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View Full Version : Where to get rid of dirt


neversatisfiedj
09-15-2005, 09:17 AM
from excavation. Its the worst part of the job./ I am getting tired of paying 55.00 a ton to get rid of good dirt. Where do you guys get rid of fill ?

Squizzy246B
09-15-2005, 09:28 AM
Its a matter of networking with other operators. There is always somebody who needs some fill and somebody who needs some removed....but mostly at different times :cry: so when you solve the problem let me know :rolleyes:

stumper1620
09-15-2005, 09:58 AM
from excavation. Its the worst part of the job./ I am getting tired of paying 55.00 a ton to get rid of good dirt. Where do you guys get rid of fill ?
If its clean fill, check with all your local landscape suppliers incl. the ones that cater to DIYs, heck, seems to me most would be willing to hold free fill to sell cheap or give to customers that are good future prospects for business. or maybe they would post a signup sheet for delivery of fill as it becomes availible.then all you need to do is match a need to a load.

mbella
09-15-2005, 11:14 AM
$55.00 a ton? That can add up fast. I deal with this is a few ways.

1. Look for ways to enhance the property where you are working with the soil. This is my favorite. I don't have to haul it and it usually ends with a nice add on.

2. Rent a dumpster. This is my second favorite, although not always convenient from a logistical standpoint. We haven't needed one in a while, but last time I checked, I think we were paying $350.00 for a fully loaded 20 yarder. That's a flat fee if it's clean dirt.

3. Find people that want it. Locally, there is another landscaper that is always looking for fill. Also, there is an excavating contractor that has a screen, so he'll take it too. The downside is you have to deal with the hauling.

You have to be resourceful. If we are working in a new area and I can't get rid of the fill on site and can't get a dumpster, I'll drive around like a mad person and stop at every contractor's shop, farm, etc. until I find something. I wouldn't pay $55.00 a ton.

Itsgottobegreen
09-15-2005, 04:42 PM
Get a dump truck. Haul it yourself and still charge the customer $55 a ton. You will make a killing. Then haul it to the local landscape supply yard.

My supplier was like you can borrow my Mack 10 wheeler dump and driver if you want to. When I told him about a job that we might have to remove 150 yards of fill dirt. Then he asked if my skid loader would load it, which it won't. So he said I also can borrow his JD 280 skid loader. He will take fill dirt for free if he hauls it. Pay you if you haul in a large amount of it.

DVS Hardscaper
09-15-2005, 05:22 PM
Many land owners are looking for fill dirt. I need about another 50 cu yds for my own property!

Swimming pool companies usually know where to dispose of it.

You just gotta keep your eyes peeled for signs/ads that say "Fill Dirt" or "Clean Fill" Wanted.

Aso, there are web sites where people list sites that accept fill.

motoraced
09-15-2005, 05:53 PM
on contract..."all excavation material remains on site unless otherwise noted."
otherwise note...."pay me to remove it."

mbella
09-15-2005, 06:43 PM
on contract..."all excavation material remains on site unless otherwise noted."
otherwise note...."pay me to remove it."

At what point of the sales process do you address the issue of the excavated material?

mbella
09-15-2005, 06:55 PM
[QUOTE=Itsgottobegreen]Get a dump truck. Haul it yourself and still charge the customer $55 a ton. You will make a killing. QUOTE]

In general, not a good strategy. Let's say we're bidding on the same project. I am going to utilize a dumpster to dispose of the excavated material and you use your method. My charge to remove 20 yards= $350.00. Your charge to remove 20 yards=$1540.00.

Green-Pro
09-15-2005, 08:17 PM
Around here clean fill dirt is an easy sell, fetches a good price and seems to be hard to find when needed. I find any way possible to bring it to my shop site and store with the rest of outside materials, within reason of course. Charge for hauling off is at best a minimum to cover fuel expenses related to hauling, as the fill brings in more dang money than any disposal fee would bring.

Mike's idea of using it on existing prop. is a good one also, especially as an add on.

-Geoff

kris
09-15-2005, 08:26 PM
No one would want to buy the crap we are excavating.... clay, sod, cut bricks, etc etc

We have been lucky because a house down the street from the shop has been taking our spoils for 3 years ....we go down every 200 cu/yards or so and push it in the hole for him. It is just about filled up now and I have another place lined up.

Any real clean dirt we take out to the tree farm to fill up holes.

I'm like Mike...I would look high and low before paying 55 a ton.

neversatisfiedj
09-16-2005, 07:39 AM
Thanks guys. I just started this year. I have learned alot and have alot more to learn.

