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True Harbor
03-07-2006, 09:56 PM
can you put this down in florida without being certified. This lawn has a lot of weeds and would like to improve it. thanks for the help

Lizard Lawn Care
03-07-2006, 10:10 PM
This is a sore subject with me....... No you can not put down scotts weed and feed..... you can put down "fertilizer" but you can not put down any weed killer...... (this includes round up) If you are a home owner with absoutly no knowledge of herbacides.... you can put down anything at home depot.... but as a lawn pro....... only fert....

True Harbor
03-07-2006, 11:06 PM
do people actually check if you have reg fert or weed and feed in your spreader?

lawnmaniac883
03-07-2006, 11:08 PM
Well, no but as far as being "legal" you must be a certified applicator to apply an herbicide for pay...

Necroshine
03-07-2006, 11:12 PM
Its best to probably not get caught ! I was talking to a lady who came in and bought some Round Up Pro from me the othernight , and started chatting about the work and whatnot. I asked her how long it took and where'd you go for your Round Up Liscense so, I could get a helpful hand with mine. She said she didn't have one and took off right quick.

lawnmaniac883
03-07-2006, 11:20 PM
Thats right! Just dont get caught! After all only ~ 20% of the florida lco's actually have their certified applicator license anyway. Why not be like all the other bums out there? (no offense of course)

True Harbor
03-07-2006, 11:46 PM
Its crazy though you have to work for someone else for 3 years. I think some sort of training course would work out better I just got into the lawn business cause I like working for myself. Can anyone tell me the steps I need to take to get my limited applicator license in florida. Thanks

daveintoledo
03-08-2006, 09:34 AM
if you were my competition, not certified, which is publuc knowledge on the web....,.... id turn you in, and get rid of you fast..... so sub it out, of get leget//////

.....its not worth the fines man.....

tjgray
03-08-2006, 05:01 PM
Its crazy though you have to work for someone else for 3 years. I think some sort of training course would work out better I just got into the lawn business cause I like working for myself.

I don't see 3 years as crazy... I see it as a minimum. My husband worked for other companies for 10 years before we decided to jump out on our own.

No chemical applications are not rocket science and well maybe it shouldn't take a person 10 years before they make the leap but it does require knowledge and skill that just can't be learned from some sort of training course....there is just so much more to it than you may realize :waving:

greenscapeman
03-08-2006, 05:05 PM
Is this something that is required in every state? I have yet to find an LCO in KY that has any herbicide certification.

rodneyskip
03-08-2006, 05:33 PM
Great Question! We are moving to KY at the end of this month and are trying to find info about KY requirements for herbicide certification. Anyone know where to look?

FSully
03-08-2006, 05:45 PM
http://www.kyagr.com/enviro_out/pesticide/index.htm

rodneyskip
03-08-2006, 07:01 PM
Thanks FSUlly- But I must be missing it- all I can find is info about pesticide license- not herbicide.

It's probably right there under my nose- anyone else having the same problem?

FSully
03-08-2006, 07:09 PM
http://www.uky.edu/Ag/PAT/newcat.htm

look at Cat 3


Herbicides are pesticides

True Harbor
03-08-2006, 09:07 PM
ok I understand but it does seem weird as some people say that the homeowner can do it himself but the lawn service can't. If it were that huge of a deal they shouldnt be able to do it either without working for someone else for 3 years plus passing test. Anyways I haven't applied any yet to peoples lawns and thats why i was asking.

tjgray
03-08-2006, 10:14 PM
ok I understand but it does seem weird as some people say that the homeowner can do it himself but the lawn service can't. If it were that huge of a deal they shouldnt be able to do it either without working for someone else for 3 years plus passing test. Anyways I haven't applied any yet to peoples lawns and thats why i was asking.

I don't think there is one person here that doesn't wish more retrictions were put on homeowners regarding chemical application.....*well there maybe a few but I doubt very much*

It does seem one sided or unfair that a homeowner has little to no retrictions while the professionals seem to have so many.....but since when has things always been fair???

Fair or not it is the law and as a professional in this industry I respect its laws and regulations enough to comply with them.

If ya'll don't already....May I suggest you start reading the Pesticide, Herbicide & Fertilizer Application section *read I said read:)* a person can learn a lot from doing just that but it doesn't and should not take the place of formal training preferably in the field.

When I wrote that there was a whole lot more to it then one may realize I had this thread in mind http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=134487

parkeeee
03-08-2006, 11:12 PM
In Wisconsin you must pass a written test for certification as a Commercial Pesticide Applicator. There are no provisions as to how many years you have worked in the field.

Mr. Vern
03-08-2006, 11:30 PM
Here's my $.02. In my mind certifications and licenses are one and the same as insurance. They do absolutely nothing to increase your knowledge or skill, they just give you the peace of mind to sleep well at night knowing that the Gestapo will not be knocking on your door and trying to shut your busines (i.e. livelihood) down. It's just simply insurance against that concern. Having said that I have chosen to get my contractor's license and am 100% in compliance with all of the costly regulations I know about. I do not have the pesticide license so I just tell the customer that they will save a bunch if they apply the Roundup prior to my crews arriving to work. If they ever ask to have me do it (it's never happened) I have a good friend who specializes in chemical applications and I will just sub it out to him, mark it up 20% and pass the cost to the customer. I only do installs and no maintenance, so if I were doing maintenance I would almost have to get the license due to the impractability(not sure that one's in the dictionary) of subbing that much out. Bottom line is what your tolerance for risk is and what worries you want to allow to consume your thoughts. - Just my $.02

True Harbor
03-08-2006, 11:52 PM
I want to follow all rules regs etc. I just believe there should be some sort of training course/test even if its extensive to be allowed to apply homeowner grade pesticides without them having to buy it. The three years should be discontinued unless your going to be a full PCO.

daveintoledo
03-09-2006, 12:01 AM
I want to follow all rules regs etc. I just believe there should be some sort of training course/test even if its extensive to be allowed to apply homeowner grade pesticides without them having to buy it. The three years should be discontinued unless your going to be a full PCO.

some states, including Ohio, you get the study guide, you pay for the materials and test... if you pass you pay for your license, and you go apply.... no waiting period

all depends on where you at....

only reason i mentioned that its not worth it earlier, is because some members may have suggested its OK to break this law, just dont get caught... and i was just disagreeing with them on that point... if in fact that is what was ment and i didnt misinterpret the post...

True Harbor
03-09-2006, 12:11 AM
I know I was talking about here in Fl it should be the same as you stated. I thought you were directing the "turn me in" at me cause I started the post. No big deal.

daveintoledo
03-09-2006, 10:01 AM
I know I was talking about here in Fl it should be the same as you stated. I thought you were directing the "turn me in" at me cause I started the post. No big deal.

man i need to communicate clearer sometimes.... im ment one of your compeditors could do it, not me..... i have heard that kind of thing goes on at a local level....your a lawnsite brother, i dont think anyone here would do that to anyone else here, know what i mean.....
:usflag:

FSully
03-09-2006, 11:51 AM
I want to follow all rules regs etc. I just believe there should be some sort of training course/test even if its extensive to be allowed to apply homeowner grade pesticides without them having to buy it. The three years should be discontinued unless your going to be a full PCO.


Welcome to Florida ;)
Your only options with out sub-contracting or hiring your own PCO.
PCO--
* You have to have 3 years working for someone else.
* Or get a degree in entomology or horticulture and work for someone for a year.
Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance
*You have to have 3 years in the landscaping business...and must show proof.