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View Full Version : Weed Control for Everyone in Ariz


ArizPestWeed
02-26-2006, 11:36 PM
In Arizona , they are gonna legalize herbicide use to everyone , except those who offer weed control as the only thing they do , all others , landscapers , maintenance people ,lot boys at car dealerships , anyone will be able to use it , no licenses needed .
That's gonna screw me out of a lot of money.
Does anyone else in any other states have this problem or is it against the law to use herbicide without a license ?????

GrazerZ
02-27-2006, 07:46 AM
sorry to hear that. Here in Maine I anticipate it getting more strict, not less. Call and complain...

turf hokie
02-27-2006, 09:49 AM
Buy a lawn mower and cut your neighbors lawn for 10 bucks and now you are a landscaper....:hammerhead:

Grassmechanic
02-27-2006, 10:14 AM
In Arizona , they are gonna legalize herbicide use to everyone , except those who offer weed control as the only thing they do , all others , landscapers , maintenance people ,lot boys at car dealerships , anyone will be able to use it , no licenses needed .
That's gonna screw me out of a lot of money.
Does anyone else in any other states have this problem or is it against the law to use herbicide without a license ?????
That's a violation of Fed. law (FIFRA). I doubt it will stand.

NickN
02-27-2006, 10:32 AM
This is for non-restricted use herbicides only.Same stuff a homeowner can buy at Lowes.
What happened is two landscapers were fined for not having their pesticide license while spraying Round-Up.They fought the fine and the state judge found the law as unconstitutional.In other words,if a homeowner can spray it,so can an LCO.As an advocate of states rights,I see nothing wrong with the state itself making this decision.Kinda like each state having its own laws regarding landscaping.Some need certification,some don't.

PGA
02-27-2006, 11:07 AM
Here in KS it is legal to everyone.


Companies are required to have certification ONLY if you charge for applications.

Alot of people get around that by inlcluding weed control and other applications in the price of their mowing and that way they arent singling out applications.

I know I didnt explain that well :hammerhead:

ArizPestWeed
02-27-2006, 11:32 AM
This is for non-restricted use herbicides only.Same stuff a homeowner can buy at Lowes.
What happened is two landscapers were fined for not having their pesticide license while spraying Round-Up.They fought the fine and the state judge found the law as unconstitutional.In other words,if a homeowner can spray it,so can an LCO.As an advocate of states rights,I see nothing wrong with the state itself making this decision.Kinda like each state having its own laws regarding landscaping.Some need certification,some don't.
I remember reading in the paper about the 2 or so companies that were caught and were fighting it .
Did not know the rest , how is it you know so much ?

Az Gardener
02-27-2006, 11:42 AM
It is still in process not voted on yet Alca and our lobbyist is against it but because of some other things. The simple fact is that people who are operating illegally continued to spray dispite the law while law abiding citizens like myself stopped. So I could get someone in to spray weeds but I could find no one that would spray for garden pests, like spider mites, psylliads, grubs and the like. I don't blame anyone there is probably no money in it. The "gardeners clause" does need to be reinstated. If it is an existing client and the treatment is incidental to the overall project/contract, and the products are available over the counter. That is the gist of the old gardeners clause as it was prior to new legislation about 5 years ago.

NickN
02-27-2006, 12:02 PM
I read green industry related articles.

Az Gardener
02-27-2006, 12:13 PM
Nick are you autistic? What else? Surely there is more.

PGA
02-27-2006, 12:18 PM
I think the difference is if a homeowner sprayed something on his yard and did damage or God forbid hurt someone else that was on his property its his problem.

If an LCO does it then he AND the homeowner could be held responsible for it and that could lead back to the manufactuer and then it could be headed for new laws within the state and pretty soon its a clusterf**k.

IMO all states should have the right to set their own laws regarding it. All states are different and you cant have a blanket law for the whole country.

NickN
02-27-2006, 12:55 PM
Yes.I'm so autistic that I can find an article related to this,yet you can't and you live in the same state as where this is taking place.

6'7 330
02-27-2006, 01:13 PM
In Illinois, a license and insurance is required for commercial applicators to apply pesticides legally.

NickN
02-27-2006, 01:30 PM
Here is the latest article.It's probably a done deal.It was the state senate instead of judge that changed the law.My mistake.
http://www.pestcontrolmag.com/landscape/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=302291

turf hokie
02-27-2006, 02:24 PM
NY now requires that the chemical or fertilizer part of the contract be seperate, there is no such thing as a full service contract in the state any more. OR at least that is the way it is suppposed to be.

But a homeowner can buy Dimension at HD at the .15 AI while I cannot buy anything higher that .07 AI without a license at Lesco. I asked the DEC why this is possible and they said it has to do with the way the label is worded.

And here I thought it was about the product inside the bag.......there will always be a loophole for the homeowner to apply to his own yard and the guy with the license will always stay in the spotlight.

Grassmechanic
02-27-2006, 02:57 PM
This is for non-restricted use herbicides only.Same stuff a homeowner can buy at Lowes.
What happened is two landscapers were fined for not having their pesticide license while spraying Round-Up.They fought the fine and the state judge found the law as unconstitutional.In other words,if a homeowner can spray it,so can an LCO.As an advocate of states rights,I see nothing wrong with the state itself making this decision.Kinda like each state having its own laws regarding landscaping.Some need certification,some don't.
Like i stated, it's a violation of FEDERAL law. The state judge has no business even ruling on it. This sounds as if a judge is legislating from the bench.:dizzy:

Az Gardener
02-27-2006, 09:14 PM
I talked to the director of ALCA Az Landscape Contractors Assoc. Today she said the bill has passed the senate but still needs to pass the house before it will become law, and as of now it is not on the schedule for this week but she will keep me up to speed. So the article in landscape management was incomplete. It said the bill has passed the senate leading you to believe it was a done deal.

ArizPestWeed
02-28-2006, 12:04 AM
http://www.azleg.state.az.us/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=1221&image.x=24&image.y=13

A friend in the weed control business gave this to me yesterday .

ArizPestWeed
02-28-2006, 12:20 AM
That's a violation of Fed. law (FIFRA). I doubt it will stand.
That's like saying , all the homes owners who buy & use insecticides are in violation

Grassmechanic
02-28-2006, 10:00 AM
That's like saying , all the homes owners who buy & use insecticides are in violation
Listen, I believe in states rights to the end, but as long as wind blows from one state to another, and rivers, creeks and other bodies of water flow across state lines, There is NO way a state can come up with it's own version of laws that will trump the federal law. And yes, I'd like to see restrictions on some of the chemicals that homeowners can apply.

ArizPestWeed
03-01-2006, 10:36 PM
Here 's this thread