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Rainman7
03-23-2006, 06:40 PM
I came across 3 Hunter Pro-C clocks today that have bad displays and a manufacturers date of Mar03. Hunter has a 2 year warranty and my dist. adds 1 year shelf life. I would think I could return it any time in March. My dist. says it must be returned before March. Anybody know how that works? Anybody else having display problems with the ProC? I had a few others last year.
Its amazing that Hunter does as well as they do. PGP seals,ProC Display, SRC Dials, Coils separating....what else?

Dirty Water
03-23-2006, 10:21 PM
PGP seals?

Thats a new one. I probably see one bad wiper seal per 10 cases.

Rainman7
03-23-2006, 10:51 PM
PGP seals?

Thats a new one. I probably see one bad wiper seal per 10 cases.


Pleeaase. You must be new to the business or maybe they send all the bad heads to NY. Few years back the wiper seals were so bad that they were sending our distributors cases of them. There ability to keep out sand leaves a little to be desired. Ever take a look at the scores on the shafts after a coulple of years on the ones you replace? Look at the wiper seal on the Hunter, then compare it to the R-50 or Weathermatic T3, those are seals.

DanaMac
03-24-2006, 09:56 AM
Have to disagree Rainman. PGPs have been the most reliable heads out there. Don't get me started on the R-50, I junk those whenever possible. Been in business over 11 years now, in the industry for about 15, and PGPs here have had the best success rate. Haven't seen much seal leakage at all.

Its amazing that Hunter does as well as they do. PGP seals,ProC Display, SRC Dials, Coils separating....what else?

Can't say that I've seen any of these problems, other than the very few seals leaking.

Flatbed
03-24-2006, 01:29 PM
I have only replaced one Pro-C controller in the five years I have been installing Hunter, I can't remember replacing a PGP for a bad seal.

Wet_Boots
03-24-2006, 03:08 PM
The installers having trouble with PGPs might be working in especially sandy areas, like Long Island. If I have to use PGPs in abrasive soils, I take especial care to set the heads so the soil doesn't get a chance to chew up the seals.
At least not before my guarantee expires. :p

Rainman7
03-24-2006, 08:59 PM
The installers having trouble with PGPs might be working in especially sandy areas, like Long Island. If I have to use PGPs in abrasive soils, I take especial care to set the heads so the soil doesn't get a chance to chew up the seals.
At least not before my guarantee expires. :p


Thanks Boots, I was starting to get a complex. Could it be that weather & ground conditions here are unique as compared to anywhere else in the states?

Those Pro-C clocks I was talking about all happend to be outdoor clocks. Maybe that has something to do with it.

What about the coils? That problem makes me crazy, the inside of the coil pops out and the shell is still in the valve. Whats up with that?

Rainman7
03-24-2006, 09:02 PM
How about a reply on my original post? Oh wait, I forgot, no one else returns Hunter product because they last a lifetime.:waving:

Dirty Water
03-24-2006, 09:13 PM
Rainmain, I use RainBird DVF-100's. They used sealed solinoids with a captured plunger so you don't have to find the plunger in the valve box after it gets blasted out by water....I hate that. They also almost never need to be warranteed.

However, no manufacturer is perfect, The R-50 has a great wiper seal, too bad it stops spinning after 3 years....We have very little sand, mostly extremely rocky farm soil or very heavy clay depending on where in the county I am. So...I don't have much wiper seal failure at all, and between using RB 1800's (Greatest wiper seal on a spray imho) and the PGP's, there is very little warantee returns.

Wet_Boots
03-24-2006, 09:14 PM
I think you have to return a manufactured-in-March clock in the month of February, if it's a 36-month warranty. I haven't heard about solenoid problems with Hunter valves, being an Irritrol (Richdel) valve user. Can you elaborate? Are the SRC dial issues on the old ones, or the current SRC-plus model?

Sandy soils run along much of the Atlantic coast, and across the country, there are pockets of glacial debris, courtesy of the last ice age, that are even nastier to sprinkler heads than coastal sand.

