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sundancerz
02-27-2006, 06:11 PM
Can low voltage lighting be connected in series or does it have to be connect in parallel? I'm thinking wiring in series....that the bulbs (7 watt) won't be big enough to pass enough power to work the rest of the lights correctly. Just wondering if anyone has ever tried it.(wiring in series that is)
Thanks

Splicer
02-27-2006, 06:27 PM
Yes you wire low voltage lighting in series. If you didn't you would blow all the 7 watt bulbswith the 24watt transformer not to mention all the additional wiring.:drinkup:

sundancerz
02-27-2006, 07:56 PM
Yes you wire low voltage lighting in series.
Thanks for the reply splicer but don't you have that backwards? The manufacturers all show low voltage hooking up in a parallel scheme which is why I wondered about wiring them in series. (I figured it would give it a constant flow)
51197
51198
I realize the examples are for speaker but it workings are the same. :)

YardPro
02-27-2006, 08:29 PM
Yes you wire low voltage lighting in series. If you didn't you would blow all the 7 watt bulbswith the 24watt transformer not to mention all the additional wiring.:drinkup:

dude... by that comment, i see that you have no understanding of how electricity works, especially low voltagelighting

Venturewest
02-27-2006, 09:23 PM
Low voltage lighting systems are designed at 12 volts. The latest UL standard wont allow transformers that produce more that 15 volts.

mgm
02-27-2006, 09:33 PM
No one really has a complete understanding of "how electricity works " I think wiring methods may be an appropriate response.

NightScenes
02-27-2006, 09:43 PM
You would not want to wire these systems in series because, if one of the lamps burns out, it would kill the rest of the circuit and therefore send too much voltage to the first lamps and cause them to blow from too much voltage. Also, with low voltage you have a large amp load. The lamps could not handle that load, you would burn out a lamp pretty quickly and then kill most, if not all of the circuit.

mgm
02-27-2006, 09:44 PM
Wire your lights using figure # 2 in the diagram.

mgm
02-27-2006, 09:48 PM
If you wired the circuit in series and one lamp burned out - the circuit can not provide power to any other light - the path will be incomplete. If that happened the rest of the lamps will not light - no harm done.

Pro-Scapes
02-27-2006, 10:24 PM
isnt that called Series parralell. Definatly dont just string them along as paul stated or you will have the christmas lights syndrom Along with many other problems as he stated.

I really like the hub meathod of wiring. As to the guy that said you would blow a 7 watt bulb with a 24 watt trans ?????? where you getting 24 watt transformers. The bulb if its 7 watts will draw just that. Its not like a speaker with an amplifier which the amp has a variable output as volume increases or decreases. I dont like the speaker schematic. Try looking up one at Cast-lighting.com Its all good just either wire it to a hub or wire it like Paul said.

Splicer
02-27-2006, 10:25 PM
Thanks for the reply splicer but don't you have that backwards? The manufacturers all show low voltage hooking up in a parallel scheme which is why I wondered about wiring them in series. (I figured it would give it a constant flow)
51197
51198
I realize the examples are for speaker but it workings are the same. :)
I stand corrected in that the voltage is 12 volts not 24, I confused it with my transformer from my garden railroad. Apologies. As for being in series yes I did reverse that as well. It is in parallel. I was pretty distracted when typing.

When I wired my Malibu low voltage lighting all that was need was to run the 12 gauge low voltage wire zip cord in the trench and each individual light just clipped to the zip wire. The lights could be spaced as close or as far as needed. That is why off the top of my head said in series, that is how it appears when in reality it is parallel. Sorry for the inconvienence and i will refrain from any more rushed posts.:drinkup:

NightScenes
02-27-2006, 10:26 PM
This is true, my bad. The lamps still could not handle the load. If you have 100 watts on a circuit you would have a load over 8 amps and the lamps could not handle the load and therefore, one would burn out pretty fast and kill the circuit.

sundancerz
02-27-2006, 10:27 PM
Thanks mgm
I knew if one burned out they would all go out, (like old xmas tree lights) but that's all I could imagine happening and was wondering if that's the only problem one would run into. I believe you answered my question. (it will work either way)
The up side is you only have to connect 2 wires together rather than 3 when connecting parallel. I just thought it was funny that it's not mentioned anywhere. Running it as the mfg. states (parallel) puts a constant current on the feed wire , putting it in series the current needs to go through each filament before going to the next light...that's where I thought a problem might raise it's ugly head (the filaments are definitely not 12 or 14 gage) I'm not sure if there's enough current to light the rest of them so they all have the same brightness.
Thanks
wiring 101 is concluded. :) :)

mgm
02-27-2006, 10:29 PM
Nightscapespaul- great web site ! I have a question about your low voltage systems- are you using any electronic solid state low voltage transformers ?
I have been using them in limited applications in my landscape and indoor systems for about 5 years - The brand I use is WAC -max wattage is only 150watts , the only draw back is electrical noise on the 120 volt system - hence my use is limited. I have not found any one in our area using them except in commercial lighting .

NightScenes
02-27-2006, 10:35 PM
MGM, thank you for your comments on my site. I use the Kichler Pro Series transformers. I know about the WAC transformers that you are talking about but I can't see a real use for them in my applications.