PDA

View Full Version : Neighbor of client is causing problems!


Critical Care
10-27-2005, 10:38 PM
Iím ticked off but donít know what to do. The neighbor of one of my clients has the gall to rake debris off of his property and onto my clients for me to pick up and haul off. This guy has been doing this for years, and though I felt this was happening, it was less obvious than what I saw today.

Today there was a row of pine needles and leaves stretching from the front to the back of the side of my clientís property. This same idiot also directly drains three of his rain gutters off onto my clientís property, which I believe is illegal. That was the first clue that this joker was a real winner.

I know my client doesnít want to start a range war, but at the same time I canít be picking up after some lowlife banana yielding knuckle walker. So what to do?

QualityLawnCare4u
10-27-2005, 11:22 PM
There is another thread almost identical to your problem "neighbor and his leaves" you might want to read for some interesting ideas.

lpwhandyman
10-27-2005, 11:33 PM
Open up the chute and blow it back on his property. Or is this one of those cases where your client has trees along his property line and the material from his trees are going over to the neighbors yard, so he gets mad and rakes them back to the property line?

PurpHaze
10-27-2005, 11:47 PM
Take a gas can, open it, walk down the pine needle line pouring gas, get to the end, light a match and then RUN like hell! :dizzy:

Critical Care
10-28-2005, 11:08 AM
I'm sure that this post is a bit like some others in the past, and I will look at those. I suppose that voicing my frustration with this idiot helps keep me in check, and to avoid having to resort to torching tactics.

Open up the chute and blow it back on his property. Or is this one of those cases where your client has trees along his property line and the material from his trees are going over to the neighbors yard, so he gets mad and rakes them back to the property line?

This is an area where there are a lot of trees, on both properties. Who is to say where all of this stuff blew in from, but it is safe to assume that this guy figures that it all belongs to my client. He doesn't rake this stuff back to the property line, but over it, and along with quite a bit of his bark.

rick2752
10-28-2005, 05:24 PM
Send him a bill with a dump fee. Hell, he might pay it. lol. He is doing most of the work, load it up and place a bill in his door and thank him for the business.:p

Runner
10-28-2005, 08:00 PM
It doesn't matter who's trees it fa;;s off of. If it's in his yard, then it's his. I would simply be tempted to just fire up the mower or the Little Wonder and let it fly back into his yard. You'll have to speak to your customer and tell him that you will have to charge accordingly. He will then have to take it up with his neighbor if he doesn't want to take the lump for it. This certainly shouldn't have to come out of your pocket, though. Another thing you could do is just tell your customer that you will be moving that material BACK over to his neighbors property.

dvmcmrhp52
10-28-2005, 08:03 PM
It doesn't matter who's trees it fa;;s off of. If it's in his yard, then it's his. I would simply be tempted to just fire up the mower or the Little Wonder and let it fly back into his yard. You'll have to speak to your customer and tell him that you will have to charge accordingly. He will then have to take it up with his neighbor if he doesn't want to take the lump for it. This certainly shouldn't have to come out of your pocket, though. Another thing you could do is just tell your customer that you will be moving that material BACK over to his neighbors property.



Yup, it would be blowing out the chute of the mower in the direction from which it came..............he'd get the message soon enough.

RedWolf
10-28-2005, 08:18 PM
Thats what I do.I had a guy do the samething so I just blew it back in his yard and when he said something I said ill clean it up for 50 bucks.He shut his mouth real fast and when he talked to my customer who I ride with to bike week ever year turned around and said"If you cause my lawn man any ****, I WILL stick my foot so far up your a** you wont walk right for a month".Now keep in mind that he is from the same part of NewYork im from.Up there noone takes **** from anyone.

yrdandgardenhandyman
10-28-2005, 08:30 PM
Yup, it would be blowing out the chute of the mower in the direction from which it came..............he'd get the message soon enough.


Why does everyone want to get into the clients neighbor problems? You aren't his property line enforcer. You are the landscaper. Charge your customer accordingly and let him take it up with the neighbor. It's only your problem if you make it your problem. And if your client doesn't want to deal with the client, either take the extra money or drop him.

UNISCAPER
10-28-2005, 09:09 PM
Simple answer. If it is on your clients property, bill your client as a line item for the neighbors stuff. At that time if your client asks you what gives, tell him just like you did ion this thread, but be diplomatic about it. Someone needs to pay. It's not a hard thing to figure out. weather it is your cleint or the neighbor, who cares, just so you are covered.

grasswhacker
10-28-2005, 09:38 PM
Yup, it would be blowing out the chute of the mower in the direction from which it came..............he'd get the message soon enough.

