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View Full Version : how long does it take, to get a lawn in shape?


bobbygedd
08-17-2005, 11:00 AM
you take over a lawn that someone else has massacred. you take over in fall. the lawn is infested with crabgrass, broadleafs, and unhealthy grass. you start the process this fall, how long will it take, before that lawn is " a beautiful lawn", holds its color, and fights off weeds and disease, and holds up well during drought/heat conditions. how long do you think, taking into consideration weather, and customer stupidity (not watering, watering too much, etc). how long do you tell them? one year, 2 yrs?

DUSTYCEDAR
08-17-2005, 11:05 AM
3 years to have a nice lawn

wojo23323
08-17-2005, 11:26 AM
3 years to have a nice lawn

I agree.......

South Florida Lawns
08-17-2005, 11:48 AM
If you really want to have it looking good and you stay on top of your fert/pesticides plus make sure the customer waters as specified, then I say in one growing season you should be able to turn around a lawn.
I had one customer that I picked up and they had bugs and weeds galore, basically needed re-sodding. But instead I started applications and kept them up on watering within one year it completely turned around. If you work hard it wont take that long.

Cimarron Landscape
08-17-2005, 01:37 PM
It depends....completely.
Let's say they had zoysia. It'd take at least 4 years, due to the slow growth.

Bermuda...probably a lot less due to the fast growth. Weeds are a prob. though.

It also all depends on the Ph. Here in Texas, 6.0 is perfect to grow everything.
Depends on what they've put on in the past. Did anything hurt the lawn?

I'd say with St. Augustine, if you had a sprinkler system and watered religiously, you would be able to turn the lawn around in 2 years. I'm doing it at my house :)
~Brian

dmc456
08-17-2005, 01:47 PM
4 weeks...kill and reseed.

fga
08-17-2005, 02:11 PM
7 years and counting..

sheshovel
08-17-2005, 02:38 PM
1 season replace lawn.

rodfather
08-17-2005, 02:43 PM
2-3 unless you kill it off completetly and start off fresh IMO

Gr grass n Hi tides
08-17-2005, 03:01 PM
The 2-3 is the safest thing to say. Assuming you're gonna work with what they've got and not kill everything off. 2 yrs. though is probably what it would take. I'd tell them it's gonna get worse before it gets better, but they should then see steady improvement. Plant some winter rye too. Keep em looking good for a long, long time over the cold months.

PR Fect
08-17-2005, 03:12 PM
How much money do they have to spend? PR

dvmcmrhp52
08-17-2005, 03:16 PM
18 months to 2 years depending on the customer.
I'm talking about a healthy lawn that can resist drought, not a truebrown chemlawn...............

dmc456
08-17-2005, 03:37 PM
Here is what you need, kill and reseed. See below.

dmc456
08-17-2005, 03:39 PM
Takes about 3-4 weeks.

Grass is TTTF. Use Confederate or Confederate plus if fungus is a problem in the area. Conf Plus has blue grass mixed in so the grass does not get too dense allowing it to breath in the summer humidity.

Brianslawn
08-17-2005, 11:01 PM
2 days. boxblade and lay new sod

topsites
08-17-2005, 11:04 PM
You can make a BIG difference by starting with a treatment in the next month, such as an all-around weed-killer right now followed by core aeration / lime / fert / seed in 30 days and it will show by spring but to get it A+, yes I think 2-3 years has been my experience as well.
In addition, I've done many lawns full of weeds and all I did is the aeration / etc without the weed-killer and the customer was tickled pink, didn't care there were still SOME weeds because I will say this: *ALL* lawns have SOME weeds.

Scotts' Yard Care
08-17-2005, 11:41 PM
We had and old guy who was a member of the grind it down to prevent weeds and then douse it with chemicals school of thought. We refused to mow too short even though he got downright hostile about and we would probably have lost the lawn if he could of found some other service to do it at the time. We continued to mow it properly, he applied his own weed killer
and the lawn was looking good for a few years. Then, of course the older couple sold the place and the people who bought it started the grind it down program so the lawn was dead and weedy within a season. :cry: Not our worry after that I guess but it still rankles.

