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Slcareco
12-06-2005, 09:56 PM
Hey, I'm not sure if this is the right location of this forum to ask/post this but here it goes. I was wondering if anyone out there is looking for spring landscape designs for future jobs and projects who dont have the time to draft anything up. Post your comments and let me know. For more information, questions, comments PM me. Thanks

Scott,

allinearth
12-07-2005, 07:58 AM
How could an accurate design be done without visiting the site? I would like a way to take design load off in spring but wonder about the accuracy and usability of designs made strictly on paper.

Slcareco
12-07-2005, 12:35 PM
Well as you know and the boss's I have had most of the time orally give the client a visual of the project and most of the times the client mixes what there hearing with what they would love to see and bam "I love it when can you start?" right? I mean if people want a project thats in there imagination, then something on paper if not to scale, sketch or whatever gives the project a bit of an egde. Me personally would not agree to an oral presentation I want it all on paper so i can look at and go over and alter anyway i can till an agreement is made. So to answer your question what I draft is original and can be used as a gateway to other ideas such as what the client wants different from whats orignally proposed. I mean it's just like buying a landscape architect book with example drawings of houses you might never mimic but you branch off and take lil bits of ideas from it. Now depending on what you or your clients looking for unlike a published book I can put it into my drawning and depending on if you want just a sketch, detail, color, etc is up to you. If you have any other question feel free to PM me or reply back on this post all is welcome! Thanks

Scott,

Popper357
12-07-2005, 06:40 PM
No, I think data needed for a good design comes from reviewing the site and analyzing the materials, views, colors, textures, regional and neighborhood style and more. So your idea of mail order designs is pretty weird. And how would you know what type of plants will do well in a particular region? There's too many problems with this idea, any pro designer will recognize this. So you are trying to target a market of landscapers who don't know any better. Shame on you

Slcareco
12-07-2005, 07:04 PM
what are you talking about? I'm trying to help out the industry for those who don't have the time to sketch out ideas for projects that may help them. I'm not trying to scam anyone, if they don't want the help then ok but if they do I'd be more then happy to draft something up that they are looking for. Yes I have examples but of course I'm going to need your input on what is needed and even a survey would be greatly helpful. It's not something to be permenant just a guide of ideas for someone who doesn't have the time. For plant's in the right place and the culture I know becuase I've studied over a 100 woodys plants and still continue my study's. And theres a million books out there with all the information which I'm willing to do the research for. If no body wants the help then so be it just trying to aid those who need. Your comments are like saying why did you publish a landscaping book with plans that are no good to me or the region I live in? Why did you take the time to write a book about how to build a 2 story house? when I only want one story? Like i said its for those who don't have the time, and its not in everyones interests but thanks for your 2 cents.

RHayden
12-07-2005, 07:26 PM
I have a part-time lady who does drafting work for us whenever I get behind and she never visits the job sites. The key word here is drafting and not designing. She is able to take my field notes which include number and type of plants and a digital pic or two and then she prepares a scale drawing and an imaged print if needed. We've been doing this a number of years and it works out fine. We've even developed our own little short hand notes over the years that wouldn't mean jack to anyone else.

This saves me a bunch of time without the overhead of a staff designer and allows us to pick up many install jobs we might not otherwise be able to do simply because we were able to get back with potential customers quickly. I might add that I usually only do this for small to med size installs that are pretty straight forward.

So what slareco is suggesting is not all that weird and can, and is, being done. You could scan in your field notes and attach a digital pic etc. Email me at r.hayden@mchsi.com if you have any questions on how we do this.

Slareco- email me as well. I might need your services inthe spring.

Slcareco
12-07-2005, 07:32 PM
Thats great, I knew there were people out there that would understand but yes there are those who will always disagree. Well let me know because I'm here to help out if needed, but also don't want to take that womens job ethier, but I'll be sure to give you an email right after this reply.

Scott,

AGLA
12-07-2005, 11:55 PM
Landscapes are often fully designed long before a lot is cleared for construction. Having the ability to understand the site is not predicated on having been there. I have designed many landscapes without having been on the site. I don't think it is as big an issue as some of you do.

Having said that, I did have detailed survey information, a lot of experience reading plans, and a many years of walking sites with those plans which makes such plans a lot more easy to visualize to me than someone with less experience.

The flaws that I see in this distance drafting is that the amount of effort to give the drafter enough information may be greater than the effort saved by having someone else draft it, that you always lose a little information through communication (both when you speak and when someone else listens), and you are dealing with a drafter of a very young age who is unlikely to have the type of experience to assimilate all of this into much more than a simple plan that could be gained locally with less effort (no offense).

If all that is needed is a conceptual planting plan to give a client the idea of what it might look like, as suggested, it can be whipped up on site with far less effort than getting the house measurements, elevations, and general description of what you want designed to the distant drafter. Why bother with the effort and the expense?

How many times have you collected site information only to find that you need to return to the site for one or more additional measurements or other information. Now think about having someone else go to the site and get those measurements for you. Are you comfortable that you have enough info to work with? That is what you'd be asking someone else to do with your information.

Thirdly, this drafters profile says he is 18 years old. While I do not doubt that s/he has excellent drafting abilities, I would be hesitant to expect that there is a lot of years of practical experience reading topo plans, understanding plant placement and growth rates, grading and drainage, steps and retaining walls, ... There are two ways to mitigate the effects of this. One is to keep the designs simple. The other is to explain your design requirements in great detail. Either of those options reduces the value of going through the process to the point where it might not make a lot of sense.

Slcareco
12-08-2005, 12:21 AM
wow, I'm just looking to help out thanks.

kcook
12-10-2005, 10:59 PM
100 woody plants shouldnt be drafting big projects. That isnt even a hlaf semester of a college level plants course. Many La's never see the actual site,but there will be changes made with any drawing. :D