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bdurham
10-14-2005, 04:10 PM
I have a customer that wants me to remove two 8-9 year old sago palms. These things are huge. I may have a potential buyer so I would like to remove them without killing them.
Any ideas on how to transplant these bushes? Root structure? Possible depth?
Trunks are probably 10-12" in diameter and are at least 4' to the top of the "flower" in the middle. Branches extend to probably 6-8' in diameter.

Thanks

Brian

Kate Butler
10-14-2005, 07:57 PM
Bring Gloves!!

Az Gardener
10-14-2005, 11:27 PM
Although they are not technically a palm they have the same type of roots. I would start by tying a rope around the base loosely then get 2-3 people and pull it up to fold the frawns up. This will eliminate the poking issues. I would try for a 32" box root ball. you may be able to get by with a 24" or smaller but the bigger the root ball the less the shock and transition period. The bigger issue is a favorable location. Here the architects put them in full sun or late afternoon shade and tells the homeowners they will acclimate yea maybe in 5-6 years of looking like he!! But they are hard to kill in a good location but the digging is no fun.

PurpHaze
10-15-2005, 10:31 PM
I have a customer that wants me to remove two 8-9 year old sago palms. These things are huge. I may have a potential buyer so I would like to remove them without killing them.
Any ideas on how to transplant these bushes? Root structure? Possible depth?
Trunks are probably 10-12" in diameter and are at least 4' to the top of the "flower" in the middle. Branches extend to probably 6-8' in diameter.

Thanks

Brian

Heavy man! You will not believe how heavy the trunk and root ball are. Get plenty of :help:

In our area large sago palms (cycads actually) are so valuable that thieves have been known to dig them up and steal them including from city hall right next to the police department. Some people have resorted to securing them with large chains locked to long hurricane screws that are drilled 3-5 ft. into the ground.

Go here http://www.rhapisgardens.com/sagos/ as they have a lot of info (including transplanting) on sagos.

bdurham
10-18-2005, 12:29 PM
Thanks for the info. We managed to dig one up yesterday evening, unfortunately it was the smaller of the two. T'weren't no picnic thats for sure, especially since they had planted these in a smallish garden area and covered the surrounding area with rocks instead of mulch. Not looking forward to Weds when we tackle the biggun.

Now the question is....what do I do with them? Was thinking of containerizing them through winter and try to resell them in the spring as long as they survive all this. I have lots of "pups" as well. Probably would have been a heck of lot easier just to pull them out of the garden without trying to salvage them, but couldn't bring myself to do it.

Az Gardener
10-18-2005, 04:14 PM
I was told in a hort class some years ago that the way they propagate them here is they ship the live trunk from South America (where they are abundant) cut them into coaster sized slices then cut the coasters into pizza slices and the tree will grow from that small a piece. Leads me to believe in the right location/conditions they would be easy to grow.

Garth
10-18-2005, 06:00 PM
Actually I did my dissertation on Cycas and related cycads and asexual propagation using the "pups" or offsets requires removal from the parent plant, followed by striping off the leaves and roots. Then the offset is put in a warm shaded area to "harden off", or dry for about a week. Placing it in good lightly moist soil will start the offset to prduce the roots and leaves in about a month, sometimes a little longer. Wait until the soil is mostly dry before watering it again. After the production of the second set of leaves, apply a MILD ferilizer with micronutrients (iron, manganese, sulfur and calcium as well as N, P, K) and you should have a nice little plant. Incidentally, the oldest potted plant in the world is a cycad in the Royal Botanical Society in Birmingham, England. It was brought to England in 1775 from South Africa. Cycas revoluta (Sago palm) in indigenous to Japan though closely related species are found all over the world.

Garth
10-18-2005, 06:00 PM
Somehow I got a double posting on this thread.

PurpHaze
10-18-2005, 11:54 PM
Actually I did my dissertation on Cycas and related cycads and asexual propagation using the "pups" or offsets requires removal from the parent plant, followed by striping off the leaves and roots. Then the offset is put in a warm shaded area to "harden off", or dry for about a week. Placing it in good lightly moist soil will start the offset to prduce the roots and leaves in about a month, sometimes a little longer. Wait until the soil is mostly dry before watering it again. After the production of the second set of leaves, apply a MILD ferilizer with micronutrients (iron, manganese, sulfur and calcium as well as N, P, K) and you should have a nice little plant. Incidentally, the oldest potted plant in the world is a cycad in the Royal Botanical Society in Birmingham, England. It was brought to England in 1775 from South Africa. Cycas revoluta (Sago palm) in indigenous to Japan though closely related species are found all over the world.

Thanks wholeheartedly for the info. My wife loves to take the pups and start new plants for her friends. But she's only been getting about 30% of them to take hold. She appreciates the info and will put it to good use.

PurpHaze
10-18-2005, 11:56 PM
Now the question is....what do I do with them? Was thinking of containerizing them through winter and try to resell them in the spring as long as they survive all this. I have lots of "pups" as well. Probably would have been a heck of lot easier just to pull them out of the garden without trying to salvage them, but couldn't bring myself to do it.

I don't think you'd have too much problem putting them into containers if they're large enough. You might have to box it if it's a big one.