Killswitch
08-17-2005, 11:52 PM
If it takes some of you guys three years to turn a lawn around then you're in the wrong business with all due respect.

Of course it depends on what the client is willing to do, but from the description of the lawn in the first post with some good slit seeding, and proper control of weeds and crabgrass etc, mowing high, aeration this lawn would look 100% better by May first.

Now is the time to slit seed by the way, or at least by labor day.

Even an aeration and serious overseed with perennial rye would help this lawn tremendously.

Hells bells guys even if the lawn isnt loaded with bare spots or grub damage or whatever just proper feedings, proper mowings, and good controls would make this deal look a ton better.

I dont know where you get the three year deal at all.

Varsity L&G
08-17-2005, 11:59 PM
Here is what you need, kill and reseed. See below.

Damn, that looks good!

What was the total materials cost and how long has that lawn been growing.

Approx size?

Jason Rose
08-18-2005, 12:02 AM
I'm a little shocked at 3 years as well... All things considered, as long as the grass is there and halfway decent already, though has crabrass and broadleafs infesting it, you should be able to have it looking great by the next spring. (since you got it in the fall) I have done many that way. Crabgrass and weed infested and I take them on in late summer. The next spring I do the usual app or barricade + fert, then spray for broadleafs then another app of barricade + fert. Providing that the grass is there to begin with it will usually look 100% better without the weeds.

If the turf is too thin to recover then it's a whole different ballgame, but that wasn't the question.

Honestly it's amazing the effect that weekly scheduled good quality mowing has on a lawn. I have seen many that look like hell with the homeowners mowing and all I do is cut it once a week and it improves 150% in a short time.

Killswitch
08-18-2005, 12:11 AM
Yeah right on Dmc. Good job. Ive also seen some hydroseeding jobs work very well but you need a clean surface for the most part.

dvmcmrhp52
08-18-2005, 12:11 AM
If it takes some of you guys three years to turn a lawn around then you're in the wrong business with all due respect.

Of course it depends on what the client is willing to do, but from the description of the lawn in the first post with some good slit seeding, and proper control of weeds and crabgrass etc, mowing high, aeration this lawn would look 100% better by May first.

Now is the time to slit seed by the way, or at least by labor day.

Even an aeration and serious overseed with perennial rye would help this lawn tremendously.

Hells bells guys even if the lawn isnt loaded with bare spots or grub damage or whatever just proper feedings, proper mowings, and good controls would make this deal look a ton better.

I dont know where you get the three year deal at all.



No, we're not in the wrong business we just define getting a lawn in shape differently.
It takes time to establish a good root system and a healthy lawn. Period.
Tell me why it takes a sod farm 18 months to produce saleable sod under very ideal conditions............There's a reason for it.

Killswitch
08-18-2005, 12:17 AM
Honestly it's amazing the effect that weekly scheduled good quality mowing has on a lawn. I have seen many that look like hell with the homeowners mowing and all I do is cut it once a week and it improves 150% in a short time.


Goes back to cultural practices. Mowing at 2.5 sharp blades, not mowing too fast, proper feeding and controls and you'd be surprised.

Not only does mowing tall make the lawn look better, and give natural weed and crabgrass control due to thickness, it also pays off when it gets hot and dry withstanding the stress better especially if unwatered turf.

Plus theres something to cut when it hasnt rained in two weeks in July as opposed to the lawns that are fried because youve been scalping it since April.

Hell just simply mowing high can turn a lot of lawns around.

:shrugs:

mcwlandscaping
08-18-2005, 12:20 AM
Goes back to cultural practices. Mowing at 2.5 sharp blades, not mowing too fast, proper feeding and controls and you'd be surprised.

Not only does mowing tall make the lawn look better, and give natural weed and crabgrass control due to thickness, it also pays off when it gets hot and dry withstanding the stress better especially if unwatered turf.

Plus theres something to cut when it hasnt rained in two weeks in July as opposed to the lawns that are fried because youve been scalping it since April.

Hell just simply mowing high can turn a lot of lawns around.

:shrugs:
i agree, i do my lawn that way, looks awsome!!!

