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allprogreens
10-28-2005, 09:16 AM
When selling a synthetic golf green to a customer, sell in 5 ft. long increments. This will generate you an additional $122.50 to $588.00 profit per job. This can be used to cover insidential costs or go straight to your bottom line profit.

Here is an example of how it works:
A customer has a 12' x 32 area he wants to put in a green. You will sell the customer a 12' x 35' green. At $12 a sq. ft. installed price, that is an additional 37 sq. ft. or $444.00 profit you have made on the job.

This doesn't include the money you can make on landscaping around the green. The photo below shows a $10,000 green around a $50,000 in landscape job that includes plants, trees, block work and rock work around the green.

Ed Bailey of Ultimate Putting Greens in Atlanta, Georgia just installed a $35,000 putting green around a $100,000 landscape job around the green that another contractor installed. The landscape included plants, trees, walkway, a retaining that wraped around half the green and a water feature.

This one strategy can be applied to most products you sell to generate more profits.
How you ask? If you sell water features, sell the pond & liner in 5 ft increments, If you sell brick paver patios, sell in 5 ft increments, If you sell sod, sell in 5 ft. increments. If you sell retaining walls, sell in 5 ft increments. Do the Math. How much more revenue and profit can this strategy make your company per job, per month, and per year.

Learn every week new tips, strategies, and tactics used by successful contractors how they turned an add-on service into a new division of thier business at our "Insider Secrets" forum: http://www.lawnsite.com/forumdisplay.php?f=138

Check out the "Contractor Section" of our website:
http://www.allprogreens.com/magazine/spring05-home.html


Chris
All Pro Greens
800-334-9005
www.allprogreens.com

http://www.allprogreens.com/gallery/landscape/big051.jpg

grassyfras
10-28-2005, 04:41 PM
What do you put under the golf gree? Is it just minus. I heard of a guy here that is using a sod cutter and minus to install these things. I would think thers more to it.

allprogreens
10-28-2005, 11:30 PM
What do you put under the golf gree? Is it just minus. I heard of a guy here that is using a sod cutter and minus to install these things. I would think thers more to it.

You are correct. First you have to remove the sod w/ a sod cutter. Next you compact the ground. Next lay a geotextile fabric on the ground. This is used to stablize the base material. Next layout the crushed stone base - 1/4 inch minus up to 3/8 inch minus. This must be compacted 4 iches thick amd achieve a 95% compaction. Next, hand tamp the base to get rip of any ridges and imperfections caused from the plate compactor. this ensures a smooth base.

iT'S THAT EASY!

The biggest mistake made by contractors is not taking the time to get the base smooth. The turf fits like a glove to the base so large ridges from the plate compactor will show up on the turf if not removed

You can view the entire install in streaming video on our website: http://www.allprogreens.com/toolsandinstall-greeninstall.htm

Check our our "Contractor Section" of our website to learn about the business: http://www.allprogreens.com/magazine/spring05-home.html

Thanks for your interest.

Chris
All Pro Greens
www.allprogreens.com
800-334-9005

http://www.allprogreens.com/gallery/border/big012.jpg

grassyfras
10-29-2005, 11:50 AM
Doesnt it shift. I would just think you would have to put them in deeper.

kris
10-29-2005, 01:28 PM
Chris ...in the picture shown in your signature it looks to me like there is a lip of concrete a few inches deep all the way around the green... how is the water draining?

allprogreens
10-29-2005, 03:38 PM
Doesnt it shift. I would just think you would have to put them in deeper.

If you live in an area where you have freeze/thaw or heaving then you will want the base to be 6 to 8 inches compacted instead of 4 inches. We have hundreds of greens in Michigan that have alot of freeze/thaw. We have not had any problems with a base of 6 to 8 inches.

The draining of the turf is off the top of the green and not through it. So very little moisture gets through to the base to cause heaving.

We are about to finish field-testing a hardener that is added to the base. The hardener can be purchased locally in your area, it will set-up within 1 hour, and will ensure the base will never move. This is another way for us to improve the install process and ensure contractors don't have call-backs.

Thanks for your interest

Chris
All Pro Greens
800-334-9005
www.allprogreens.com

http://www.allprogreens.com/gallery/border/big001.jpg

allprogreens
10-29-2005, 03:55 PM
Chris ...in the picture shown in your signature it looks to me like there is a lip of concrete a few inches deep all the way around the green... how is the water draining?


Hey Kris

This is a good observation!

If you look closely at the concrete border, you will see where the curbing has been cut in several places w/ a saw specifically for drainage. Also, there is slope to the base for drainage. You need to average a 1% slope or 1 inch drop every 10 to 12 feet the length or width of the base. You can still add undulations and coutours where you may have a 1 inch rise and fall back to grade over 3 to 5 feet. You can even do a 2 tier base where you drop 6 inches or more over 3 to 5 feet like in the photo below. But overall 1 inch drop every 10 to 12 feet.

Learn more about the business: http://www.allprogreens.com/magazine/spring05-home.html

Chris
All Pro Greens
www.allprogreens.com
800-334-9005

http://www.allprogreens.com/gallery/border/big060.jpg