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yrdandgardenhandyman
10-03-2005, 09:24 AM
I have a chance to pick up a 1972 Ford 1 ton truck with dump box for les than $800.00. Runs well, transmission good, body good, hydraulics tight and clean. Needs a rear end.
My question is, does owning a truck like this really enhance the business opportunities? Is it worth it to own a dump box? I already have 2 pickup trucks, both half ton. This would be used only when there is something to haul, ie mulch, rock, etc.

Ironmower
10-03-2005, 10:02 AM
Sounds like a pretty good deal if you ask me. A F-350 of that vintage IIRC has a Dana 70 rearend. You can have it rebuilt if you can't find a new one.

If you feel like decoding the VIN on it, visit www.fordification.com . That is a site specifically dedicated to the restoration of 1967-1972 Ford F-100 through F-350 trucks.

Gravel Rat
10-03-2005, 02:10 PM
If the old truck is in good shape go for it but you should upgrade the front brakes to disks the old front and rear drum brakes don't stop very well. As for a rebuilt rear it might be a spicer 70 being that old. It might be cheaper to find a Dana 70 out of a 77-79 Ford and change the whole housing etc.

Depending on how good the dump body is in the body its self is worth 800 dollars all depending on condition.

If you have a landscape company and you have never had a dump once you get one you can't live without one.

Smalltimer1
10-03-2005, 03:07 PM
If the old truck is in good shape go for it but you should upgrade the front brakes to disks the old front and rear drum brakes don't stop very well. As for a rebuilt rear it might be a spicer 70 being that old. It might be cheaper to find a Dana 70 out of a 77-79 Ford and change the whole housing etc.

The best way to put front disc brakes on a 67-72 F-series truck is to find a 73-79 F-series truck and swap the I-beams (preferably off a parts vehicle). They will directly interchange and you can find them all over the place.

It should be a Dana 70 according to the chart from http://www.fordification.com/data-1972.htm .

Let me know if I can be of any further assistance.

Gravel Rat
10-03-2005, 06:25 PM
My dads old 75 F-350 wouldn't stop at all with the old drum brakes on the front so he swapped out the old drums for disks out of a 78 F-250 it increased the braking power alot. The truck ended up with regular wheels on the front but it worked.

xcopterdoc
10-03-2005, 07:04 PM
72 was a good year for Ford trucks. What engine does it have?
The stopping capability of these old trucks is pretty good even with drums IF you do it right. Many folks nowadays dont know how to do a proper brake job on drum brakes anymore.
That being said.. if you go the route of switching brakes from drum to disc on the front.. do as suggested and get a donor front end and swap it out. You will need the master cylinder, lines and hoses, and the proportial valve to make it all work right.
The Dana/Spicer rears are easy to rebuild and parts are plentiful if the housing isnt ruined.

yrdandgardenhandyman
10-03-2005, 08:12 PM
72 was a good year for Ford trucks. What engine does it have?

The Dana/Spicer rears are easy to rebuild and parts are plentiful if the housing isnt ruined.


According to the vin, it's a 360. Has a gvw of 10000 lbs. Not a lot of rust. The frame and all the hydraulic hoses, cylinder and mounts look real solid. I haven't talked to the owner yet. My brother in law told me about the truck and it is only a block and a half from my house. It is owned by a plumbing company. They are asking $800.00 OBO and it has been there all summer. I need to do a little more research to find out what I need to get it on the road. I guess the next step is to call the owner. Thanks for the input. Keep it coming.

Gravel Rat
10-03-2005, 08:41 PM
The 360 Ford engine is a pig it wasn't one of Ford's best it will do the job but its a real gas guzzler. The 390 which is next size FE block was a far better engine more power it had 255hp and 376lbft where the 360 had 215hp and 327ftlb. The short stroke made the 360 a POS which caused it to get worse fuel mileage than the 390 they both had the same bore size.

As for the major rust problem the 70s Fords all had problems with the inner fender rusting out mainly around the top of the cowl where the hood bolts on. The cab corners are bad for rusting through and in that year cab mounts.