Killswitch
08-18-2005, 12:23 AM
Not to be rude but if you rounded the lawn up today, aerify the hell out of it, broadcast with perennial rye, and slit seeded(crosscut pattern) apply a starter fert by Labor day, and can be sure its irrigated and mowed properly, that lawn will be beautiful and mature by June next year.

Thats for "beautiful" For much improved which could very well be satisfactory or better to the client considering the expense and watering requirement especially if no system exists can be obtained with the basics.

How big is this lawn?

Is it irrigated?

Whats the soil like?

dmc456
08-18-2005, 11:36 AM
Damn, that looks good!

What was the total materials cost and how long has that lawn been growing.

Approx size?

Direct material cost is 10lb / 1000sqft at $0.82 / lb of seed = $8.20 / 1000 sqft or estimate $10 / 1000 direct material cost. I charge any where from $60 - $150 per 1000 sqft. I charge what I think i can get the customer to pay. The trick is watering. I purchased over 100 programable irrigation timers to do the watering for 3-4 weeks which make the grass start to sprout in about 6 days in September. Timers are expensive, but the results are worth the expense in my opinion. The first fall I made no profit. Everything went to purchasing the timers. Now, I rake it in. Its basically getting paid to advertise. I go after the worst lawns, put in my yard sign and do the work. People just start calling.

The attached picture is 4 weeks after seeding. Blades are still very thin but thick turf. This summer the grass felt like you were walking on springs. I already signed neighbors on boths sides and across the street for this fall. I will probably do about 30-40 of these this fall.

Summer drought hurts the bottom line during the summer due to lack of mowing, but the fall seeding and additional new customer for next season more than pays for the lack of work during droughts.

I currently don't do irrigation systems, but plan on starting in the spring because I keep turning down work. If anyone wants to trade secretes on seeding for irrigation send me a PM. Preferable someone locally or willing to travel to teach. I would like to help install one, or have someone help me install one on my property.

dmc456
08-18-2005, 11:39 AM
Here are more pictures.

Before

dmc456
08-18-2005, 11:41 AM
After picture

dmc456
08-18-2005, 11:44 AM
How big is this lawn?

Is it irrigated?

Whats the soil like?

Lawn is only irrigiated as shown in picture during seeding.

Lawn is ~9,500 sqft of turf

Soil is CLAY, CLAY, CLAY....good for selling aerations.

arborist-28
08-18-2005, 12:12 PM
2 complete growing seasons if you stay on top of it .. c

Killswitch
08-18-2005, 08:33 PM
;)

I dunno man. I just dont get it.

Heres a guy showing you photos of a lawn he resurected from the grave in six months basically and Im telling you it can be done and you guys still say it takes 2 years.

*shrugs*

MMLawn
08-18-2005, 09:30 PM
Three years??? Takes ONE DAY.............................















Bobcat it to scoop up exsisting lawn, grade it and new sod.................start by 7AM and have everything including sod on hand, enough employees and you should be done by 5PM............... :laugh:

dvmcmrhp52
08-18-2005, 10:39 PM
;)

I dunno man. I just dont get it.

Heres a guy showing you photos of a lawn he resurected from the grave in six months basically and Im telling you it can be done and you guys still say it takes 2 years.

*shrugs*



Ya except that particular lawn will not make it through a drought without constant watering. The root sytem is not established enough to say anything different.

Creating a good looking lawn is easy, creating a healthy lawn is a different story.

Please tell me once again why it takes a sod farm 18 months to produce saleable sod.................Are they in the wrong business as well?

Killswitch
08-18-2005, 11:01 PM
First of all I bet sod farms dont mature it 18 months and they sell whats basically root bound way over fertilized turf that IMHO isnt the healthy turf you speak of.

Im not sure where you draw the lines betwixt whats good looking and whats healthy or how you can even differentiate the difference.

Lawn care isnt a big secret and science. Its nutrients, good cultural and mechanical methods IE watering, mowing, aerating , weed /insect and crabgrass control...etc.

dvmcmrhp52
08-18-2005, 11:07 PM
O.K., whatever.


Chemlawn creates good looking lawns in no time...............until the rain stops falling for a short period of time.

If you don't know the difference after being in business for 20 years (according to your profile) then I don't guess I can explain it well enough.

all ferris
08-18-2005, 11:09 PM
6 months at the most