PDA

View Full Version : Using Dirty Water


Faulted1
02-06-2006, 02:22 PM
I have a customer that has an existing "irrigation system". He is currently using impact rotors on pipe stands to water a nursery of small potted trees and he is getting water from a stream next to the property. This is more agriculture based than commercial or residential. The property is located next to a residential area and he needs to plant and water a new hedge row of 500 feet. I would suggest inline drip tubing on city water but the tap fees would be much much more than the system costs. Is it possible to use drip on stream water? He mentioned past problems with debris in the water so certainly filters would be required. Since city water is not an option, what would you recommend?

skurkp
02-06-2006, 03:10 PM
Before I would dod any work on the system I would do some research on the water right that he is taking from the stream. I believe in Texas you can not just take water from a stream because the state has the rights to the water. I would find out if there is something legal needed first. Then if anything happens he can not just say so-n-so did the irrigation. Just my 2 cents.

PurpHaze
02-06-2006, 07:04 PM
I'd put a filter on it or you'll be replacing a lot of emitters. :)

Dirty Water
02-06-2006, 07:16 PM
Put a Spindown filter on it, (100 mesh or so) at the pump.

And put a 150 mesh inline filter on each drip zone.

BTW, Despite the name, I'm not the resident dirty water expert :laugh:

PurpHaze
02-06-2006, 07:22 PM
I was just about to post that he should use you to install the system. :dizzy:

sheshovel
02-06-2006, 07:55 PM
Absolutly not,aquatic eggs would hatch inside the system filters or not and clog the ststem..Drip is for clean water systems only

Dirty Water
02-06-2006, 08:16 PM
Absolutly not,aquatic eggs would hatch inside the system filters or not and clog the ststem..Drip is for clean water systems only

Right.....:rolleyes:

Let me elaborate on something. We have hundreds and hundreds of miles of irrigation ditch in the Olympic Peninsula, most of these ditches are well over a century old and were originally dug out when the peninsula was a fertile farming area.

Because of all these ditches, we have many many accounts that use this "dirty" water.

All it requires is a good filter on the pump and inline filters on the drip. Every year when the system is started up, all the filters get removed, rinsed off and reinstalled.

Perhaps you should go down to texas or Eastern WA, and see the hundred and hundreds of miles of drip being fed off dirty water in the farms there.

:)

PurpHaze
02-06-2006, 09:42 PM
Absolutly not,aquatic eggs would hatch inside the system filters or not and clog the ststem..Drip is for clean water systems only

Maybe he wants to start a fishery instead then??? :p

I don't usually disagree with you Sheshovel but if the "dirty water" is properly filtered then there shouldn't be much problem. When I worked in Oregon we pulled right out of the creek for our irrigation water with nothing more than a mesh screen over the intake. We cleaned this off every week to ten days and had no problems. We added a wye filter onto the drip zones we had and there were no problems. And this water was taken out of the confluence of Spring Creek and the Williamson River that has some of the best fishing in south-central Oregon. I never saw any dead aquatic eggs (hatched or otherwise) in the five years I was there. Now... mare's eggs were a whole different thing. :)

sheshovel
02-06-2006, 10:01 PM
well then read my sig line on this one i guess.

PurpHaze
02-06-2006, 10:07 PM
LMAO! (Slapped up the side of my face.) :dizzy: Hopefully soon my eyes will stop rolling.

bicmudpuppy
02-06-2006, 10:56 PM
Every time we mention "dirty water" for irrigation, I think of those newer style septic systems that pump the excess water "somewhere". I've seen rotary sprinklers used for these in a lot of cases. I don't know what type of seperator is used, but I do know there is one. Filtering surface water (or bad well water) for irrigation isn't that big of a deal unless the water is actually more sediment or debris than water. Jon's example of 100 mesh and then 150 later is great example of how to handle it. If the water in this stream tends to run "muddy" from time to time, I might suggest a more coarse screen first, then the 100. As to the screens at the zones, it would depend on the type of drip. Pick a screen fine enough to catch anything that won't go through. Some drip equipment is spec'd to need 200 mesh filtration, while others only ask for 100. Most extruded emmiters are somewhere in between and the 150 is great advice (even if 100 is all that is spec'd. better safe than sorry).