Electra_Glide
09-16-2005, 12:37 PM
At what point of the sales process do you address the issue of the excavated material?
I deal with it right up front in my proposal. I always list "off-site hauling" as an exclusion. Before it goes to contract, we discuss a rate for hauling and that's what goes in the contract if the customer desires.

As somebody else already suggested, I try and keep it "on-site" as much as possible (less headaches). Otherwise, there's always somebody looking for fill.

I did a job a few months back where I paid $50 per load (tandem dump at about 15 ton/load) to have it hauled in by one of the local excavation contractors. Dirt probably had to be hauled about 5-10 miles.

Most of the landscape supply houses around here that sell fill dirt usually get between $12 - $18 per ton, plus delivery :dizzy:.

Joe

neversatisfiedj
09-16-2005, 01:29 PM
Why not just put haul fees right on the bottom line. Why an exclusion ? you know about how much is coming out. Customers DON'T like hidden fees. They want a clear cut price for a job.

Electra_Glide
09-16-2005, 06:41 PM
Why not just put haul fees right on the bottom line. Why an exclusion ? you know about how much is coming out. Customers DON'T like hidden fees. They want a clear cut price for a job.
Never said anything about a hidden fee. One of the first questions I ask when I look at a job is "What do you want me to do with the dirt?" I list it on my proposal, highlight it, and discuss it with the homeowner prior to signing the contract. Nothing hidden about it. I also consider it an opportunity to "upsell" additional services.

Joe

mbella
09-16-2005, 06:44 PM
I also consider it an opportunity to "upsell" additional services.

Joe


Absolutely!!!!

TURF DOCTOR
09-16-2005, 07:22 PM
You might try a big hole.

1idejim
01-15-2014, 10:11 AM
You have to become very creative to dispose of 150+ cyds per day while keeping the machines running steady and the trucks next to the hole.

Spoils removal is one of the toughest (and getting tougher) portions of the job. Grading permits are required for fills greater than 2 feet in most areas. Stockpiling requires property acquisition or ownership. Farms and ranches are usually a far piece to travel.

The trick is to seek these sites out during the off season, maintain and nurture the dump sites and get an agreement with the land owner for exclusive rights. I wound up grading other peoples spoils for a week on one site, never again.
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Murphy's Law
01-15-2014, 11:52 AM
I'm going on record as this is the oldest revived thread I've seen. Nice work "digging" it up!

I use craigslist when I'm further than 5 or 6 miles from one of my regular dump sites. People jump on that like crazy. Some even offer to pay you! Heck, last year I got paid $100 to dump about 9 yards of spoils then another $200 to spread it. Dump site was 3 minutes from the job. I finished the job on a Friday afternoon, went and graded out the soil and had "walking around money" for the weekend!

Injured LCO
01-16-2014, 08:59 PM
Around here clean fill dirt is an easy sell, fetches a good price and seems to be hard to find when needed. I find any way possible to bring it to my shop site and store with the rest of outside materials, within reason of course. Charge for hauling off is at best a minimum to cover fuel expenses related to hauling, as the fill brings in more dang money than any disposal fee would bring.

Mike's idea of using it on existing prop. is a good one also, especially as an add on.

-Geoff

how do you create it as an add-on?
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GreenI.A.
01-16-2014, 11:55 PM
I'm going on record as this is the oldest revived thread I've seen. Nice work "digging" it up!

I use craigslist when I'm further than 5 or 6 miles from one of my regular dump sites. People jump on that like crazy. Some even offer to pay you! Heck, last year I got paid $100 to dump about 9 yards of spoils then another $200 to spread it. Dump site was 3 minutes from the job. I finished the job on a Friday afternoon, went and graded out the soil and had "walking around money" for the weekend!

I do the same. I put an add up on craigslist saying "Free Fill", I usually state we have loading equipment on site and will load dump trucks for free. Or can deliver for a charge. Last summer we pulled 750 tons out of a site, some of the contractors were coming with multiple trucks and their own trailers to speed up the loading process.

Armsden&Son
01-17-2014, 01:52 AM
It's nice to have friends with acreage....

Impact-Vector
01-19-2014, 10:12 PM
In summer I land up paying for dirt almost always..I think I pay $70 a load :/

In winter I seem to easily find fill. I found some amazing stuff for free. The guy even delivered 200 tandems and didn't cost me a cent!

There is a lot near mine I wish I owned. Looks like it would be amazing with a few hundred loads :/