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View Full Version : Dump truck or Dump trailer


ripple
12-22-2005, 06:44 AM
I am sure this topic has been covered but I could use some opions. I am trying to decide between getting a dump truck or dump trailer to do my landscaping jobs. Mainly mulch delivery, firewood delivery, and spring and fall cleanup.
Can a 1 ton dump truck haul more(weight) than a 12' dump trailer?
And as far as mulch goes. How many yards of muclh can you get into a 1 ton dump vs a 12' dump trailer?

YardPro
12-22-2005, 08:05 AM
the trailer can carry more weight


we just ran into the same delima.. and went with the trailer..
the trailer was less expensive, would have less potential break downs, less to insure, and we did not need an additional driver for it.

jc1
12-22-2005, 08:14 AM
I had a chevy 3500 dump the insurance was higher then my 2500hd by almost grand a year. I got rid of it and bought a 6x12 dump trailer it had 20 inch sides. I added 2 more feet to them and I can fit 8 yards of mulch in it. With mulch and brush you can load it up ,but with soil its heavy and wont dump if you fill it higher than a foot to a foot and a half. What I like about the trailer the most is if its loaded and after hours at the dump site you can unhook and still use the truck easily.

Lux Lawn
12-22-2005, 10:03 AM
I have been thinking about the same thing lately,and for me the big thing may come down to the cost of the commercial insurance.It seems like it will be cheaper not only to buy the trailer vs. the dump truck up front but in the long run it might be a little cheaper as well.Plus for me I may be in the need for another plow truck next year some time so I could just get a nice 3/4 ton to pull the trailer.

LB1234
12-23-2005, 10:58 AM
We went with the trailer for a number of reasons. More volume, higher weight capacity, less maintenance (just hydraulics and brakes really), less insurance, less expensive (for our situation), lower to the ground so its much easier to unload mulch/stone, and much, much more versatile.

Downside...more wear/tear on the tow vehicle/s, more difficult to manuever...especially in urban areas, can be a pain in the arse to get loaded in some nurseries/landscape supply places cause of the total length of vehicle/trailer combo.

We use our dump trailer for equipment hauling, carrying pallets (2, might be able to get 3 never tried), mulch, stone, leaf 'box', demolition material removal, etc.

CutRight
12-23-2005, 05:19 PM
i have a 12' foot dump trailer and i use it for everything, with a 1 ton dump truck you lose payload weight to the weight of the truck in your GVW registration, so a 10,000 lb dump trailer can legally have a payload of about 8000 lbs or so...depends on the weight of your trailer. to be honest iv loaded mine up with 6 tons of top soil for a payload and she took it like a champ. the big CAT loaders at the local mine arent exactly precision machines....well its prolly just the drivers. but they have told me that they love loading my 12' trailer over trying to load the dump body of a 1 ton truck.

Metro Lawn
12-23-2005, 05:54 PM
Both have pros and cons. We went with the truck. Can go places a trailer won't. Hauls as much mulch as you can put in it. (about 8 yds with 4' sides) Will hold 16 yds of leaves with 8' sides. Will carry 4 yds of topsoil. Carries a salter in the winter. Can pull the loader..ect.

lpwhandyman
12-23-2005, 06:14 PM
I remember thinking long and hard on the same question of a truck or trailer. My buddy has a 12' dump trailer and I've helped him on a few jobs when he used it. The downfalls were that it was hard to move around the jobsite connected to a truck, slow to raise and lower, and not to mention I've never had good luck with trailer lights (in the process of switching to LED's). The pros of a trailer were easy to throw stuff in and out being lower to the ground, you can leave it at the jobsite witout the worry of extra drivers. I decided to go with a dump truck because I've wanted one for a while and already having a trailer for the mowers, another trailer for the pressure washer, and yet another trailer for the tools (couldn't pass up that deal for an enclosed trailer from brother-in-law), I just didn't want yet another trailer to hook and unhook. If I had to do over again, would I make the same decision....yes, but maybe a bigger truck. But for where we're at this point of the business, It works great and we have found a niche where we can service those small jobs where we can get in and get out and it works well for us.

ripple
12-24-2005, 03:23 PM
WOW!!! Thanks for all of the great replies! I am fairly new to the site but I am truly amazed at the size and wealth of knowledge here. I do belong to some other forums, but I really like this website. Anyway, I decide on the 3500 1 ton Chevy 1997. It has the pto driven dump which is really fast. The bonus was it already had a plow on it and I was in the market for another plow truck because of the growth in the past two snow seasons. METROLAWN..you are correct I did go pick up a load of mulch and was able to get 7 yds in the dump.
Thanks again for all the help and suggestions.