Yes and use Meg-mo blades to make it much harder to rake them back into your clients yard. :D

Critical Care
10-29-2005, 11:41 AM
There isn't any turf area between these properties, but if there was, I'd be willing to bet that this guy would dump his grass clippings over the property line as well.

I don't want to lose my client; he's been with me since day one. And right now I'd rather not have to charge him extra for having a dumbarshe neighbor. I think right now I'll just push the debris back over the property line and talk to my client about it.

I'd also like to stuff a few tennis balls up this guys... Now wait a minute, you have no idea what I'm going to say!

I won't, but I'd like to stuff tennis balls up the flex pipe coming off of this guys downspouts. He has three flex pipes buried under his bark, but all three open up right onto my client's property. Of course you can imagine what happens when we get a good rain. What a pain, eh?

PurpHaze
10-29-2005, 12:25 PM
I think you've hit on the right approach. Talk to your client and see what he says.

yrdandgardenhandyman
10-29-2005, 01:51 PM
There isn't any turf area between these properties, but if there was, I'd be willing to bet that this guy would dump his grass clippings over the property line as well.

I don't want to lose my client; he's been with me since day one. And right now I'd rather not have to charge him extra for having a dumbarshe neighbor. I think right now I'll just push the debris back over the property line and talk to my client about it.

I'd also like to stuff a few tennis balls up this guys... Now wait a minute, you have no idea what I'm going to say!

I won't, but I'd like to stuff tennis balls up the flex pipe coming off of this guys downspouts. He has three flex pipes buried under his bark, but all three open up right onto my client's property. Of course you can imagine what happens when we get a good rain. What a pain, eh?



If a neighbor does that here, he can be charged with vandalism. If you blow it back on his property, you can be charged with vandalism.:dizzy:
Your best bet is to let the homeowner deal with it. Even if he has been with you from day one, he has no right to expect you to deal with the chit. If he won't take care of the problem either by calling the law, talking to the neighbor or paying you for the extra work, DUMP HIS SORRY AZZ and move on. If you bill the neighbor, you probably won't recover the money as you have no contract with him.

sheshovel
10-29-2005, 05:32 PM
I can imagine that your client does not know that water is being directed onto their property by the neighbor,this is not allowed in most places.You have to handle the water leaving your property and you cannot direct it onto others properties.Inform your client of this cuz it's not right.

Critical Care
10-29-2005, 08:51 PM
Actually Sheshovel, my client does know about the water being directed onto his property, but doesn't know about the leaves and needles.

And YGHM, how could I be charged with vandalism if I just return to this guy what he accidently misplaced?

yrdandgardenhandyman
10-29-2005, 09:14 PM
Actually Sheshovel, my client does know about the water being directed onto his property, but doesn't know about the leaves and needles.

And YGHM, how could I be charged with vandalism if I just return to this guy what he accidently misplaced?


I don't profess to know what the law is where you are from but here it is the same as someone slashes your tires, you can't slash theirs in retaliation. Let the law take it's course. Don't take the law into your own hands and let the homeowner deal with it. That's all I'm saying.

ezlc2004
11-04-2005, 09:18 AM
I would take my digital camera and take pictures of the property when I was finished. The if you can go by the property and get pictures after the knuckle head rakes everthing over, take another picture. Presesnt the evidence to your customer. Explain to your customer that they are paying for his cleanup. When it comes to their wallet they will be motivated to resolve the issue. Then ask your customer to resolve it with the neighbor. Don't get between the two! Don't get between them!!!!!!! Don't blow stuff back into his yard either. I know it's hard to be the better person, but be proffesional and press on. You might want to check local laws on clipping and debris. I know it's illegal here to blow anything into the street. Maybe you'll get lucky and theres something on the books for yards. Also one more thought. Ask your neighbor if they know when he does his yardwork. See if they can get a picture of him raking into there yard. A picture is damming evidence. I had this problem with a neighbor throwing beer bottle caps into my yard for two years. And he was a cop.

orionkf
11-16-2005, 02:49 AM
Iím ticked off but donít know what to do. The neighbor of one of my clients has the gall to rake debris off of his property and onto my clients for me to pick up and haul off. This guy has been doing this for years, and though I felt this was happening, it was less obvious than what I saw today.

Today there was a row of pine needles and leaves stretching from the front to the back of the side of my clientís property. This same idiot also directly drains three of his rain gutters off onto my clientís property, which I believe is illegal. That was the first clue that this joker was a real winner.

I know my client doesnít want to start a range war, but at the same time I canít be picking up after some lowlife banana yielding knuckle walker. So what to do?


Here's a possible way to look at it:
If he's been doing it for years, then you have either been losing money all that time, or you have been figuring it into the price, right? If the first, charge more, if the latter, don't sweat it.

