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View Full Version : Bigger trailer = more experience?


drsogr
10-03-2005, 10:02 PM
Hey guys I have a 5' x 10' trailer that I use for landscaping projects. Its painted John Deere colors and is easy to pull. Well I was talking to a more experience landscaper, and he told me that if I had a bigger trailer, I would be able to get bigger jobs. Based on the theory that if I had a bigger trailer I would have more experience. It makes sense, but I am really not dyeing to pull around a huge trailer, although sometimes I could use the room! What do you guys think?

Lawn Masters
10-03-2005, 10:29 PM
I dont think people see bigger trailers as more experience, they'll see it in your work's quality. what you haul with, isnt how to measure experience, or skill.

DLS1
10-03-2005, 10:31 PM
Hey guys I have a 5' x 10' trailer that I use for landscaping projects. Its painted John Deere colors and is easy to pull. Well I was talking to a more experience landscaper, and he told me that if I had a bigger trailer, I would be able to get bigger jobs. Based on the theory that if I had a bigger trailer I would have more experience. It makes sense, but I am really not dyeing to pull around a huge trailer, although sometimes I could use the room! What do you guys think?


True but you can also have more experience with the trailer you have by getting more smaller jobs than you get now. So it is either more experience with a smaller or larger trailer but you still need to get the jobs to get the more experience. :D

Jamesgateslandscaping
10-03-2005, 11:02 PM
I Have both :p :cool:
James

DLS1
10-03-2005, 11:10 PM
I Have both :p :cool:
James

Lucky you. Then you have twice the more experience. :D

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
10-05-2005, 11:29 PM
Post a pic of the JD painted trailer!

olderthandirt
10-05-2005, 11:45 PM
Well I was talking to a more experience landscaper, and he told me that if I had a bigger trailer, I would be able to get bigger jobs. Based on the theory that if I had a bigger trailer I would have more experience. It makes sense

Could be you just spent more money to buy a bigger trailor that you might not need :dizzy: Those dam "experienced landscaper" :p

Eclipse
10-07-2005, 10:01 PM
I think the perception of the potential new customer is that if you have a nicer, newer truck and a larger more equipped trailer that you are more expereinced, better at what you do, and more professional.

Is this true, certainly not, but for the potential customers driving by this is their perception.

Remember image is everything.

Of course none of this applies to word of mouth advertising and referrals.

JMHO

Drew Gemma
10-07-2005, 10:19 PM
Their is an old saying to a thought like this: "If you can't be professional you can atleast look it"

nobagger
10-07-2005, 10:22 PM
I honestly think I'm seeing smaller trailers around here (nwpa) smaller trailers= no inspections, less reg. fees, less maintenance, easier to maneuver around etc. But less room, less "head turning ability", well if those are the only two down falls I think I'll stick with my 6.5x12. Its tight but...it fits all of my needs for now. I think if you have a couple of z turns then I don't think you have much of a choice other than a bigger trailer. But I really dont think it helps you get any more jobs. On the other hand I think pulling around a collapsible 4x8 Harbor Freight trailer or wooden home made trailer does you any favors either.

Envy Lawn Service
10-07-2005, 10:26 PM
I have a 6x10 single axle that I use for landscaping projects and I feel it is pretty much ideal for me most of the time. It's not the ideal trailer to most, and also not to me for many other reasons. But I think it rules for many mulch install jobs. I can get several yards of mulch on it at a time, but not so much that it's a crushing load where I take it. Plus once I get it there, I can access the mulch very easily, with less fender in the way because it is single axle... ect... Often I can make close to $200/hr working off this trailer.

The down side to this trailer is that it has gotten unruley with me a few times while loaded to the gills. It is also pure hell to try to back up. And once in a while it ends up being a little short for a long material hauling job.

olderthandirt
10-07-2005, 10:47 PM
I have a 6x10 single axle that I use for landscaping projects and I feel it is pretty much ideal for me most of the time. It's not the ideal trailer to most, and also not to me for many other reasons. But I think it rules for many mulch install jobs. I can get several yards of mulch on it at a time, but not so much that it's a crushing load where I take it. Plus once I get it there, I can access the mulch very easily, with less fender in the way because it is single axle... ect... Often I can make close to $200/hr working off this trailer.

The down side to this trailer is that it has gotten unruley with me a few times while loaded to the gills. It is also pure hell to try to back up. And once in a while it ends up being a little short for a long material hauling job.

Not to hi jack the thread but I made a mulch trailor. 5x8 with 4 ft sides and Ballon tire on it for soft ground. I trailor it to a job and load it with mulch from the dump and then tow the trailor with a quad. Its great for soft ground and its fast to load and unload 2 guys can move 20 yds of mulch in just a few hrs and thats putting it pretty much anywhere.

Envy Lawn Service
10-07-2005, 10:53 PM
That sounds like a good rig Mac.

I found a killer small lawn trailer I plan to add at some point.
I'll see if I can post some info sometime....

nobagger
10-07-2005, 11:08 PM
along the lines of Older's set up has anyone used a dump that you put onto the front of your w/b. It looks like it would hold maybe 2 wheelbarrels full.

olderthandirt
10-07-2005, 11:13 PM
along the lines of Older's set up has anyone used a dump that you put onto the front of your w/b. It looks like it would hold maybe 2 wheelbarrels full.
I've used cement buggys to haul top-soil and there almost the same as you described