The old 70s trucks in this area are pretty slim the orange cancer has pretty much taken the life of most of them. I used to have a 79 F-150 4x4 a 78 F-250 ext cab 4x4 and a 77 F-350 dually with a 79 Front clip I don't have any of them anymore. I would like to have a 79 F-250-350 4x4 reg cab LB with 4spd again but they are hard to find. With the price of fuel nowwadays a person couldn't afford to drive one.

yrdandgardenhandyman
10-03-2005, 09:04 PM
The 360 Ford engine is a pig it wasn't one of Ford's best it will do the job but its a real gas guzzler.


So what kind of mileage are we talking about? Would a price of $600.00 make up for the difference and make it worth it?

Smalltimer1
10-03-2005, 10:05 PM
So what kind of mileage are we talking about? Would a price of $600.00 make up for the difference and make it worth it?

A 360 will get 10mpg tops. I never really liked the 360 for anything other than the fact that it is a reliable engine.

The 360 was a truck only engine (not available in cars) as designated by Ford and as such they put a truck/torque cam in it and ran a 2bbl carb on them, which is what pigged them out on fuel. Pretty much any of the mods that you can do to a 390 can be done to a 360. Mainly I would put a 4bbl intake & carb on as well as a newer towing cam from a mfg. such as Edelbrock or Crane.

Let me just add on that at that price, if the truck was taken care of and in good shape, I'd be on it like white on rice. :D

UNISCAPER
10-04-2005, 12:38 AM
I once got one of those $800.00 Ford dump trucks myself. It had a 390. And, it needed brakes. Unless you can find good bone yard parts, plan on $1,000.00 for rotors, loaded calipers, rear shoes, wheel cylinders, brake hardware, and drums. Later we added a master cylinder for another $100.00. And, pray that no one ever did a 3/4 to one ton rear end conversion. We basically had a 3/4 ton truck, with a one ton dually rear. The rotors and calipers on the one ton won't work on the 3/4, and after 2 days flipping parts back and fourth, we finally got it right.

On that series Ford, (330,360,390, all the same block) if every gasket on the engine is leaking, there is a good indication it needs rings. Milage was hitting 8 on a good day around town.

So, you have to ask youself, what are your limitaitons on this truck, and where do you start, and stop on doing any work and still make it worth while. A bone yard rear will hit you for $300 and up. My gut says you offer $300.00 for the truck or walk, because by the time you put even $600.00 in it, you got a rear endd, and all the hardware, then all the other unsaid stuff that is in need of repair. When it is all said and done, you could have put $10K on something alot newer and had something that worked better for your needs. Unless of course you are up for a project.

General Landscaping
10-04-2005, 12:54 AM
Get it on the road and make your $1200? back...... from that point, you can evaluate your need for a dumptruck and start looking for something newer.

It's not like you are going to be locked into a 7 year payment and plan on keeping it forever. If it sucks some gas, that means it's getting used payup

Look at it as a stepping stone.

Smalltimer1
10-04-2005, 12:55 AM
I like to see working classics. It takes my mind back to what it must have been like to have these old workhorses around earning their keep every day.

Jpocket
10-06-2005, 12:01 AM
I wouldn't fool with a truck that old unless it was a good ol' Chevy or GMC

Smalltimer1
10-06-2005, 12:19 AM
I wouldn't fool with a truck that old unless it was a good ol' Chevy or GMC


What makes a Chevy or GMC any better at that age? ;) Personally I still see many late-60's and early 70's Ford dumps than I do Chevys. Most of the Chevys of that vintage here are trailer queens, while the Fords are still working away.

yrdandgardenhandyman
10-06-2005, 01:00 AM
I wouldn't fool with a truck that old unless it was a good ol' Chevy or GMC


Thanks for this advice. It was very helpful. :laugh: Especially since I have always been a Ram man. Mopar.
Seriously though, I think the older Fords held up as well as any GM and better than any IHC or Mopar. As old as this truck is, I know I will have limited use for it but I am looking at it as a springboard. Before I spend tens of thousands on a newer dump, I want to test the waters with this one. That way I only risk a few hundred dollars on a probable but unsure venture.
Thanks.

