PDA

View Full Version : Thuja Green Giants?


nbrockb
10-19-2005, 11:02 AM
I am planting about 90 Thuja Green Giants as a border around a subdivision and need help. How do I price the job? I need to give several estimates with different size trees. (ex. 1'-2' trees, 4'-'5 treses etc.) Should I charge per tree? The ground is fairly rough has trenches and ruts throughout, in other words, it's not just flat ground. Do I need to bring in topsoil? I was also thinking about planting the tree in new topsoil along with pete moss. Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Brock

LB1234
10-19-2005, 05:52 PM
Please don't take offense to this...but...

Perhaps this job is a little out of your league at this point in time...you are asking whether or not topsoil is needed...

how much experience do you have with this type of work?

Dreams To Designs
10-20-2005, 12:02 PM
Brock, Need more information. Where are you doing this install? have they given you a budget? Is there irrigation?

Kirk

sheshovel
10-20-2005, 12:55 PM
YES!Bring in topsoil and add organic matter ..compost.Level out the areas for the trees so they will be able to hole their water intell established.Go to a nursery and get some prices and ask for contractors price and what delivery will cost you and yes charge double for the trees then your labor seperate.The labor depends upon how big of trees and what you are gonna have to do to get them in the ground.

nbrockb
10-20-2005, 06:15 PM
Well actually I'm fairly new at planting trees. Experienced in mowing but not the planting. I am mixing pete moss and slow release fert. with the trees but didn't know if I should mix fresh topsoil in with each hole verses what soil (chirt) was already there. The soil that I'm digging in is mainly chirt. Thanks for the replies. They were helpful.
Brock

Dreams To Designs
10-21-2005, 05:00 PM
Excuse my ignorance, but what is "chirt"?

Peat moss is not usually a good soil conditioner unless you are looking to make the soil more acidic and hold more water. You would be much better off with a compost of some kind. Leaf mold or compost would be cheapest and easiest to use. Bring all kinds of good things with it that improve the soil. Peat moss has no nutritional value. Depending on where you are, fertilizer should be very low dosage. You don't want to push a lot of new growth that will be susceptible to winter kill.

Use topsoil and compost to grade and improve the soil, as Sheshovel suggested, then planting will be easier and more successful. You are much better off improving the soil, rather than improving the planting hole. If the soil you create in the planting hole is much better than what's around it, the plants will resist growing beyond the container you have created.

To price the job, cost of materials (including warranty replacement if applicable), labor, overhead and profit. Plant price times 3 is a guide, not a rule. If you are going to guarantee the plants, usually the plants x 2 covers the plants and replacement if needed. Then add in any other materials, labor, overhead and a profit percentage.

Kirk

PurpHaze
10-21-2005, 10:54 PM
Excuse my ignorance, but what is "chirt"?

According to my "soils" textbook it's basically silica. ;)

sheshovel
10-22-2005, 01:15 AM
Dreams is correct,Peat moss will actially draw moisture away from the roots and absorb and hold it.It is no longer recommended as a planting amendment.Also those trees could actually be damaged if you use a slow release fertilizer because they don't need it and you don't have the expierience to use it properly.