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sheshovel
12-04-2005, 04:51 AM
What do you guys think..Decomposing granite hill mixed with solid granite hill.Back of home
As you can see drainage
problem and ...well you can see the homeowner drain there.Apparently used to drain into a broken off pipe around the corner then into pipe and out to street drain.
Would a wall help here?Or hinder?
Also that small corner is the only access besides from the top of the hill..no room for equipment to get back there.
Just thought I would see what you might come up with

cgland
12-04-2005, 11:53 AM
I would replace solid pipe w/ corrugated pipe, wrap, and install some decorative stone. Nothing fancy, just practical in this situation.

Chris

sheshovel
12-04-2005, 05:47 PM
I know what to do to fix the drainage..I want to know opinions on a wall here would help at all because the drain continualy fills with sand and soil from the top of the hill.But now that I think about it..you would have to drain the wall as well,so no would be my answer.Best I can do is fix the drain below and mulch the top of the hill and dig a rock filled diversion drain along the top to the lowest corner.So I will not suggest a retaining wall here.
The drain there actually has holes and if you put a soild one in there it can't drain the whole area...do you mean a solid with a couple top drains?

UNISCAPER
12-04-2005, 06:36 PM
Yes. A wall would help the situation. In the scenario you gave I would opt for a CMU wall because of the height shown. If you use a segmental system, it will require backties of some sort, and since you have granite/decomposed granite in the slope, and have no real way of knowing where you are going to hit the solid once you open the hill up, you might end up soil nailing, which, is very expensive. CMU would come in for less. On top of the wall, install a brow ditch to grab the watewr befoe it heads over the top.

Now, I know you got the drain handled, so you might want to let the homeoner know you can't mix PVC and ABS pipe, no glue will bond the two. Anytime you do that you have to use a rubber mission coupler.

olderthandirt
12-04-2005, 06:58 PM
Before suggestions, whats the budget??? Anything can be done if the price is right

sheshovel
12-05-2005, 12:14 AM
There at the suggestion "Mabey we need to do something here "stage,can't get equipment back there,no way because from the back of the deck is all U.S.Forest land,and no road just hill.
The rock is very solid and big ,decomposing in spots...ya know what I mean?

olderthandirt
12-05-2005, 12:21 AM
There at the suggestion "Mabey we need to do something here "stage,can't get equipment back there,no way because from the back of the deck is all U.S.Forest land,and no road just hill.
The rock is very solid and big ,decomposing in spots...ya know what I mean?
Yep it means that when you give them a price its gonna be we'll think about it and let you know! ya know what I mean???

UNISCAPER
12-05-2005, 10:58 AM
A job like that based off the pictures is going to dance into the 90-100K range, perhaps alot more after all the particulars are disclosed.

jreiff
12-05-2005, 10:32 PM
What is is CMU wall?

sheshovel
12-06-2005, 01:39 AM
Yep it means that when you give them a price its gonna be we'll think about it and let you know! ya know what I mean???


Yes but I get some of those comming right back around two years later
with the money and a GO too,
so it does not hurt to give them a price

hole in one lco
12-06-2005, 01:49 AM
steel beams with timbers I take a pic of one i did last year.

UNISCAPER
12-06-2005, 10:35 AM
Concrete-Masson-Unit = CMU wall. In other words, 8-8-16 block, mortared with rebar in the footing and verticle bars every 16" in the cells. Then grout is poured in the cells, the back water proofed, etc etc. It's alot more work doing a CMU, but the best alternative for that space.

jreiff
12-06-2005, 09:34 PM
I see, thanks for the response Uniscaper.

Popper357
12-07-2005, 12:37 AM
Wow, that sounds like a lot of work. Do you fill up the entire wall. How do you prep the footer. Compact agg like a SRW, then form and pour a footer? I know of a job or too like this that has promise for me to get hired. Big job, big money.

UNISCAPER
12-07-2005, 10:44 AM
The depth of the footing is going to vary depending on where your freeze/thaw line is. We don't have to worry about that in California. I'll give you the specs for an Illinois wall. the freeze line is 42", so, you would havew to dig a 42" depth. The footing width is going to depend on wall hieght. A wall that size in the CMU spec book i j=have would require a 4' wide, 2' deep footing with a 9" keyway at the bottom of the middle. You set the rebar, call for inspection, and after it passes do a trench pour.
After it hardens just build your wall. The inspector might want to see the wall every X amount of feet, or he may let you buiuld the whole thing, inspect it, then grout it. Every cell gets filled. then finish the wall the way you want, stucco, tile, facade stone, whatever.

jreiff
12-11-2005, 12:24 AM
Any update on what you have decided to do?

Just wondering what you decided on doing and if you were doing a plan for it?

Would love to see what you came up with....

Dirty Water
12-11-2005, 12:32 AM
That looks to be a concrete wall that the home is on, perhaps a daylight basement of some sort? I would apply a waterproof lining to the house concrete wall, install proper drains, and backfill the entire area bringing the grade up to where it is farther back in this picture:

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=45248&d=1133686133

The whole area looks to be the left overs of overdig when they originally built the structure, and looks odd not backfilled to me. Perhaps if you had pictures from further back it would be easier to see where it is in relation to the property, as it is, to me it looks like a useless hole.

sildoc
12-11-2005, 02:54 AM
That looks to be a concrete wall that the home is on, perhaps a daylight basement of some sort? I would apply a waterproof lining to the house concrete wall, install proper drains, and backfill the entire area bringing the grade up to where it is farther back in this picture:

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=45248&d=1133686133

The whole area looks to be the left overs of overdig when they originally built the structure, and looks odd not backfilled to me. Perhaps if you had pictures from further back it would be easier to see where it is in relation to the property, as it is, to me it looks like a useless hole.

Exactly what I was thinking. Seal concrete then as follows
Drain 1 4" corigated on very bottom. back fill with 3inch drain rock. 2 feet thick
Drain 2 4 inch corigated fill with 2" drain rock.2 Feet.
Drain 3 3 -4" Corigated filled with 1" Drain Rock rest of the way up minus 1 foot.
Drain 6 on top 4 inch corigated filled over with decorative rock or such.
I am guessing it is an engineered foundation to begin with so you should not have to much of a problem with weight.
Reason for all the major drain pipes is to make sure that the wall will not leak. Drain pipe is cheap and is way better than digging it up and doing it right.
This is the most cost effictive way to do this from my stand point.

sheshovel
12-19-2005, 02:41 PM
double post

sheshovel
12-19-2005, 02:45 PM
I would have to build a wall at the end here also to hold the backfill you suggest back in place,it would also need to be backfilled by wheelbarrow and shovel over the back of the top of the hill.Good suggestions though sorry I had given up on this thread and did not see your replies tell today.
No I haven't still gathering ideas,they are not in any hurry and if they go for it the job is mine to do so no question about somebody taking it from me.

ChrisCoope
01-03-2006, 01:53 PM
Hi,

I think you need to deal with the first problem, drainage and then look at the second problem bank stabilisation..
this could be done using a product we have which you can see at www.timbergrid.com with very little excavation needed, it would require an engineer to figure the correct size and loadings.. the advantage would be you could deal with the water run off, and end up with a landscaped bank that wouldnt erode further.

good luck , Chris