(and on a non-abrasive water supply, with a properly-adjusted stator, the R-50s have been especially reliable. On sandy water, I wouldn't know)

Rainman7
03-25-2006, 11:06 AM
I think you have to return a manufactured-in-March clock in the month of February, if it's a 36-month warranty. I haven't heard about solenoid problems with Hunter valves, being an Irritrol (Richdel) valve user. Can you elaborate? Are the SRC dial issues on the old ones, or the current SRC-plus model?

Sandy soils run along much of the Atlantic coast, and across the country, there are pockets of glacial debris, courtesy of the last ice age, that are even nastier to sprinkler heads than coastal sand.

(and on a non-abrasive water supply, with a properly-adjusted stator, the R-50s have been especially reliable. On sandy water, I wouldn't know)

The older SRC's. Remember the dial that you would have to get in just the right position after a year or two, or to run zone x manually you would have to try all different ways of spinning the dial to RUN just to find zone 1 came on again? They improved it with the new dial that snaps into position.

I used Hunter valves for 1 season about 5 years ago. IMO they are the worst valve out there with the exception of the Hit valve from 3 years ago. Some of the coils I have had seperate from the casing and just pull out. Sometimes I open a valve box and they are laying in the dirt. Its not that bad but I probably had about 20 from the whole season. To me, the worst thing about them is the "toy" thread they use on the coils. Between the fine thread and the small diameter, its way to easy to crossthread them. Especially if they dont open on the first so called 1/4 turn. I now use the WM Silver bullet valves. I think they are the best valve out there right now. Yes, I know about the coil problem. They fixed it. The Zytel construction,S.S H.H.Bolts,Brass nutserts,manual on LEVER( no twisting coils) make it the best constructed user friendly valve to me. The Irritrol valve is my only other alt. to the WM. I just hate getting that grain of sand in the plastic bonnet. Thats my only complaint with those.

Mist heads? This year I'm trying the Hunter ProSpray heads as opposed the the SRS or 1800 I have been using in the past. Someone from this board says the Pros are far superior. We'll see.

As I stated before reguarding Rainbird. Something happend to their quality the year they started selling to H.Depot. Before that, I used them exculsively for about 10 years.

Boots, that year, Atlantic was actually sending out their counter guys to their bigger customers to change out R-50's to T-Birds(not much better) to keep them happy. Did you know that? I found that out when one of their guys changed out all of the heads on one of my jobs by mistake when they were supposed to go to a house down the block. Funny, when I called(a not so important cust.) they knew nothing of the problem.

Wet_Boots
03-25-2006, 12:12 PM
On the Weathermatic solenoids (although it's probably a dead issue by now) I was told by a WM rep that the solenoid failures were related to the hours of operation, so that in areas with really wet summers the last few years, the valves weren't quickly racking up the hours they needed to fail. The bad solenoids are supposed to all be out of warranty by now. My only possible knock on a Silver Bullet valve is that I might not want it under as high a supply pressure as I'd be confident in having a bolt-down-cover Irritrol. On one system I serviced, I remember seeing a healthy spurt of water from under the cover of one of those WM valves whenever a zone shut off. (supply pressure of 90+ psi) Those might have been the original valves, before they added some extra material to the bonnets.

PurpHaze
03-25-2006, 01:10 PM
Sandy soils run along much of the Atlantic coast, and across the country, there are pockets of glacial debris, courtesy of the last ice age, that are even nastier to sprinkler heads than coastal sand.

Here's a pic of an automatic valve (left one) that I have to replace on Monday. It's located in the skinned infield area of a multi-use (softball, LL, middle school baseball) field. There is a manually operated system to water down the skinned area for game prep and the clay/lava compound used is VERY tough on sprinklers. We've had Toro 640s, Rainbird Falcons and Hunter I-40s on this system over the past 12 years and although all of these models have stainless steel risers they still have routine problems. It's just a fact of life that if you put sprinklers into this type of environment they WILL go bad sooner than later. :hammerhead:

Dirty Water
03-25-2006, 01:52 PM
So, you can dig those boxes up exactly everytime?

PurpHaze
03-25-2006, 02:15 PM
So, you can dig those boxes up exactly everytime?

Pretty close. I have all the stuff in the area on CAD. Then I just probe for them also knowing how deep they are. I also freshen the paint on the post that gives me a good starting point.