what is a good, non-staining, non-deadly to grass solution that could be used that also has a low freezing point?

It would suck to puncture a tire and stain a hard surface or kill grass.
Likewise, it would also suck to end up with frozen tires one morning deep into leaf season.

Once in the past I considered loading them with something like slime...
But that would cost a fortune from what I have seen.

Varsity L&G
08-16-2005, 01:29 AM
That along with the difference I know I can feel when the gas tanks are full has convinced me to disscuss this with the MFG of my Lesco. If they say it's OK, I might try it.

So, what is a good, non-staining, non-deadly to grass solution that could be used that also has a low freezing point?

It would suck to puncture a tire and stain a hard surface or kill grass.
Likewise, it would also suck to end up with frozen tires one morning deep into leaf season.

Once in the past I considered loading them with something like slime...
But that would cost a fortune from what I have seen.


A liquid such as 28% nitrogen fertilizer, weighs 10.65 lbs./gallon
One cubic foot of manure weighs about 62 pounds :waving: