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View Full Version : Who is going to help me rip this off?


Drafto
01-31-2006, 10:57 PM
The home owner wants a wider stoop. I thought about building around the current one and overlaying pavers, but doing that I would have to cut the railing and place it in my block further out. The stoop is 50 years old and has some slight chipping occurring.

Here is my question. I have never removed one of the these, what can I expect if I do? It does not appear to be attached to the foundation, are they normally? Are these things solid concrete or is it mostly stone under there? Any help is always appreaciated.

Thanks,

Dan

cgland
01-31-2006, 11:02 PM
It was most likely poured in place w/ possibly some rebar tying into the foundation. You will probably have to patch a couple of holes in the foundation once it is removed.

Chris

Drafto
01-31-2006, 11:20 PM
That sounds expensive to remove. I just don't like building around these, if I was veneering like Mbella does I would feel fine. But adding 12" to each side and expecting it not to settle sounds just as expensive as removing it.

Dan

Squizzy246B
01-31-2006, 11:35 PM
We just run the Quick-Cut along the top step and check out the constructuction. Often they are formed with brickwork and then poured. Smack it around with a sledge hammer and if its not pinned to the house pull it out with an excavator. If it is we just keep making cuts from the lowest point and work our way up with the sledge hammer.

Dirty Water
01-31-2006, 11:37 PM
I used to pour those for a living.

Usually we would form it up out of wood, and rough fill it in with reject sand.

There is probably about 4-6" of concrete before you hit sand/rock whatever.

There will be rebar running along each step and tied into the foundation usually.

Drafto
01-31-2006, 11:44 PM
I used to pour those for a living.

Usually we would form it up out of wood, and rough fill it in with reject sand.

There is probably about 4-6" of concrete before you hit sand/rock whatever.

There will be rebar running along each step and tied into the foundation usually.

Hey Jon. How confident are you? Are we betting even up, or with the spread?

Dan

sheshovel
01-31-2006, 11:54 PM
Heck don't worry about the railings they look like crap anyway!I would try to sell them on a new porch
BIGGER and farther out and semi rounded in the front + a new walkway leading up and matching it.
Maybe something more like this
Disclaimer..I am a lousy paint user..do not hold it against me!
you get the basic idea though

hortiscape
02-01-2006, 11:33 AM
I would pull it out anyway, I say pull it out because if it is seperated from the house it should do just that. The security of building your work on your work is worth the time. If it is attached the scoring and bashing method works great for us. Always do your work from the ground up. That way there is no question.

PurpHaze
02-01-2006, 09:32 PM
Heck don't worry about the railings they look like crap anyway!I would try to sell them on a new porch BIGGER and farther out and semi rounded in the front + a new walkway leading up and matching it.

I'm with SS on this one. Replace the damn thing and the railings. I'm not crazy about the rounded look but if someone posted a decent picture of a rounded stoop you might get my vote then. :p

Drafto
02-01-2006, 09:45 PM
Since I have never done one of these:

How many man hours do you think it will take to get if off? And what tools/equipment besides an excavator and obvious saw and hammers?

Dan

PurpHaze
02-01-2006, 09:47 PM
Those guys on that house show would have it gone in about 10 seconds but they'd use one BMF excavator. :p

CNYScapes
02-01-2006, 09:50 PM
two guys with a demo saw and a sledge hammer, loaded in to the truck in under 2 hours plus time to go to dump and dumping fees. Put on your safety glasses!

DUSTYCEDAR
02-01-2006, 09:53 PM
i would bet it is tied into the threshold of the door
i ripped out 1 like and took the threshold and the door with it what fun
1 little piece of rebar held it all togeather and out it came with a backho

sheshovel
02-01-2006, 09:53 PM
I'm with SS on this one. Replace the damn thing and the railings. I'm not crazy about the rounded look but if someone posted a decent picture of a rounded stoop you might get my vote then. :p

You neglected to read my disclaimer Purple!
Just remove the railings and bash the sucker out!

PurpHaze
02-01-2006, 10:04 PM
You neglected to read my disclaimer Purple!
Just remove the railings and bash the sucker out!

I thought your disclaimer was about your ability to draw pretty lines. :p

I'm all for bashing though.

Dreams To Designs
02-02-2006, 07:46 AM
Dan, have done quite a few of these and I'm with Dirty Water on this one. Most likely just formed and poured over scrap. You can always bore a few test holes to see how thick the concrete is. Go with what Squizzy says and make a saw cut where the stoop meets the foundation to lessen the chance of damage there and start ripping. Are you replacing the walkway also? If so, a skid steer with a set of forks will be very helpful with removal along with a jack hammer to break up and control the pieces. Realistically, without incident, I would figure about half a day for removal. So in the world of Murphy's law, figure a day's time for removal and cleanup.

Kirk

PurpHaze
02-02-2006, 08:21 AM
Realistically, without incident, I would figure about half a day for removal. So in the world of Murphy's law, figure a day's time for removal and cleanup.

Kirk

Now there's a man that thinks like me. Have a realistic time table but be prepared in the event things don't go right. And if they do go right then you move on to the next step quicker. Gives you a little leeway in the overall project. :waving:

Dreams To Designs
02-02-2006, 10:45 AM
Hayes, I've just learned from experience to double the amount of time most people quote when there are unknowns involved. It's easier to finish early and have spare time, then to take too long and make promises you can't keep.

Dan, there is another alternative I have used. By building walls on either side of the stoop, removing the steps and continuing the wall across the front, you can increase the size of the stoop. You fill in any voids with 3/4 minus and some stone dust, use fabric over the fill and existing stoop, sand and lay pavers over it all. Then you can build steps off the front in any configuration you so choose to go along with the new sidewalk. Your just using the existing stoop as part of the base material. The key is to get good compaction on any of the fill base around the stoop.

Kirk

MarcSmith
02-02-2006, 12:11 PM
I had a similar stoop at my house. it was not solid through and through, nor was it attached to the house. but the foundation did have two arms that came out to support the stoop, but they were not attached to the stoop. Just becareful it you start going at it with power tools or excavators, you dont' want to damage the foundation.

SuburbanTurf&ScapesInc.
02-04-2006, 06:43 PM
but the foundation did have two arms that came out to support the stoop, but they were not attached to the stoop. Just becareful it you start going at it with power tools or excavators, you dont' want to damage the foundation.

Marc, the two arms you speak of, are actually part of the "footprint" of the home(or foundation). I have a customer with a $900,000 home, 3 years old and the brick stoop was separating from the house. bricks coming loose, etc. Turns out whoever installed did not build on the "arms", if he made it 2' wider he could have used the footprint as foundatin of stoop. That moron, a job like that should last at least 20 years.
but your absolutely right marc, be carefull not to crack foundation.

chriscampbell
02-05-2006, 08:45 PM
a jack hammer would help the process move along