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View Full Version : 00 f-150 150-K how much farther will it go?


Az Gardener
03-19-2006, 04:43 PM
This has been the best truck. I have had 0 repairs to the engine or maintenance for that matter only thing I have done is change brake pads, occasionally oil, tires, and actuators for the locks and windows. The kicker is I have a natural gas kit on it so I can run CNG or regular and that allows me to buy cheaper CNG 1.85 now. Problem is the pump is not close and I don't use it much. I also get to license the truck for 15$ a year. Newer truck will cost me 400.00 or so to license. I can't imagine this truck will go much further without some significant repairs. I am trying to decide buy newer 04-05 or just dump the $$$ do repairs as they arise and drive this another 150 or so. If the paint and body were great on this truck it would be a no brainer, but even if I do the mechanical work that I'm sure is coming The truck still has lots of scratches and a few small dents. Am I looking at more in repairs than the thing is worth?

bobcat9957
03-19-2006, 04:53 PM
depends how many miles are on it now and how hard it been driven :dizzy:

Az Gardener
03-19-2006, 05:02 PM
Its just over 150-K miles and its been in the business 4 years sales/supply 2 years in the field pulling a 12"enclosed trailer and hauling clippings and trimmings. It has been very poorly maintained, oil changes every 6-10-K miles all city driving. Now I am using it again for sales and supply, plants and flowers only.

Jpocket
03-19-2006, 05:56 PM
Why not just dump it and buy another, sounds like there is nothing that special about it, other than it doing what it is supposed to do. Just start the cycle over again. get an 05' and keep it for 4 or 5 years.

HenryB
03-19-2006, 06:15 PM
Most people around here lease the F150's for two years (80k miles) and they've usually already had their share of problems. I'd say you've done really well with that truck.

lawnmaniac883
03-19-2006, 08:23 PM
Get rid of it...oil changes every 6000-10000 miles, are you insane? There is no way an engine maintained so poorly will last much longer for you. Dont expect anything on resale/trade in value. Either buy a new truck or a used diesel. Just my 2cents

Az Gardener
03-20-2006, 11:11 AM
I wanted to give this a a bump and I just can't believe in 150-K of in town start and stop, in one nursery to another to jobsites. 115 degree weather I havent replaced anything! No starter, no waterpump, no alternater I dont think I have even changed the transmission fluid? The karma works baby.

CutRight
03-20-2006, 05:45 PM
im surprised nobody has come in here and just said it lasted so long cause its a ford. where are the ford guys.

If the truck is still running fine and it costs you almost nothing to keep it around. you might as well just keep it and run it into the ground, just dont rely on it, but also buy another one. You will get nothing for resale, its probably more valuable to you to keep it.

Im a GM guy myself.

start2finish
03-20-2006, 07:28 PM
i would have the truck painted and spend the money you would have spent on a truck somewhere else. Can you think of some equipment you need? let your money make you more money. That old truck will do the same thing a brand new one will do, they all will break down as long it is consistently reliable that is what counts.

Smalltimer1
03-20-2006, 08:06 PM
im surprised nobody has come in here and just said it lasted so long cause its a ford. where are the ford guys.

If the truck is still running fine and it costs you almost nothing to keep it around. you might as well just keep it and run it into the ground, just dont rely on it, but also buy another one. You will get nothing for resale, its probably more valuable to you to keep it.

Im a GM guy myself.

Any truck would be lucky to make it that long with the kind of treatment he's described.

Personally if it runs good and nothing's wrong with it, take it on up to 200k and sell out. Some kid will come around needing a cheap truck and will gladly give you $2500 to get you out of it. 200k seems to be the magic number for most gas engines anyway.

Smalltimer1
03-20-2006, 08:24 PM
Forgot to add: if you keep it, it may be wise to go ahead and do the head gaskets, timing chain set, and while you're in there mic the bores to see how they're doing.

Az Gardener
03-20-2006, 08:44 PM
Thats the type of info I have been looking for. I don't like to be stranded on the side of the road and I wouldn't mind dropping 3-5K all at once if it buys me another 70-100K miles. I,m just not sure whether I should just take it in and say change all this or wait for things to happen. I have to think using the CNG helped, 30-40-K of the miles were on CNG. I used to use it much more. It needs actuators and brakes again now.

Smalltimer1
03-20-2006, 09:55 PM
Thats the type of info I have been looking for. I don't like to be stranded on the side of the road and I wouldn't mind dropping 3-5K all at once if it buys me another 70-100K miles. I,m just not sure whether I should just take it in and say change all this or wait for things to happen. I have to think using the CNG helped, 30-40-K of the miles were on CNG. I used to use it much more. It needs actuators and brakes again now.


By all means, do it now. Peace of mind and Piece of mind are worth a lot. You'll have the security if you will, that at least the head gaskets won't let go, and that your timing chain set won't let go either and leave you stranded somewhere you don't want to be, i.e. the rough side of town, etc. Also have the water pump examined while you're in there.

Dirty Water
03-21-2006, 12:07 AM
By all means, do it now. Peace of mind and Piece of mind are worth a lot. You'll have the security if you will, that at least the head gaskets won't let go, and that your timing chain set won't let go either and leave you stranded somewhere you don't want to be, i.e. the rough side of town, etc. Also have the water pump examined while you're in there.

There is absolutely no reasion to have the headgaskets replaced before failure. None.

The only reasion a headgasket fails is from extreme heat causing warpage of the head or the block, or extreme cylinder pressures (Which is not an issue since your truck is naturally asperated)

Changing the headgasket before it fails will not prolong the life of the engine, if the engine gets hot because the water pump siezed then a brand new headgasket will fail just as quickly as one with 200,000 miles.