Critical Care
11-16-2005, 06:41 PM
Here's a possible way to look at it:
If he's been doing it for years, then you have either been losing money all that time, or you have been figuring it into the price, right? If the first, charge more, if the latter, don't sweat it.

I think that the scenerio has been that at first he didn't do it, or would just kick a few pine cones over, but in time he just got bolder and would do more. So no, I hadn't accounted for the extra mess.

PurpHaze
11-17-2005, 12:04 AM
I think that the scenerio has been that at first he didn't do it, or would just kick a few pine cones over, but in time he just got bolder and would do more. So no, I hadn't accounted for the extra mess.

I just hate sneaky F-ing neighbors. :p

tiedeman
11-17-2005, 06:20 AM
I would say something to your customer about it. Tell the customer that unfortunately you might have to start charging him/her more because of the neighbor. Or also look at it this way; perhaps the customer invited the neighbor to do it.

Critical Care
11-17-2005, 02:14 PM
...perhaps the customer invited the neighbor to do it.

That is always a possibility, but since the amount of stuff being pushed over the property line has increased over time, it makes me think that it has been more of a covert operation. And, of course, remember that this "neighbor" does his neighborly thing by diverting the water from off his roof directly onto my clients landscape. If your neighbors did that to you would you tell them its okay for them to push their debris onto your property? I doubt it.

Critical Care
11-17-2005, 02:20 PM
Umm... just to let inquiring minds know what has happened from all of this...

Mostly nothing has happened. There still is a row of debris along the border. In time it will go away, but for now its making a statement to this neighbor that people know about his tricks. And, who knows, perhaps it will also keep his diverted roof water from washing away my clients bark as quickly. Gotta look for that silver lining, eh?

tiedeman
11-17-2005, 03:04 PM
hope everything will work out with this

T-Trim
11-19-2005, 03:35 AM
KISS
Keep it simple stupid
Is one easy way of doing it. I would have look at the pile and said to myself "That pile is not my problem". And just clean up what was outline in writing. If there is a problem then you can say "OOhh that pile". And turn back with saying " But that wasn't outline here in the work order about a pile running front to back on the property line."

upidstay
11-19-2005, 07:17 AM
I've had this happen to me a few times. We hauled the leaves away and sent the neighbor a bill, and another time we neatly raked the leaves back over onto his side of the property. Another time the leaves/debris were left there for several weeks (they were a leaf customer opnly and we weren't aware of them being there) and killed the grass underneath. We hauled the leaves away, renovated the damaged area, and billed the neighbor. He screamed and one letter from our lawyer shut his mouth and opened his checkbook.

Critical Care
11-19-2005, 02:31 PM
Upidstay, what's to keep these people from just denying that they dumped debris onto your client's property? Before you would ever collect anything from them it would seem that you would need irrefutable proof that they did it.

UNISCAPER
11-19-2005, 05:38 PM
Ok. herezz what you do. Crap in a bag, then go tto the porch of the person dumping the stuff on your clients lawn. Light the bag on fire then ring their doorbell and run. That will fixem! :):):)

yrdandgardenhandyman
11-19-2005, 06:30 PM
Ok. herezz what you do. Crap in a bag, then go tto the porch of the person dumping the stuff on your clients lawn. Light the bag on fire then ring their doorbell and run. That will fixem! :):):)


We actually, recently, had an incident here in this town when some kids did that on a wooden front porch. I believe it was doggy doo though. :rolleyes: Sadly, there was nobody home and the house burnt down.

P & L Turf
11-22-2005, 09:03 PM
If you've been putting up with this for a couple of years or so, then it's time to give it back to him. What I do is drop the chute off the trac-vac and let it all blow back into his yard. And if possible add a little to it. Or even better when he floods your yard with his downspouts, drive around the water through his yard and maybe give him a little tire slide to show that you're not to happy with it and that you've taken notice. This way he'll only be mad at you and not the customer.

garth1967
11-26-2005, 05:25 AM
mmm yes see your client advise them to see the nieghbour or you will have to charge for the extra time if they arent happy with that then tell the client you will deal with them. tell nieghbour you are happy to remove the debris for a small fee if he isnt happy with that advise him that you will be returning the debris free of charge

topsites
11-26-2005, 09:34 AM
Why does everyone want to get into the clients neighbor problems? You aren't his property line enforcer. You are the landscaper. Charge your customer accordingly and let him take it up with the neighbor. It's only your problem if you make it your problem. And if your client doesn't want to deal with the client, either take the extra money or drop him.

As for me, I've had my fill with this problem over the years and think the above is the best answer I have heard thus far.
Thanks for the help, that's what I'll be doing from now on.