NEUSWEDE
12-24-2005, 10:31 PM
I have a 6x10 dump trailer with landscape gate. It is great for hauling materials or using for my mowers. The best part is the landscape gate you can run wheel barrels up it to dump in. You can fill the trailer with material and leave it onsite.

The only regret is that I wish I got the 12ft so I could fit 2 mowers.

I was going to sell mine but have since decided to keep it

defintely worth it.

Gravel Rat
12-25-2005, 12:55 AM
Around here if you pull a trailer on a regular basis for your business then you have to license the truck for the total weight of the truck and trailer just like a truck tractor. You also need a CDL to pull the trailer if it has a gvw heavier than 10,000lbs.

The other problem is you can't get a trailer into the places where the local landscapers go if you do you need a good 4x4 P/U to get it back out.

My insurance is about 1000 dollars a year that is for a 95 F-450 with a gvw of 15,000lbs and I have a motorcarrier number so I'am a licensed trucking company. Then take for instance my dads 96 F-150 costs 800 dollars a year and its a significantly lighter truck my tare weight is heavier than the gvw.

To license a truck and trailer for say 20,000lbs here you will need a motorcarrier number as it will be used commercially and the insurance will be around 1500-2000 dollars a year.

If you use a dump trailer you will be looking at replacing your trucks brakes every 6 months maybe every 3 months. You will be looking at probably rebuilding a transmission every year maybe every 2 years.

A decent 12,000lb dump trailer here your looking at spending 8-10,000 dollars you would have to haul allot of material to pay for that.

Most of the time if you need a large amount of material delivered its cheaper to higher a contractor with a tandem axle dump truck.

NEUSWEDE
12-25-2005, 09:37 AM
That might be how it is in BC but in the states it is different. You don't need a CDL here unless the total weight is over 26,000 lbs So if you get the 12,000gvw trailer you don't need to worry. As far as insurance you don't need motor-carrier here if your pulling that much.
Also the dump trailer won't put that much hurt on your truck. Dump trailers have electric brakes so you don't need to worry about the trucks brakes. Any truck weather it is pulling or has a load it is carrying the tranny needs to be taken care of like flushing it and replacing the filter once a year.
also you can get a 7x12 with 12,000 GVW for $7400
brand new dump truck your looking at between 27k and 43K
I think they are great especially for people starting out who don't have money to spend on dump trucks.
good luck in your decision




Around here if you pull a trailer on a regular basis for your business then you have to license the truck for the total weight of the truck and trailer just like a truck tractor. You also need a CDL to pull the trailer if it has a gvw heavier than 10,000lbs.

The other problem is you can't get a trailer into the places where the local landscapers go if you do you need a good 4x4 P/U to get it back out.

My insurance is about 1000 dollars a year that is for a 95 F-450 with a gvw of 15,000lbs and I have a motorcarrier number so I'am a licensed trucking company. Then take for instance my dads 96 F-150 costs 800 dollars a year and its a significantly lighter truck my tare weight is heavier than the gvw.

To license a truck and trailer for say 20,000lbs here you will need a motorcarrier number as it will be used commercially and the insurance will be around 1500-2000 dollars a year.

If you use a dump trailer you will be looking at replacing your trucks brakes every 6 months maybe every 3 months. You will be looking at probably rebuilding a transmission every year maybe every 2 years.

A decent 12,000lb dump trailer here your looking at spending 8-10,000 dollars you would have to haul allot of material to pay for that.

Most of the time if you need a large amount of material delivered its cheaper to higher a contractor with a tandem axle dump truck.

Eclipse
12-25-2005, 10:05 AM
In Michigan, I'm guessing all states are a little different, if you are pulling the 12k trailer with an F450, a 15k GVWR, you will need a CDL. A CDL is required when your truck and trailer GCWR exceeds 26,000 lbs. If you are using a 3/4ton or a 1 ton you are ok by not having a CDL.

Eclipse
12-25-2005, 10:34 AM
Also in Michigan, if you are pulling a trailer for commercial use and the GCWR exceeds 10k pounds you are required to have GVW plates. This really should not be an issue with the dump trailer in question because this applies to every LCO and given the requirements even the most simple operation (1/2 ton truck with a single 3500lb axle trailer) should be plated with GVW plates already.

