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bobbygedd
10-11-2005, 09:45 AM
what's the deal on this: seeded a not so steep slope, but with all the rain comming hard and heavy, immediately after we finished, some of the seed washed down. client is demanding a re-seed. do you?

hoskm01
10-11-2005, 09:48 AM
What does the contract say? You could be a hardazz and say not responsible...act of god...bla bla bla, or cough up a couple bucks and 5 min in seed to keep a happy customer, if they are worth it. Depends on your situation.

bobbygedd
10-11-2005, 09:50 AM
"not responsible for acts of god"...this covers about anything that can happen

Lawn-Scapes
10-11-2005, 09:51 AM
How big of a job and how much seed? Maybe redo for cost of seed only....

hoskm01
10-11-2005, 09:53 AM
They agreed to pay for an application of product in the hope that it would grow for them, given whatever weather would come. You agreed to spread the seed, maybe you guaranteed it would grow or not, I dont know. Easy fix for a customer you might want to keep. What are they worth to you?

nate1422
10-11-2005, 09:54 AM
Throw down a smoke screen....I mean some seed. I have a slope on my yard that I reseeded about 2 weeks ago, the rains came (6") and there was some washout but a lot of the seed is starting to germinate. Just because you see some seed that washed out doesn't necessarily mean that all the seed did.

walker-talker
10-11-2005, 09:58 AM
Had this happen only once...it was for a friend of mine. I had already given him a big break in price and fore-warned him that it was going to rain. I gave him advice on how to fix and sold him some seed at my cost, but that was it.

In your case, I would probably want to help make it right, but there would be a charge involved.

bobbygedd
10-11-2005, 09:58 AM
so let me ask you, why would you absorb the cost, of replacing product, that was destroyed, as the result of an act of god? i'm just curious. i gave the client exactly what i said i would.

Nosmo
10-11-2005, 10:09 AM
It is a touchy situation you have there. If this guy is a good customer and is reasonable you might try bargaining with him.

One approach might be this if you want to keep him happy.
Tell him if you get the seed I will spread it out for you.

Nosmo

PS: I know your contract has a clause covering "Acts of God" . But do you want to keep him or loose him over a few minutes of spreading seed ?

bobbygedd
10-11-2005, 10:28 AM
but nosmo.....if he agreed, and assuming he understood, before signing, that we aren't responsible for acts of god, why would he expect me, to take my hard earned money, from my wallet, to seed HIS LAWN? and why, if i refuse, should i be at risk of losing the client? afterall, you heard geo, we are so poor, my children recieve free meals at school. can't a poor man get a break around here?

PMLAWN
10-11-2005, 10:36 AM
This is a call you have to make based on the client, how much it will cost you to do it compared to not doing it. Also if this is an isolated case, well maybe but if the whole route wants it done than no.
I know around here that the gutters and concrete cracks will have great grass in them in a week or so.

PMLAWN
10-11-2005, 10:43 AM
but nosmo.....if he agreed, and assuming he understood, before signing, that we aren't responsible for acts of god, why would he expect me, to take my hard earned money, from my wallet, to seed HIS LAWN? and why, if i refuse, should i be at risk of losing the client? afterall, you heard geo, we are so poor, my children recieve free meals at school. can't a poor man get a break around here?
It sounds like you know what you are going to do so just do it.
Just know that the client- right or wrong- might see it different.
As your tag states it is dog eat dog so be sure to pet or kick the right dogs.

Bobby- you only see the world and what it has to offer in black and white.
Start to see in color and the world will be a happier place.

( this said in spite of you being one of the most colorful posters on L S)

PMLAWN
10-11-2005, 10:50 AM
But wait---This is Bobby,
He never dropped seed this year and is counting on the rain to be blamed for washing it away. Now he will go back and RESEED at a cost (in accordance with the heavy rain after seeding clause) and again make much more profit at this than me . Brilliant, I will never stop learning from Bobby.

bobbygedd
10-11-2005, 10:53 AM
i understand the "bend" concept, but.......the business we run, it's not like a mcdonalds, where we have 1,000's of people walking in and out every day, spending thier money, or like a store, where they have a huge product line, and thier facility is accesible (workable) every day, all year round, rain or shine. it's a completely different scene. we have a tiny product line, diminished further by the fact that each product is limited to seasonal availabilty, and diminished even further based on adverse weather conditions. taking all this into consideration, i think THE CLIENT should be the one to "bend". you do a 3,000 sq ft lawn renovation. our price to thatch/seed/aerate/fert this property is $315. $50 of that is the cost of the seed . now, to buy another sack, and reseed, would cost another $50, not to mention time/fuel, etc. WTF???? i didn't do it? it was the rain, why should i have to cover it? why would the client expect me to? it's like, if i buy a goldfish, i know damn well it has a better chance of dying, than living. i accept this risk when i lay down my $3 bucks and take it home

