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one man gang
03-12-2006, 01:13 PM
I keep telling myself not to give quotes with so much time before cutting cause the people(tire kickers) are hell bent on getting a bunch of quotes and using them for leverage. I've done 3 for people using the local low-baller(a mid sized co. with 3 crews who's employees all look like they just left a meth lab) but hate his work then decide to give him another chance when they find out the going rate. One was from a million dollar gated hood.I did pick up one in the winter but I was the only one to return their call. How do you guys close when your the first one to show and the people want to get more quotes? I get almost all my work after the grass starts growing but I still can't resist doing these early bird quotes even though I know it's a waste of time. Being first is the way to go when the grass is growing but before the season it seems to be a major disadvantage. I also realize that the low-ballers help us all by taking the pita's and make us look good with our quality but I hate proving to people how cheap they're getting it for. Thanks in advance for any help.

Ramairfreak98ss
03-12-2006, 01:21 PM
i dont get THAT many that call, i can kind of sort them out, if theyre not to be bias, but mostly ANY decent other than blacks or white folk, theyre probably a waste of time, indian descents especially cut down everything, so if youd normally charge $40 for a lawn, and tell them $35 like i used to just to GET their business knowing theyre cheap, and then they say $20 or $25, lol. Just tell them twice as much like oh its $60 per lawn cut, they say how about 35$, i say $40 and they say, OK, they feel like they won lol.

I get most calls first week in april or last few days in march if its warm in NJ>

one man gang
03-13-2006, 10:36 AM
i dont get THAT many that call, i can kind of sort them out, if theyre not to be bias, but mostly ANY decent other than blacks or white folk, theyre probably a waste of time, indian descents especially cut down everything, so if youd normally charge $40 for a lawn, and tell them $35 like i used to just to GET their business knowing theyre cheap, and then they say $20 or $25, lol. Just tell them twice as much like oh its $60 per lawn cut, they say how about 35$, i say $40 and they say, OK, they feel like they won lol.

I get most calls first week in april or last few days in march if its warm in NJ>

I see, interesting.

Splicer
03-13-2006, 10:58 AM
i dont get THAT many that call, i can kind of sort them out, if theyre not to be bias, but mostly ANY decent other than blacks or white folk, theyre probably a waste of time, indian descents especially cut down everything, so if youd normally charge $40 for a lawn, and tell them $35 like i used to just to GET their business knowing theyre cheap, and then they say $20 or $25, lol. Just tell them twice as much like oh its $60 per lawn cut, they say how about 35$, i say $40 and they say, OK, they feel like they won lol.

I get most calls first week in april or last few days in march if its warm in NJ>
Thats just using the ol' gray matter!:laugh: :clapping: :usflag:

JimLewis
03-14-2006, 04:08 AM
....... How do you guys close when your the first one to show and the people want to get more quotes? .....

Well, there is a lot that goes into this. This is a fairly complex issue.

First, I don't ever worry about people who are looking for the lowest price. I am not going to win that game because I know I am nowhere near the cheapest LCO around here. So people who are just looking to compare prices aren't really who I am after. So I just give the bid and move on. I don't even worry about them. I understand it's just a numbers game and I may not land that one, but I'll probably land the next one. So I guess the first rule is don't try to compete in the "lowest price" market. Ignore those customers. Leave them for the other LCOs. You can't have the entire market. So figure out which segment of the market you want and go for that one.

Second, when a customer is looking more at value, professionalism, service, quality, reliability, etc. than price, I am more than prepared. In that arena, I rule. So I come prepared. My service is more comprehensive than most of my competitors. My vehicles, uniforms, employees, bid forms, business cards, etc. look sharper than most of my competitors. My experience is more than most of my competitors. The reference list I hand out with every bid is 2 pages long and has 75+ references they can call. My competitors leave no references, usually. Our teams are 100% reliable. They show up every single week - ON TIME. etc. etc. etc. So I come prepared to demonstrate to my potential customer that we mean business and if they want quality, they'll hire us.

Third, I understand it's just a numbers game. So I am constantly doing more marketing than I need to. I always have more calls coming in than I need. I set up multiple forms of advertising to assure that I get a constant barrage of calls coming in from potential new customers. This is key because when you got tons of calls coming in, your whole posture toward customers changes. No single potential customer is really all that key to your success. If they say no, or say you're too expensive or whatever, you can just walk away without any regrets whatsoever because you know you'll be giving another 10 bids for maintenance that week. And you know that several of them will say yes. You understand it's just a numbers game and it doesn't matter which ones say no. It only matters which ones say yes!

Fourth, I am confident. I am confident they'll be happier with our company. I am confident in our company's reputation, reliability, etc. Not cocky. There's a big difference. But confident to the point where customers get that you are not desperate. They get that you have a good, solid, respectable business and they sense that they should maybe jump on board.

Those are just a few things I thought of at this late hour. Hope that helps.

one man gang
03-14-2006, 11:05 AM
Well, there is a lot that goes into this. This is a fairly complex issue.

First, I don't ever worry about people who are looking for the lowest price. I am not going to win that game because I know I am nowhere near the cheapest LCO around here. So people who are just looking to compare prices aren't really who I am after. So I just give the bid and move on. I don't even worry about them. I understand it's just a numbers game and I may not land that one, but I'll probably land the next one. So I guess the first rule is don't try to compete in the "lowest price" market. Ignore those customers. Leave them for the other LCOs. You can't have the entire market. So figure out which segment of the market you want and go for that one.

Second, when a customer is looking more at value, professionalism, service, quality, reliability, etc. than price, I am more than prepared. In that arena, I rule. So I come prepared. My service is more comprehensive than most of my competitors. My vehicles, uniforms, employees, bid forms, business cards, etc. look sharper than most of my competitors. My experience is more than most of my competitors. The reference list I hand out with every bid is 2 pages long and has 75+ references they can call. My competitors leave no references, usually. Our teams are 100% reliable. They show up every single week - ON TIME. etc. etc. etc. So I come prepared to demonstrate to my potential customer that we mean business and if they want quality, they'll hire us.

Third, I understand it's just a numbers game. So I am constantly doing more marketing than I need to. I always have more calls coming in than I need. I set up multiple forms of advertising to assure that I get a constant barrage of calls coming in from potential new customers. This is key because when you got tons of calls coming in, your whole posture toward customers changes. No single potential customer is really all that key to your success. If they say no, or say you're too expensive or whatever, you can just walk away without any regrets whatsoever because you know you'll be giving another 10 bids for maintenance that week. And you know that several of them will say yes. You understand it's just a numbers game and it doesn't matter which ones say no. It only matters which ones say yes!

Fourth, I am confident. I am confident they'll be happier with our company. I am confident in our company's reputation, reliability, etc. Not cocky. There's a big difference. But confident to the point where customers get that you are not desperate. They get that you have a good, solid, respectable business and they sense that they should maybe jump on board.

Those are just a few things I thought of at this late hour. Hope that helps.


Very much, thanks for taking the time to reply. Also, how many and what forms of advertising are you doing?

JimLewis
03-14-2006, 11:34 AM
Very much, thanks for taking the time to reply. Also, how many and what forms of advertising are you doing?

That's something to discuss on Instant Messenger or in a P.M. I don't discuss that publicly anymore. :)

one man gang
03-14-2006, 11:39 AM
That's something to discuss on Instant Messenger or in a P.M. I don't discuss that publicly anymore. :)


I totally understand, can you send it to my lawnsite P.M.?
Thanks