Dirty Water
02-06-2006, 11:05 PM
All of my city's public areas are irrigated with reclaimed water...its supposed to be cleaner than potable water, but they still have purple sprinklers and lids and signs telling people to avoid contact with the water.

I should mention that on all of our pump setups we have a screen on the pump suction line as well, Its large enough to stop debris, but most sediment gets through.

Something like this, though with much finer screen:

http://www.pondsolutions.com/images/pump-s8.jpg

Faulted1
02-07-2006, 12:13 PM
Does anyone have experience with the Rainbird Automatic Filter kit? Or could suggest a similar product. The owner does not want to backflush filters manually.

Second, regarding drip specs -- can anyone recommend the most tolerant spec-ed drip.

Thanks for all of the previous advice!

Dirty Water
02-07-2006, 07:08 PM
Faulted, you can put a solinoid valve on the filter flush line, set up a program on the timer that opens it for a minute once a week.

bicmudpuppy
02-07-2006, 09:52 PM
Faulted, you can put a solinoid valve on the filter flush line, set up a program on the timer that opens it for a minute once a week.
Or use a quality timer that will allow an interval of once a month even :)

PurpHaze
02-07-2006, 10:21 PM
Maybe they have dirtier dirty water in WA so that's why they need it once a week? :p

bicmudpuppy
02-07-2006, 10:30 PM
Maybe they have dirtier dirty water in WA so that's why they need it once a week? :p
ROFLMAO, if it gets dirty enough, do we call in a plumber instead of an irrigator? I saw a flush valve on a sand filter once that was setup using relays to run a lighting type timer. They set it up so that the timer ran from the MV circuit. They added the extra on and off pins so that every time the system was on for either 6 or 8 hours (I don't remember now, but it seemed like a very short interval), the valve flushed. The valve was actuated by a seperate relay that re-set after the power was off so it only flushed for a short time. Something like 5 minutes. The filter being flushed was about 42" high and 2' around. The well guys installed it because it was a heavy sand well, but the only water around. The irrigation company before me installed the fancy flush setup. I told them if it crapped out a seperate irrigation timer or better overall timer was a better solution.

PurpHaze
02-08-2006, 08:39 AM
ROFLMAO, if it gets dirty enough, do we call in a plumber instead of an irrigator?

If it gets any dirtier maybe we should call a pornographer for them? :p

I saw a flush valve on a sand filter once that was setup using relays to run a lighting type timer. They set it up so that the timer ran from the MV circuit. They added the extra on and off pins so that every time the system was on for either 6 or 8 hours (I don't remember now, but it seemed like a very short interval), the valve flushed. The valve was actuated by a seperate relay that re-set after the power was off so it only flushed for a short time. Something like 5 minutes. The filter being flushed was about 42" high and 2' around. The well guys installed it because it was a heavy sand well, but the only water around. The irrigation company before me installed the fancy flush setup. I told them if it crapped out a seperate irrigation timer or better overall timer was a better solution.

I know I've posted this pic before but it sounds kinda like this Lakos filter we had to install on one of our pumps due to sand and scale. The blue valve is a $1200 automatic ball valve that makes a 1/4 turn when it's on and then makes another 1/4 turn to shut off. It's controlled by a circuit board and dipp switches under the cover. We have it come on every night for three minutes when the pump is on to flush out the debris it's trapped the previous 24 hours.

Dirty Water
02-08-2006, 08:00 PM
I bet you I could build a automatic ball valve using a stepper motor for a lot less than $1200 :)

PurpHaze
02-08-2006, 08:32 PM
I bet you I could build a automatic ball valve using a stepper motor for a lot less than $1200 :)

I bet you could. This valve is what Lakos recommended and hey, it wasn't my money. :)