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South Florida Lawns
10-22-2005, 10:40 PM
I have a church that needs more parking lot space. They want me to get rid of a lot of gardens to make more space. Most of the plants are viburnum and Indian Hawthorn (in pretty rough shape), I was thinking of having 2 guys with brush cutters cut off the top of the plant, then hit the area a couple times with some roundup pro. Then come back later and sod/seed. Do you think this would work out?

lawnman_scott
10-23-2005, 08:19 AM
if you have a riding mower, get a chain and 2 good locks. Lock the chain to the mower, wrap the other end around the plant tight a few times and they will come right out. Its the cleanest way to get everything.

South Florida Lawns
10-23-2005, 09:04 PM
You wanna sit there and pull 300 shrubs out with your lawnmower? Well come on down cuz I don't. That would take too much time.

all ferris
10-23-2005, 09:50 PM
I think you should spray first then come back a couple days later and cut the tops off. The RU would work much better:p

General Landscaping
10-24-2005, 12:49 AM
Rent a skid steer and a Mexican.

Pluck 'em out while Pedro works the chain and tosses the plants in the bucket.

Use the skid steer to do your groud prep too.

topsites
10-24-2005, 01:18 AM
You wanna sit there and pull 300 shrubs out with your lawnmower? Well come on down cuz I don't. That would take too much time.

LOL, is it stuff like this?
http://www-laep.ced.berkeley.edu/laep/courses/images/271_1.jpg

Cauz THAT's gonna leave some HOLES later, if you kill them the roots will eventually die and decompose, then the soil sinks in those spots...
Maybe I'm wrong, it COULD be the root system of this bush is superficial but it looks kinda like an azalea or boxwood, and THOSE roots are anything BUT superficial (try TOUGH and embedded, heh)...

...
NEVER use a machine to pull out a plant, it looks really bad and unprofessional at least in this context (unless it's an excavator or a backhoe is what I mean). In an emergency I MIGHT do it, still I'd rather not because one day you'll be surprised by a nasty root system that won't come out (those Indian Haws don't look like no joke), or maybe an underground cable got snagged in over the years by said root system and you can guess what happens next.

Your idea of round-up is good but I would spray FIRST, THEN a month later cut them down, then in spring pull them all up (check on them around February when you got nothing better to do) as they'll be nice and dead by then you should be able to pull them out easily by hand.

I say go with the round-up but spray FIRST because covering most the live leaves is what is important with this non-selective plant killer, then wait 2-4 weeks and you MIGHT have to spray again keeping in mind Round-up MUST be sprayed while the plant is GROWING so maybe spray it extra-heavy now rather than taking the chance its growth is stunted come late November. Once the top is dead, likely so are the roots - Keep in mind once you pull it out you'll need some topsoil, hate to do it this way but how much topsoil you will need depends thou in this case you'll need around half a barrow's worth per hole, so 20 plants = 1 cu.yd. soil (roughly) DANG dude that's 15 cu.yds of soil at $15/yard = $175 plus the labor IF a half a barrow covers it (sometimes a nasty azalea takes a whole 4-6 cu.ft. of dirt, that's an entire barrow and 10 barrows = 1 cu.yd. of soil)... you MIGHT be as well off renting an excavator or a loader, I dunno but definitely think of the holes the plants will leave once dug up, 'k.

p.s.: If you end up renting an exxie or a loader (ask for minis such as the Dingo or R-series), keep in mind before you dig call Miss Utility, it's the law. You can rent them from the same rent-4-centers rent you other stuff like aerators, etc, cost on them ranges around 150-200/day and you need to find out the WEIGHT of the machine as it is possible you'll need THEM to deliver / pick it up which costs another 75-100...

zturncutter
10-24-2005, 08:37 PM
I have a church that needs more parking lot space. They want me to get rid of a lot of gardens to make more space. Most of the plants are viburnum and Indian Hawthorn (in pretty rough shape), I was thinking of having 2 guys with brush cutters cut off the top of the plant, then hit the area a couple times with some roundup pro. Then come back later and sod/seed. Do you think this would work out?


