PDA

View Full Version : pricing on 19 zones


evergreenedmond
03-11-2006, 12:28 AM
I've been in lawn maintenance & Landscaping for quite a while, but I'm just getting into irrigation Ive never done a job this big I was curious what would be a good price for an irrigation system with 19 zones, the water supply is off a well with a 3 horse pump a lot of it is open with 40' heads. Only 3-4 zones will be pop up heads. I hope this helps any feed back is appreciated.

PurpHaze
03-11-2006, 12:36 AM
I'm not trying to be smarta$$ed with you but I'll tell you the same thing I tell my boss and the edukators up the food chain. I'll do a plot plan and design first and then I'll give you an estimate. But I deal with very large projects and sports fields most the time but I'm willing to bet one of the other guys will have a rough guess. I used to have by acreage guesstimates of fields versus around buildings but sometimes it would be off quite a bit due to unusual circumstances so I chucked it. :)

PurpHaze
03-11-2006, 12:40 AM
Almost forgot a very important aspect of any estimate that some guys forget whether it's an irrigation, hardscape, landscape or other related installments. A lot depends on whether you own outright the major tools/equipment to do the job, are still paying on those tools/equipment or have to rent them. This is part of your overhead and must be taken into account. :dancing:

evergreenedmond
03-11-2006, 12:43 AM
I've already got a plan together with a price that I think is good I've just never bid on an irrigation job of this size. smarta$$

evergreenedmond
03-11-2006, 12:45 AM
I own all the equipment needed. I'm not that new to this business

PurpHaze
03-11-2006, 12:54 AM
I've already got a plan together with a price that I think is good I've just never bid on an irrigation job of this size. smarta$$

Then the general response will be that only you know what your overhead is and whether or not you can make a reasonable profit based on your bid.

I own all the equipment needed. I'm not that new to this business.

Sorry... I just took you at your own word in your original post of: "but I'm just getting into irrigation Ive never done a job this big."

SprinklerGuy
03-11-2006, 01:02 AM
Your price will be :

Parts cost + Overhead costs + intended profit = total price

As purp said..only you know what it costs you to be in business each day....and how much you want to put in your pocket.

I'm guessing you are looking for help in how long it will take so you can arrive at a number.....there again, it may take you longer or not as long as the rest of us, so only you can know this number.

I like to break it into pieces....how much of each piece can I do in a day.

Hope that helps, but truly, you can only know how long it will take by going out and doing a few of these bigger ones....keep this in mind....a 19 zone system is (4) 5 zone systems....but with one breaker and one timer.

jerryrwm
03-11-2006, 01:08 AM
depending on your costs and what the market will bear, it could be anywhere from $6000 to $19000. There is not enough information given to even hazard an educated guess.

bidding a system by zones is not a very safe way to bid any kind of installation without any kind of history to give you a base unit price.

Ground Master
03-11-2006, 03:15 PM
The real key is going to be - how long will this job take you to complete? Like sprinklerguy said break it up into portions that you can get done in 1 day.

Flow Control
03-11-2006, 03:21 PM
The real key is going to be - how long will this job take you to complete? Like sprinklerguy said break it up into portions that you can get done in 1 day.

On that note how many guys can have a 4-5 man crew wrap up the entire system in a day? Given nice weather.

JeffY
03-11-2006, 03:47 PM
On that note how many guys can have a 4-5 man crew wrap up the entire system in a day? Given nice weather.


There's a lot of variables depending on size of the yard and backflow. We put in a system at two houses next door to each other, each had seperate back flows and controllers. With 5 guys, we completed in 50 hours, including 5 hours of drive time. There were 62 heads installed, 1200 ft. of pipe pulled, and 11 zones installed, 4 for one house and 7 for the other. These were very small lots so of the 62 heads, 12 were PGJs due to the size of the front yard and only 8 gpm available. Of the 5 guys there, only 1 (me) has significant experience, 2 had moderate experience, and 2 had never done it before. So I was constantly checking up on them, installing the controllers, installing the valves, raking the lines, etc. So it was a busy 10 hours for me.

