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JRSlawn
03-23-2006, 03:46 PM
Who here does hand drawn designs. I see everyone into these programs. I am starting to get away from the computer and into the hand drawn velum designs. I was wanting to get some other peoples opinion.

cgland
03-23-2006, 04:13 PM
We do both. It depends on the customers expectations and the size of the project.

Chris

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
03-23-2006, 04:16 PM
Primarily hand drawn designs here.payup

PlantSolutions
03-23-2006, 04:49 PM
I have done hand drawn designs, but I want to save time using computer generated.

get rich
03-23-2006, 04:56 PM
I also am interrested in doing designs and wondered about the rubber stamp kit advertised in the back of some landscape magazines. Anyone ever use those stamp kits? Isimply connot afford some of the software out there and have yet to hear good reviews on some of the less expensive programs...hell if i am gonna spend 1000 dollars on anything, it'll be a trip to the bahamas. lol
Any thoughts?

drsogr
03-23-2006, 05:13 PM
I also am interrested in doing designs and wondered about the rubber stamp kit advertised in the back of some landscape magazines. Anyone ever use those stamp kits? Isimply connot afford some of the software out there and have yet to hear good reviews on some of the less expensive programs...hell if i am gonna spend 1000 dollars on anything, it'll be a trip to the bahamas. lol
Any thoughts?

I use only Autocad. Why would you want to do hand drawn designs....isn't it less effecient? I am always impressed when I see hand drawn...but if I was a customer and had to pay that much more for a hand drawn design...I would prefer the computerized version.

get rich
03-23-2006, 09:55 PM
I really don't spend all that much time with stencils, most of the time is spent doing the measuring of the house and planting areas. So i guess my drawings wouldn't impress you as much. When you use autocad do you use a plotter printer for actuall blueprint size plans? I'll look more into my designs after spring rush slows down. Although i am still curious about those stamp kits for 100 dollars, could be quick and easy, still looking professional. Hope spring goes off without any hitchs for everyone...good luck.:drinkup:

Grn Mtn
03-23-2006, 10:20 PM
Hand draw to scale with computer printouts of the plants if paid, good looking chicken scratch if I'm not being paid.

Ramairfreak98ss
03-23-2006, 11:53 PM
some plans i have autocad plots done, any plant pictures etc are hand drawn in the areas by the horticulturist i work with. FULL out computer designs or 3d i dont do, if they requested it i would not do FREE estimates since that takes up A LOT of my measuring time, software costs, design costs etc only for the customer to use another company without the costs of this software/labor or take my plans and do it themselves.

Coffeecraver
03-24-2006, 05:53 AM
All my designs are by hand

:)

Dreams To Designs
03-24-2006, 08:06 AM
Much of my design work is by hand. I will use CAD for smaller projects and hardscaping to get the image of patterns on the design. I prefer hand drawn for a few reasons. My skills with CAD are improving, but not yet efficient, I have not purchased a large format printer, as most of my work is typically 18" x 24" or larger, I feel that having the entire plan in front of me on the drafting table allows a complete and overall view of the project rather than smaller pieces on a computer screen, I get a truer sense of scale with templates and positioning of materials, also hand drawn and colored pencils make a unique design that is truly yours. Many of the programs out there do a great job, and perhaps I will continue to progress with my use of Pro Landscape, but I will always print a base plan on put it on the drafting table to create my concepts.

I do love the 3D imaging as a presentation tool. The clients can get an image of what you are trying to get across to them. I find very few people, including contractors are able to understand or get the idea from a design plan. The imaging is a great help, along with an extensive use of Horticopia for plant information and pictures. Visual aids, including magazines, catalogs and additional photos to help the client understand you vision are essential. The drawing is a small part of that focus, but an essential part of the installation and completion of your design. As we have all heard, color sells. Wow them with information and photos, but create a plan that meets all the requirements in a sustainable and responsible manner. How you get to that point is no where near as important as arriving there.

As for the stamp kits, they are really tough to erase if you want to move something or happened to grab the wrong symbol. If your drawing skills are not what you want them to be, perhaps a CAD program will be the answer or sub out the actual drawing to someone that does better than you. The key in all this is design! How you get that across is important as a presentation to your client to sell your work, or the work someone else will be installing. Pick your niche. I prefer to do design work and consulting and let the talented installers translate my work into landscapes.

Kirk