This will work just fine, we have been doing this for years even on large landscape projects.

South Florida Lawns
10-26-2005, 09:33 PM
I have 4 Mexicans that work for me already, they are a big help. I thought about a skid steer but I don't want to tear other stuff up in the process, I want to be in and out in a day. Topsites, you know your stuff but I don't have all that time as you suggested, it has to be out and covered with sod by the beginning of November. Basically the church has overgrown its prop. so we have to create more parking by eliminating a few beds.

In the end its 1. either chopping dropping sod and be done with it, or 2. get a tracked Dingo and start ripping at those suckers, but I'd rather stick with the first.

Lawnworks
10-26-2005, 10:12 PM
I just don't understand how you are going to chop and drop? It would not be prepped for sod? I would rent a bobcat w/ tracks and a harley rake and maybe a root grapple. I don't think I would fool w/ a dingo for such a large job even though I think they are extremely versitile. I think you can definately be in and out in a day. Fire up those amigos!

As far as round-up goes... it sounds like it would take forever. Round-up is pretty weak anyway.

Oh and I have never had any luck w/ brush cutters. A chainsaw and a couple of extra chains will be alot faster IMO.

jimmdenver
10-26-2005, 11:58 PM
There's two kinds of landscapers. Theres the kind that knows when to bring in a Bobcat and charge accordingly, and those who don't.

Now I have every faith in you, South FL. Please tell me you're the first kind.

Richard Martin
10-27-2005, 07:13 AM
Make sure you are allowed to do this work first. In my area this type of work requires a permit and it is expensive if you don't get one. Back in the old days they used to just fine the property owner, now they fine the contractor too.

sheshovel
10-27-2005, 03:56 PM
This question answers itself...
does it not SouthFlorida?
Why seed for a parking area?Why not gravel it?

Richard Martin
10-27-2005, 04:45 PM
This question answers itself...
does it not SouthFlorida?
Why seed for a parking area?Why not gravel it?

It most likely won't be a real parking area. More like an overflow I imagine.

South Florida Lawns
10-27-2005, 07:24 PM
The areas soon to be grass are already good to go. I ended up chopping off the tops then hit the whole area with a bobcat MT52 mini loader with a stump grinder. That took care of the roots then I had the crew level and rake the soil. I compacted it as much as possible with the weight of the machine. Tomorrow we will lay the sod.

Lawnworks
10-27-2005, 09:06 PM
GIT-R-DONE!!

What are the general soil conditions in FL?

General Landscaping
10-27-2005, 09:58 PM
sand or muck
not much in between

PurpHaze
10-27-2005, 10:55 PM
sand or muck
not much in between

sand... hurricane... muck... hurricane... sand... hurricane... muck... hurricane

:cool2: (native conch born in Key West)

South Florida Lawns
11-03-2005, 05:27 PM
The soil sure drains fast and its main composition is sand with maybe a little topsoil. I just laid the sod last week, and St. Augustine needs very little soil preparation. Earlier this week we got a good rainstorm and the new turf seems to be taking on well.

miacharger
11-04-2005, 09:42 AM
Funny, I once ripped out a cherry hedge and some bamboo for the Salvation Army and that was done using a Mustang loader with a grapple type bucket. The whole process took 6 hours and pulled up the conduit for the parking lot lights in the process. Someone thought that burying it 6 inches was enough, and no one knew it was there! Personally it was better than trying to cut off the plants and sod because once it was done wiith a group of Ixoras and in 6 months there were depressions everywhere, the mowers sank in and bent blades hitting coral rock. My advice, go with the loader and a grapple or toothed bucket. Takes less time than cutting too! Besides I wouldn't want to sod over unprepared ground with herbicide in it.