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Tadams
08-16-2005, 01:11 PM
A guy calls me the other day to come look at his yard and give hime a price. I tell him I'll be there at 4:00. We get there and he is not there so we look around. The turf is all bermuda, the lot is about 2/3 of turf with a fairly steep bank in the back yard, about 300 feet of edging (curb, sidewalk, drive, and path to house from drive) and it's at about 4.5" tall, plus the yard was soaking wet from the irrigation system that had probably just turned off. This house was in a subdivision where the prices go from 250K up to 750K. I called the guy and told him that it would be $60 every week or $90 every 2 weeks and that I would recomend every week for the health of the turf, blah, blah, blah. Well, he said that was a little more than he thought it would be and asked if that included edging and blowing. I told him that I always do that and it is included in the price. He then asked how much it would be if I didn't do that and I told him that it is my company's policy to do that on all of our properties so we couldn't lower the price. This is just another example of someone trying to keep up with the Jones' and living outside of their means. He lives in a 500K house and probably drives a $500 car.

Sorry, just had to rant and rave about that :realmad:

chimmygew
08-16-2005, 01:26 PM
The sad part is that there are plenty more people out there where he came from. Just gotta sort through all the bad ones to get to the ones that actually care about good service.

i_plant_art
08-16-2005, 02:33 PM
the best ones i have found are in early spring time when its still cook enough ouitside to be drinking coffee, and all that jazz in the middle of the day, roll up meet with them give them the estimate of lets says a modest $45 for a 1/4 acres lot (we'd be in and out in 20 minutes). Then they flip out over hearing $45 and want to haggle you 2, 3 , 5 dollars all the while standing there drinking a $6 cup of starbucks coffee. for people like that i aint willing to budge on my prices. take it or leave it.

i did have one this last year like Tadams had told him it would be $70 he said is i could do it for 60 and prune 2 tall shrubs 3x each year he would use us...... i went ahead and did it cause he was really nice and seemed really genuine. plus it came from a referal from a friend that does irrigation. turns out after signing this guy up the next week he calls and wants us to do all of his rental houses plus his mothers houses. now cause i dropped him $10 i got 6 other yards off him all ranging from from 40-60 a week. so sometime i will drop some people if they are nice and genuine and other times i wont if they give me a headache.

scholzee
08-16-2005, 05:06 PM
Did you ever go to a car dealer and they told you the sticker price, and you said ok I'll take it. When you buy your mower you call around and get prices and consider dealer support. Rich get rich by carefully spending their money, give you bid and they can take it or leave it and quit whinning.

Pecker
08-16-2005, 05:45 PM
Good point scholzee.

Interesting (albeit common) topic though. I'm compelled to point out my philosophy regarding these typical responses from customers - in regards to the differences between tangible and intangible products.

The shopping process differs between the two, primarily because services (intangibles) don't display an MSRP, hence the disgruntlement that people display in discussion of compensation when it comes to lawn service, plumber services, and even physician services. IMO, part of that disgruntlement comes from the lack of knowledge of the "behind the scenes" resources it takes to provide a service.

Its easy to see why a washing machine costs $500 when you look at the materials, motors, wiring harnesses, features, warehouses, shipping, show rooms, advertising, salespersons, etc.

It takes a little more effort to illuminate the costs of attending med school, the long hours of studying, internship, stresses, malpractice insurance, administrative costs (i.e. to collect money from Medicare/Medicaid), brick and mortor, diagnostic equipment, nurses, . . ., . . ., . . . to name a few; or in our case the equipment, truck, trailer, maintenance, repairs, insurance, taxes, licenses, etc.

Just a thought. . .

scholzee
08-16-2005, 06:45 PM
REKCEP (it would not let me type your screen name) good insight and thoughts I did not think of it like that, now I know
what you mean but have become more confused. Most rich or well off people "should" have more education and experiences and "should" understand how businesses and behind the scenes costs come into play. So they "should" be easier to sell a quality service to for the proper price. Maybe we tend to remember the jerks and forget about the ones that never complain.

Pecker
08-16-2005, 06:56 PM
Good points Sholzee and thank you. . .

Good point about the more educated folks with knowledge of business operations. Which brings up another facet - the title of the post says "rich" people. I think Tadams hit it on the head when he made the comment about people living above their means to appear rich and gaining their materials by pinching every penny (then again, to alot of people it is just a game they play to see what they can get out of it) . . .so many variables at play in situations such as these. . .very good observations though. . .

Dashunde
08-16-2005, 08:02 PM
The rich are rich for a reason...

Although, $250k - $750K is not "rich"... it's normally "educated".
Hell... my house is $459K and I am faaaaar from "rich", but I am tight with the funds.
Spending wisely (aka tightass) is the only way I can afford what I have.

HOOLIE
08-16-2005, 08:53 PM
The guy drives a $500 car? Did you mean $500 per month?