I'm sure if I had an experienced crew, I would have been much lower on time. You take some good with the bad when you have a large amount of peole on site. I typically have only 2 other crew members on site when I'm doing a sprinkler install. The average time is around 30 hours.

absolutelawnman
03-11-2006, 10:56 PM
Let me guess you bid the job and got into it and then realized that you are losing money, or not going to make as much as you thought so you come on here hoping that someone will feel sorry for you and you can sleep at night.

Or maybe you were too cold to do the proper measuring and you bid a 15 zone job and ended up doing a 19 zone system.

Flow Control
03-12-2006, 09:56 AM
Let me guess you bid the job and got into it and then realized that you are losing money, or not going to make as much as you thought so you come on here hoping that someone will feel sorry for you and you can sleep at night.

Or maybe you were too cold to do the proper measuring and you bid a 15 zone job and ended up doing a 19 zone system.

Who is this directed to?

jerryrwm
03-12-2006, 10:22 AM
Who is this directed to?

Actually if you look at their locations, they are both from the Edmond, OK area. Sounds like they may have crossed paths or swords in the past. Because Absolute was making a lot of assumptions and guesses that suggest a prior relationship. Just my guess. I could be wrong.

PurpHaze
03-12-2006, 10:32 AM
Actually if you look at their locations, they are both from the Edmond, OK area. Sounds like they may have crossed paths or swords in the past. Because Absolute was making a lot of assumptions and guesses that suggest a prior relationship. Just my guess. I could be wrong.

Or one lost the bid to the other one?

Flow Control
03-12-2006, 12:13 PM
If any of that might be the truth then you have to admit it is funny:laugh: :laugh:

HBFOXJr
03-13-2006, 10:54 AM
material + all labor costs incl all ins, taxes, etc (labor burden) + equipment costs + over head + profit = Your bid

PurpHaze
03-13-2006, 11:35 AM
If any of that might be the truth then you have to admit it is funny:laugh: :laugh:

Or even maybe one guy stole the other guy's sweetie??? :hammerhead:

evergreenedmond
03-13-2006, 05:14 PM
Hey absolutelawnman tell your wife I said happy birthday

jimmyburg
03-13-2006, 10:29 PM
jerryrwm what is a nat'l cert backflow tester? I have been a tester for 6 years and never heard of one, also im a lic irrigator LI8675 and now working for the City of Fort Worth as a Backflow and Cross Connection Inspector.

BlakeReeder
03-13-2006, 11:21 PM
Personally I have had great luck with bidding by the Sq. Ft. To me this suites my market and from experience a word of mouth know about what to bid a job per ft. It seems to me that it is hard to know just exactly what you may run into or exacly how many valves are going to be used. Bidding by the ft. takes all the guess work out of it

jerryrwm
03-14-2006, 01:09 AM
jerryrwm what is a nat'l cert backflow tester? I have been a tester for 6 years and never heard of one, also im a lic irrigator LI8675 and now working for the City of Fort Worth as a Backflow and Cross Connection Inspector.

In addition to the Texas exam, I also took the ABPA National Certification exam. This is recognized nation-wide. I will have to register with any other states and pay their state licensing fees, and not have to sit for another exam in each state. The course, and CEU requirements are the same as you took, I basically paid another $125.00 for the National Certification.

drmiller100
03-25-2006, 02:36 PM
100 bucks a head for big heads, 75 for sprays.

add 1000 bucks becuase it is a well, and customers always lie about how much water they have. Subtract 250 if dedicated irrigation well that does not require backflow. Add another 1000 bucks if filtration is required beyond the 2 quart 100 mesh filters all wells get.

I'll discount up to 40 percent if payment is great and the job is big enough and soil is easy enough.

drmiller100
03-25-2006, 02:42 PM
btw, a 3 horse well with 19 zones is going to be about 9 acres. a 3 horse well is a LOT of water.

Flow Control
03-25-2006, 08:40 PM
Personally I have had great luck with bidding by the Sq. Ft. To me this suites my market and from experience a word of mouth know about what to bid a job per ft. It seems to me that it is hard to know just exactly what you may run into or exacly how many valves are going to be used. Bidding by the ft. takes all the guess work out of it

LCO's ask me for a price based on SQ Ft all the time. How do you bid it? When they tell my X amount of sq ft it means S@#$% to me. I can water a large wide open are easily and small irregular areas get pricey. What is your formula?