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treedoc1
01-28-2006, 08:41 AM
Just finished this job after another sub bowed out. Pool was in place prior to us starting. Slope was in excess of 1:1. Only had 7' from edge of pool to property line on back wall. Wall was keystone angle standard and 14 courses tall (10.5'). Dug out and compacted base material to subsoil. Geo engineer ok'd base. Base level ended up being the 10' wide(yes went beyond property line but was within limits when wall appeared out of ground after final grading), dug a 12" deep by 30" wide sub base for first course to lay on. Fabric every 3 courses (6' wide per engineering). Filled totally with clean 57's...no soils. Front of buried 4 base courses was compacted soils to form the required wedge.

Needed mini ex for 2 days to make initial cuts. Built plywood ramp to slide stone down for backfill. Brought stone from driveway to ramp with new holland skid steer. From that point all other work done by hand. Final tally 180 tons of 57's, 750 standard units at 100 pounds each (37.5 tons) and a few caps and fence posts. 5 men 8 days from start to final cleanup. Don't you hate winter work...Production slows down, but cash flow is a priority.

MarcusLndscp
01-28-2006, 10:06 AM
Hi Treedoc
Your wall job looks real clean. Gotta love those jobs where you have to man handle all your material instead of using equipment. Are you going to do the patio between the wall and the pool as well?
Nice work!

klkanders
01-28-2006, 10:09 AM
Some people just gotta have a pool........looks nice! Im sure it made a costly pool even more expensive. Thanks for the pics!

PurpHaze
01-28-2006, 12:26 PM
Looks very nice. Is the fence on top going to be for securing the pool area or for privacy so the owners can skinny dip?

Edgewater
01-28-2006, 12:43 PM
I would also like to know what is going to be used around the pool. Can pavers be set on top of the clean stone??

Adam

bigviclbi
01-28-2006, 01:12 PM
What are the wall blocks on the inside of the wall (the ones buried in the aggragate) for?

GreenMonster
01-28-2006, 03:05 PM
dug a 12" deep by 30" wide sub base for first course to lay on. Fabric every 3 courses (6' wide per engineering). Filled totally with clean 57's...no soils. Front of buried 4 base courses was compacted soils to form the required wedge.


Nice work, Doc. Boy, looks like you moved a lot of stone by hand? Sometimes all the equipment in the world just can't get the job done for you. Looks like it was a real challenge. Nicely done.

In your quote above, are you saying you only dug 12" deep, which would bury about 2 block, then backfilled in front of 2 more, to bury 4 total?

Also, you're saying grid every 3 course, not fabric, right? Did you geo eng have anything to say about completely filling with stone in the reinforcement zone? In other words, the stone will completely lock the grid w/o any fines?

I don't know about you guys, but I just don't care for the look of beveled face....

cgland
01-28-2006, 03:22 PM
Did the engineer have anything to do with placing the fence posts? Typically most engineers will place them 3' behind the face of the wall. In this application you would have to install sonotubes in the backfill zone. This way is a pain in the azz, especially when you are dealing with multiple pulls of grid. It just seems to me that of you had any load or force placed on that fence you will kick out some block or compromise the wall.:nono:

Chris

cgland
01-28-2006, 04:17 PM
Bigvic - Those are the wall block. It looks like Keystone or similar. They are very deep block (and heavy)

Chris

bigviclbi
01-28-2006, 08:05 PM
Wall looks awesome, but those blocks are ugly. CGLAND does that mean those blocks are like 24" deep?

mbella
01-28-2006, 08:23 PM
Ahh, you gotta love the "slide the stone down the plywood ramp because there's no access" method.

I too am curious about the method of installing the fence posts. I assume you did it that way because if you placed them three feet behind the wall, there wouldn't be much room for a pool deck. I'd like to hear what exactly you did there though.

Is there concrete involved?

sheshovel
01-28-2006, 08:56 PM
They are going to be sososo sorry they put that pool with those tree's around!Good work..looks nice and neat and well done for having to pick it up from a sub walk away

cgland
01-28-2006, 09:40 PM
Bigvic-I do believe those block are 18" deep or so. The cap is 12" with a 1"-2" overhang.

Chris

Squizzy246B
01-29-2006, 01:08 AM
A great looking job, even better when you had to take over where somebody else left off. Experience, good engineering, the right gear and enough labour = quality work. Love it.

treedoc1
01-29-2006, 01:39 PM
The blocks have 2 open cells, one in the front, one to the rear. The post is normally installed in the rear, but the home owner needed every inch. That meant the cap stone had to be cut instead of a clean line. The blocks are 8" deep and the post is installed 3 blocks deep with concrete poured in the cells.

The base was dug into the sub soil about 3'. The additional 12" was a deeper trench just for the base course. The depth of the subsurface helps the wedge.

The engineer and the manufacturer actually preferred the clean stone fill without any soil.

Those blocks are made for a fence post install on the edge of the wall. http://www.keystonewalls.com/pages/Contractor_pages/C_stand.unit.html

The surface of the deck will be a 4" thick concrete pour. I prefer a mortar base with a flagstone top, but it's not my money.

Thanks for the kind comments. Rock walls are our bread and butter but this product really fit the bill for structural strength in a limited area.

mbella
01-29-2006, 07:37 PM
The blocks have 2 open cells, one in the front, one to the rear. The post is normally installed in the rear, but the home owner needed every inch. That meant the cap stone had to be cut instead of a clean line. The blocks are 8" deep and the post is installed 3 blocks deep with concrete poured in the cells.

The base was dug into the sub soil about 3'. The additional 12" was a deeper trench just for the base course. The depth of the subsurface helps the wedge.

The engineer and the manufacturer actually preferred the clean stone fill without any soil.

Those blocks are made for a fence post install on the edge of the wall. http://www.keystonewalls.com/pages/Contractor_pages/C_stand.unit.html

The surface of the deck will be a 4" thick concrete pour. I prefer a mortar base with a flagstone top, but it's not my money.

Thanks for the kind comments. Rock walls are our bread and butter but this product really fit the bill for structural strength in a limited area.

Treedoc, thanks for the explanation. Some new info. for me.

I hear ya on the flag, but like you said, it's their money.

kris
01-31-2006, 08:55 AM
Assuming 8 hour days ....320 man-hrs does seem a bit high but with your access and time of year its really not bad at all.

Very nice.

Mike33
02-02-2006, 01:02 AM
Looks good, I build alot of walls myself using allen block. Wondering how you made out with the fence posts and geo-grid? I guess we could say that is still a pretty hefty sur-charge on that wall.
mike

treedoc1
02-02-2006, 07:48 AM
The entire backfill was clean 57's and only 7-10' wide. Most of that shear force is gone. The grid and the 57's will hold the poured deck when it is done. The poured deck will also provide a cap for the shedding of additional water.

UNISCAPER
02-02-2006, 10:13 AM
Job looks great. The blocks look like Keystone Standard units. They make a fence post cap if you ever need to do a fence on top again. Keep those cells free of gravel, drop the post, slide the cap right over the post, fill with hydraulic or quick set concrete. STS rated.

Mike33
02-02-2006, 04:01 PM
Yea goog idea, i many time over kill with clean agg. It will pay long term dividends.