UNISCAPER
10-06-2005, 01:08 AM
I agree with any truck that year going to have it's issues. Ford partcularly had i beam issues. Show me one of those things that did not have sticky king pins, or bent I beams when it needed to be aligned and you got a truck that sat a long time.

Every I beamed Ford is a bear to align. Chevys in those years had spring and shock issues. Corn pickers rusted in half though they would still run well.

Gravel Rat
10-06-2005, 02:08 AM
I would have to see the truck before I could make a judgement of value on it but like I said already if the dump body is in good shape its worth atleast 500 dollars. To replace the diff you will be looking at a grand minimum which will be the most expensive part to replace.

The truck is probably running old bias ply tires so you will have to find a set of wheels off of a 1980 F-350 to run radial tires.

Just use common sense if you feel you will have to dump a bunch of money into it to make it road worthy you might want to find something else.

xcopterdoc
10-06-2005, 10:19 PM
I will agree somewhat Bill on the I-Beam alignment issues. But damn they sure give a smooth ride compared to the straight axle! The older one ton Fords have a straight axle front end and not the twin I-Beam I do believe.
Tweeking the I-Beams for camber is a lost art nowadays, we never did worry about caster. When they did away with the kingpins and went to ball joints on the I-Beam frontends we could then adjust for caster and camber by using an offset ball joint, most would give you a degree plus or minus depending how you installed it. I have a 67 F-100 that only had the beams reset once in 650,000 miles for camber. Not bad I'd say. Better than shimming as we had/have to do with many of the GM's. I guess I'm kinda partial to the old Fords. To each his own! As with any older truck,regardless of the make, they aint for the faint of heart or meant to be owned by a non wrench turning owner, thats for sure!

Smalltimer1
10-07-2005, 12:00 AM
I agree with any truck that year going to have it's issues. Ford partcularly had i beam issues. Show me one of those things that did not have sticky king pins, or bent I beams when it needed to be aligned and you got a truck that sat a long time.

Every I beamed Ford is a bear to align. Chevys in those years had spring and shock issues. Corn pickers rusted in half though they would still run well.

Lots of kingpins to this day upon replacement have to be pressed out due to forming/shaping to the metal around it from the stresses of normal everyday driving. I have never seen an older F-250/350 with bent I-beams unless it was grossly overloaded, though I know of a right good many of F-100's that had some bent, just because of being grossly overloaded on a regular basis, which was mostly the case on farm trucks where they put 2 tons of fertilizer and seed on the back and expect it to handle it like a one ton flatbed. Never much of a problem though. Usually you can shim up the camber adjustment on them without much trouble.

Most of the GM trucks at that point with the A-arm type front ends had problems with bushings, as one of ours from that era has just had the front end rebuilt (new bushings/tie rod ends/shocks/etc. installed) at a cost of about $800, only 130k on that particular truck, believe it's an '83 C-10, though most of its life has been spent off the road on the farm. I've driven it to the grain mill with 3500lbs. of wheat in the back and the bumper pretty much almost dragging the ground before and you know that truck isn't meant for that kind of work but you make what's available work, glad those days are over, cause now we have the dump truck for that kind of hauling.

Smalltimer1
10-07-2005, 12:35 AM
Just for some good historical reading, I threw this in as I just ran across it a few minutes ago:

http://www.fordification.com/lit/71Ford-vs-Chevy-brochure.htm

olderthandirt
10-07-2005, 01:10 AM
forget the truck it will cost a lot more than you think to make it rd. worthy. Brake lines are probably rusted through, wheel cylinders etc. find a good used dump trailor in a smaller size for your 1/2 ton to tow and see if theres enough work to justify a newer, reliable truck.

Gravel Rat
10-07-2005, 03:33 AM
The one gravel mine I worked at had a old 1980s F-350 dually welding truck the front wheels were so bent inwards the top of the tires damn near rubbed the coil springs. The twin I beam is okay but its not the best for true carrying capacity nothing beats a mono beam front axle like was used in older trucks and what is used in 88 and newer F-450 Fords and Chevy 3500HD. Also 4x4 trucks with mono beam front axles carry loads better.