Also in Michigan, by exceeding the 10,000 GCWR, you are required to have a USDOT number and the city and state in a minimum of 3" tall letters all displayed on the side of the truck.

There are many more requirements than the average person is aware of. I'm guessing 9 out of 10 LCO's do not meet the necessary requirements.

Gravel Rat
12-26-2005, 07:07 PM
Neuswede you must not have any hills where you live because electric trailer brakes are pretty feeble to stop a 12,000lb trailer I would rather have air or vacuum/hydraulic. There are alot of contractors here that use a 12,000lb equipment trailer to haul say skid steers or 6000lb mini the trailer brakes don't last. Constantly changing the magnets and brake pads and worn out drums if you have a 3/4 ton P/U and your trying to stop a 12,000lb trailer good luck.

I see many P/U trucks pulling big fivers and tounge type camp trailers over the summer you can cook eggs on the tow vehicals brakes they are so hot.

If I was pulling a 12,000lb trailer on a regular basis I would be using a F-450 or F-550 to pull it with. Atleast the truck has enough brakes to pull it with you pull it with a 1 ton truck and you do loose the trailer brakes you better have some paper and pen to write your will and testiment.

There are places where my F-450s brakes are powered out with a legal load truck grossing 15,000lbs I couldn't stop at the stop sign had to look both ways and roll through.

Dallas Turf
12-26-2005, 08:10 PM
A CDL is required when your truck and trailer GCWR exceeds 26,000 lbs, OR when your trailer exceeds 9,999 pounds. Have the ticket to prove it.

Gravel Rat
12-26-2005, 08:22 PM
All it takes is the DOT to come along with a set of portable scales and they can tell you if your overweight. Then the fines start then you start if you are overweight and if your not legal insurance and registration wise you could be slapped with some good fines.

The other thing you can have is they will make you leave the trailer on the side of the road and have it either towed with a bigger truck or remove some of the load on the trailer to make it legal.

You may get a warning or a fine for not having a CDL if the combination you have requires it. You may even have to leave the trailer on the side of the road and have a person with the proper DL come and drive the truck for you.

Travel'n Trees
01-17-2006, 03:54 AM
I guarntee I can spread a load of rock dirt or mulch faster in either one my dump trucks, than a dump trailer.

Jeff@SGLC.ca
01-19-2006, 07:04 PM
I may be in the market this spring for a dump as well. I have friends running dump trailers and one of them is getting rid of their 1 ton dump....it does have the short dump on it. I just don't want the hassle of hauling around the trailer on top of the truck. I'm in the need for another truck as well so that is where the truck with dump works out.

I was looking at the MultiVan dump body with side dump......you can tow a landscape trailer and still dump your load.

gammon landscaping
01-23-2006, 03:55 PM
come on gues i pull 11500 worth of trailer on a daily basis with a 250 and yes i have replaced truck and trailor brakes a couple of times in the last 3 years but nothing to concern me. i have electric brakes on my gooseneck and at the wieght i run i can't stop on a dime but as with any truck you need to drive knowing that. you are not in a honda you have to be careful all the time

ShieldsLandscaping
01-23-2006, 05:31 PM
Just remeber if you ever wanted to sell the trailer you can do so for almost the same price you got it. In my area its not uncommon for trailers to go for used almost the same price as new. If you ever felt like getting a dump truck instead after you got the trailer, then simply sell the trailer.

all ferris
01-23-2006, 07:09 PM
one bad thing about the dump trailer is that you can't get a wheel barrow under a coal chute unless it's an over the tire bed. I personally like the idea of the trailer.

olderthandirt
01-23-2006, 07:21 PM
You cant haul equipment on a trailor if your trailors full of mulch. Dump truck and then tow your equipment on a regular trailor

YardPro
01-23-2006, 08:56 PM
trailEr... trailEr
lol
you old fogeys ....

true ... But on the truck you have so many more maintenance costs... that may not be much of a cost benefit.

Jpocket
01-24-2006, 12:58 PM
Gravel Rat if your replacing brakes on a truck every 6 monhts than something is wrong with the truck or the operator can't drive.

Gravel Rat
01-25-2006, 10:45 PM
When your dealing with 8-10% grades daily trucks brakes don't last personally I would never own a truck bigger than a 550 with juice brakes its got to be "FULL" air no air over hydraulics.