TURFLORD
10-11-2005, 11:24 AM
what's the deal on this: seeded a not so steep slope, but with all the rain comming hard and heavy, immediately after we finished, some of the seed washed down. client is demanding a re-seed. do you?
A quick question. Did you slice the area before seeding? If not you didn't do the job properly, and should redo the seeding. Sorry.:rolleyes:

bobbygedd
10-11-2005, 12:29 PM
no, i thatched, aerated, seeded. this IS PROPER procedure. remember, it's not a steep slope, if i understood "degrees" i'd give that to you, but i don't.

hoskm01
10-12-2005, 06:54 AM
No matter how logical it is to you, me, or any other member of LS, the customer wants you to do it and probably won't be happy until you do. Though it may cost more money for him to hire the next guy, pay him to re-seed the area and establish a working relationship and trust with him on his property, it will make him feel better because you are not doing it, which to him is justice, because he didnt get what he wanted from you in the first place. You shouldnt have to worry about losing him as a customer, but you do, and you are. Is it worth the risk? Only you can answer that based on the value of the customer and the cost to fix the damage.

olderthandirt
10-12-2005, 07:23 AM
labor for free seed at full retail price. Evens out that I don't make or loose for the redo. But I made enough the 1st time to cover it.

treedoc1
10-12-2005, 08:23 AM
I don't sell 'x' amount of seed when a renovation is done. I sell that the lawn will benefit from the aeration and germination will occur where the cores were pulled. Anything more, the sale and the customers expectations weren't correct.

Over seeding into aeration holes is like shooting a shotgun into a dixie cup...lucky if 5% of the seed finds a hole and soil to germinate. Don't believe it?...calculate the amount of cores pulled from the surface area even after 3 passes.
I would wait and see the germination results. That is all the customer cares about.

Aerating and overseeding wastes an enormous amount of seed, but that is not what you should be selling to the customer if they want new grass. Aerating and overseeding overtime will improve the soil profile/thatch layer/compaction. The little bit of grass improvement is like sprinkles on ann ice cream cone.

Slit seeding is for grass stand improvement. Bare area seeding is for grass stand initiation. Overseeding with no soil contact is only good for Scott's, Pennington, and Lofts.

My 2 cents.

bobbygedd
10-12-2005, 09:08 AM
ah, but you see, you're not TRYING to shoot the seed into the holes. those cores, the little clumps of dirt that come out.....they break down and provide a tiny amount of soil, to cover the seed around them.i've got the same results from aerating/seeding, as i have from slice seeding, provided the thatch was removed first, and the area is not completely bare. not to mention the other benefits of aeration

TURFLORD
10-12-2005, 06:29 PM
People think aeration is poking 1" holes in the soil. True "aeration" is a metal tine penetrating4-6" into the soil and arcing to relieve compaction And remove plugs to turn the soil. Unfortunately irrigation systems would get in the way if this was the norm. Like any other crop seed must be cultivated. You don't see farmers poking holes and throwing down corn kernel. First furrow the soil or slice, apply seed, then close the furrow to bury the seed no more that 1/2" so the seed doesn't get eroded. This will give you an excellent germination rate and the customer will be soo pleased when they see rows of new lawn 2" apart.

muddstopper
10-12-2005, 08:27 PM
Bobby, with the seed rates you claim to use, you probably have nothing to worry about. If half your seed washed off you still have more than enough to give good results. $50 worth of seed on 3000sqft?? and a supposed 95% germination rate,( your statements not mine), Dont worry about the job, just give it a few days and see what comes up.

PMLAWN
10-12-2005, 11:22 PM
ah, but you see, you're not TRYING to shoot the seed into the holes. those cores, the little clumps of dirt that come out.....they break down and provide a tiny amount of soil, to cover the seed around them.i've got the same results from aerating/seeding, as i have from slice seeding, provided the thatch was removed first, and the area is not completely bare. not to mention the other benefits of aeration

Very good point. Seed that goes down a 3 inch whole is to deep anyway.
Plug enough and you will have a lot of dirt on the surface,