Smalltimer1
03-21-2006, 01:04 AM
There is absolutely no reasion to have the headgaskets replaced before failure. None.

The only reasion a headgasket fails is from extreme heat causing warpage of the head or the block, or extreme cylinder pressures (Which is not an issue since your truck is naturally asperated)

Changing the headgasket before it fails will not prolong the life of the engine, if the engine gets hot because the water pump siezed then a brand new headgasket will fail just as quickly as one with 200,000 miles.

Head gaskets do exhibit wear though from normal heating/cooling cycles, though it is not as evident as other parts. One side is exposed to extreme heat most of the time, and the other is not neccessarily extreme cold, but still a major difference in temperature. Yes, the head gaskets do not have an appreciable effect on the overall life of the engine, but they are key in protecting your investment and its performance.

When pop had his truck's valves done at 105k he had new HG's put in because the original ones looked like they were about to go, i.e. the sidewall thickness was thinner than what it was supposed to look like and the water pump was fine. I can prove this with a regular old Briggs head gasket. It's common sense to replace what is there (wear items such as HG's) while you're already in there unless you just like tearing down motors as a hobby.

And being it's an F-150, if it has a 4.6 or 5.4 mod motor in it, the timing chains have to be taken off anyway to do the HG's so why not do those while you're in there as well. Timing chains stretch over time and can eventually break.

If its just a 4.2 V6 then its done just like a conventional pushrod engine.

With all this being said, I am sort of a Preventive Maintenance guru anyway. I change my oil as close to the interval as possible, drain the water separator once a month, keep an eye on the filters and fluids, and make sure everything is working correctly, whether it be my pickup or my equipment. If something internal goes wrong while I'm in there I replace anything that looks suspect and anything that will be a PITA to get to later on. I'd rather head off a potential problem before it starts than to let it put me out of work for whatever length of time, waiting on parts, and doing the work, etc.

lpwhandyman
03-21-2006, 01:19 AM
It's funny you bring up this topic as I'm discussing it right now with the little woman. I would keep on running it until you start having problems with it. I am not a big fan of a brand new vehicle for work, but every year when I do my taxes and see how much I spend on repairs of an older vehicle, I could be driving a newer one and I'll probably break down soon and get a diesel with a couple years under its belt. But I hate the thought of those monthly checks wrote out for a vehicle. I haven't done that since right out of high school (87).

Dirty Water
03-21-2006, 01:33 AM
Smalltimer, show me a engine that requires you to pull head heads to change the timing chain and I'll agree with replacing the head gaskets at the same time.

Smalltimer1
03-21-2006, 10:22 AM
Smalltimer, show me a engine that requires you to pull head heads to change the timing chain and I'll agree with replacing the head gaskets at the same time.


The Ford mod motors (4.6/5.4) are OHC so the timing chains have to be taken off to remove the heads, whether you do it by taking the sprockets off or moving the head around (after removing the studs) to get some slack is up to you. You must be thinking of the valve cover gasket or thinking that they are pushrod engines. I worked at the local dealer 2 years ago over the summer and it was pretty obvious. I had to do a set of 4.6 HG's myself, and yes that truck is still running fine :waving: . A 4.2 V6 you don't have to touch the heads to do the timing set since it is a conventional pushrod engine.

Here's a cutaway view of the Mustang 4.6 DOHC, couldn't find one of the Triton 4.6, proving that the timing chains do have to be removed (in one way or another) or at least that the end sprockets on the heads have to be taken off (meaning the chain has to come off as well), therefore justifying the effort to go ahead and do the HG's while doing the timing chains. Of course I am going on the idea that he would be doing the work himself and not paying someone else to do it. I understand the idea of not wanting to pay more than you have to for someone's time, but I also understand the concept of preventive maintenance and being prepared.

Smalltimer1
03-21-2006, 10:27 AM
I just found some cutaway pics of the 5.4 further proving what I said.

Dirty Water
03-21-2006, 11:42 AM
Dude, you pull the sprockets to change the chains on OHC engines, it takes literally 2 seconds with the right tools.

You don't pull the head :laugh: If you pull the head to get slack on the chain thats like removing the engine so you can reach the rear spark plugs. :laugh:

I've been working on OHC engines forever.

Smalltimer1
03-21-2006, 12:56 PM
Dude, you pull the sprockets to change the chains on OHC engines, it takes literally 2 seconds with the right tools.

You don't pull the head :laugh: If you pull the head to get slack on the chain thats like removing the engine so you can reach the rear spark plugs. :laugh:

I've been working on OHC engines forever.


Well when you're working for a 50 year old dealership that is as tight as they are you do what you have to do, and they did not have the fancy tools that a lot of the other dealers have. Actually the tools they do have belong to the mechanics other than the lifts and the diagnostic equipment. But it wasn't that much trouble to get the head off anyway. I did what I was told to do (supervised by a tech with 40+ years experience), and got the truck back on the road.

lawnmaniac883
03-21-2006, 09:27 PM
Seems to me that you guys have each other misinterpreted. Small timer is talkin about pullin the heads to replace the timing chain, dirty water is talkin about havin to pull the timing chain to replace head gasket...correct me if I am wrong.

That said, I agree that there is no reason to replace head gaskets before they fail. If sidewall thickness had anything to do with wear, then there would be blowby and the head would be lifted under moderate to high throttle usage but what do I know :hammerhead: