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View Full Version : Best soulution for a narrow area?


CRUZMISL
02-03-2006, 04:08 PM
Hi All,
I have an area that is approx. 100' in length, 20' wide with a sidewalk running down the middle. The area has a wooden fence on one side (of the length) and the street on the other.

I'm curious how you would tackle the irrigation without watering the road or soaking the fence. I only have 2 zones to work with and a max GPM of 9 to 10 gallons per zone.

Thanks!

Joe

Wet_Boots
02-03-2006, 04:58 PM
Going strictly by the book, and assuming a four foot walk in the exact middle, you get two strips 8x100, and with less than 10 gpm and at least 30 psi at the heads, you could use side strip sprays, in a double row on each strip. Nothing (much) on the fence, sidewalk, or road. Rainbird makes special left-corner and right-corner side strip nozzles, but you don't have enough water to space everything head-to-head.

CRUZMISL
02-03-2006, 05:13 PM
Sorry, I should have mentioned the sidewalk is 4' from the road so it's not centered.....
It's a tough spot with the gpm and zones I have to work with....

bicmudpuppy
02-03-2006, 06:58 PM
so we have a 4x100 and a 12x100. The 4x100 using 2 -ESTs and 3 CSTs would give you about 5gpm. This isn't fantastic coverage, but you would get everyting "Wet" and only water turf. The 12x100 could be done with 11 heads. 2 12Qs and 912Hs. I would space 6 heads on one side and 5 on the other with 10' between each head. This means a 20' spacing per side. Again, this isn't a great coverage answer, but it would be minimum coverage with no overspray and we are talking about 13gpm.

Wet_Boots
02-03-2006, 08:01 PM
As mentioned, 4x100 is a piece of cake for one zone. To do the 12x100 on a single zone, with your 9-10 gpm, means using 18 heads, 9 a side, giving you 12 foot square spacing. As much as one might like to have head-to-head spacing, you don't have enough flow for those 18 heads unless they have 8 foot radius nozzles. That layout would use 8 gpm at 30 psi. (sometimes more is less) ~ not a textbook layout, but it will cover if you have the pressure.

If it was my fence, I'd plant a bed along its entire length, and use low-angle rotors along the sidewalk and just overthrow into the bed. 6 little rotors would do it.

PurpHaze
02-03-2006, 09:05 PM
LOL... Heeeeeere we go again. Freakin' narrow areas and whether to throw across a sidewalk or not. :p

Wet_Boots
02-03-2006, 09:46 PM
All this twiddly-ass stuff makes you appreciate large turf, don't it?

CRUZMISL
02-03-2006, 09:52 PM
He he, no argument there as I could care less. Besides timer is usually set to water at 5am.

I was considering using the MP2000's in a staggered/alternating configuration every 15 feet or so. They will get a bit of the fence but shouldn't be too bad since the radius is 20ft. The gpm @ 50psi is .83 so flow shouldn't be an issue and I could have 10 on each zone which is more than I need.

Something like a layout below ehre the circles represent a head. Sorry for the line. It's the only way it would show the layout correctly.

o


__________o



o


__________o



o


__________o

Thoughts?

PurpHaze
02-03-2006, 10:14 PM
You're basically describing a triangular layout versus a square layout where sprinklers would be across from each other. It'll work fine but you just have to watch the ends. Too close and too much water. Too far and you'll have drying out at the ends. With something like the MP-Rotators you could put the last ones closer to the ends and then tone down the arc. Not perfect but you're facing one of those situations where you wished you had more GPM which would offer a lot more alternatives. :waving:

Wet_Boots
02-03-2006, 10:53 PM
If you can get the sidewalk wet, then it's all too easy. Six heads on a side in 20 foot square spacing. Six heads per zone. Hunter #5 for the halves and #2 for the corners. Or if you want it to look really pretty, use Toro 300's with 02 nozzles.

Now, if you're a real cheapskate, you could run four heads on one side of the strip, two in the corners and two in between, and on the opposite side, three half-circle heads. Then, the whole shebang could be a single zone. #2's in the corners and #4's for the halves (spraying slightly less than the quarters are, so it all balances out)

Prepare for Texans to show up and yell at you for overthrowing the sidewalk,

advanced irrigation
02-03-2006, 11:56 PM
:realmad: :realmad: :realmad:

im a Texan and have no problem with that. :drinkup:

PurpHaze
02-04-2006, 09:08 AM
All this twiddly-ass stuff makes you appreciate large turf, don't it?

Gotta love it. At least in large turf areas there is room to roam and stretch out the legs. :p

bicmudpuppy
02-04-2006, 10:46 PM
:realmad: :realmad: :realmad:

im a Texan and have no problem with that. :drinkup:
You want to post a TIL# with that statement? There are enough honest Texas irrigators on here that feel an obligation to the rules and regulations to make that statement unhealthy.

PurpHaze
02-05-2006, 11:00 AM
Ooooh, ooooh... cat fight? :p

advanced irrigation
02-05-2006, 12:58 PM
regardless if you are watering on both sides of the walk it is going to get wet anyway, especially if you are in a windy area. i would try to avoid it if at all possible but sometime in my opinion is acceptible. most of the water on the walk will run off in the grass anyway. i am a licensed irrigator in Texas.:p

PurpHaze
02-05-2006, 01:08 PM
I have to admit that I treat interior sidewalks as invisible on rare occasions. Sometimes the angles, size and resulting turf areas as a result of the construction just don't equate to efficient watering. In those rare occasions I will throw water over the sidewalks and this is normally 1-2 am. By the time the site opens up in the morning there is no more moisture than normal for overspray on the sidewalks.

CRUZMISL
02-05-2006, 01:25 PM
I agree, it's one thing to water at 7pm when everyone wants to walk around but who really cares when watering at 2am? It's easier to adjust watering time than try and avoid the sidewalk in my case.

Wet_Boots
02-05-2006, 01:28 PM
The 'Texans' remark was relating to another thread, and the contention that some localities in Texas had specific regulations against overthrowing sidewalks. I wouldn't know about that personally. Obviously, we jump through whatever hoops we're forced to, and logic need not apply. Too my thinking, three-in-the-morning sidewalk overthrow is a complete non-issue, especially when it's still a struggle to get folks to comply with backflow protection rules.
(<i>"You mean that brass doohickey has to be <u>that</u> high off the ground?!"</i>)

PurpHaze
02-05-2006, 01:34 PM
I agree with everyone. Whatever the local codes or practices allow should be what dictates what a designer/installer adheres to. :)