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MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
03-23-2006, 06:30 PM
I need to identify what kind of tree this is. I have an idea of what it is, but I need to obtain opinions to know for sure. I have 2 pictures of the Overall tree shape, 2 pictures of the bark, and 2 pictures of the buds. Pleas view all pictures prior to posting your thoughts. I know its winter and there are no leaves on it, which makes it harder to ID. Thanks.

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
03-23-2006, 06:31 PM
Last picture of the buds.

all ferris
03-23-2006, 07:09 PM
Hard maple??? Cut it down and show me the butt of the tree and I'll tell you for sure.:laugh:

sheshovel
03-23-2006, 07:36 PM
Gosh I don't know Shagbark Maple?I gotta have leaves

sheshovel
03-23-2006, 07:42 PM
I am sorry..Shagbark Hickory is what I am getting from my book that's what it looks like to me
No such thing as a Shagbark Maple

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
03-23-2006, 07:44 PM
All Ferris, Thanks for the reply. It is a hazard tree, so it may come down anyway. :laugh:

Sheshovel, yeah I need leaves too to ID many trees. Buds and bark alone is hard to do. Thanks for the reply.

godzilla
03-23-2006, 08:03 PM
Mad Cap Horse.

CC Lawncare
03-23-2006, 08:33 PM
I have an idea of what it is, but I need to obtain opinions to know for sure.
I am clueless without leaves. :confused: What species do you think it is MJL? Can you let me know, once you find out for sure? I am really curious.
Thanks.:)

Coffeecraver
03-23-2006, 09:23 PM
my vote is for a sugar Maple

sheshovel
03-23-2006, 10:00 PM
Well the buds do look like one but the bark does not.

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
03-23-2006, 11:19 PM
Godzilla, Thanks for the reply. Never heard of a Mad Cap Horse before. Was wondering if that is another common name for something I already know.

CC Lawncare, My original guess was a Aceraceae Acer saccharum or sugar maple as all feris and coffeecraver have stated. However I too was stumped for a while trying to figure out exactly what it is. Sure makes it hard when there are not leaves on it. Very few can tell what a tree is by the buds and bark alone, but those few are really good at what they do. Thanks for your reply. One dead give away for a winter sugar maple ID is the stems left over from the flower clusters always hang down in groups. Problem was this tree has very little life left in it so there were no visible flower clusters in the lower branches.

Coffeecraver, thanks for your reply as well. I too feel that it is a sugar maple.

Sheshovel, I agree that the buds look like a sugar maple, but the bark does not. I think this is why I have been going crazy trying to figure it out. One thing to keep in mind is this is a very old tree. It is not healthy as its got dead dead branches, decay, and cankers. As sugar maples get older their bark begins to divide and become ridgid as they mature. Most people dont see very mature sugar maples so most associate a smoother looking bark when refering to sugar maples. I could be wrong, but this is the reasoning I have been telling myself. Thanks for your interest and replies.

PlantSolutions
03-23-2006, 11:32 PM
It's either a Maple or Horse.... It does not look like a Norway or red maple....need more info.......

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
03-23-2006, 11:39 PM
It's either a Maple or Horse.... It does not look like a Norway or red maple....need more info.......

Thanks for the reply. Your saying it might be a Horsechestnut because of the bark right?

sheshovel
03-24-2006, 12:40 AM
I am sticking to my original ID Shagbark Hickory

Coffeecraver
03-24-2006, 04:30 AM
The shagbark has a different look ,notice the long distinct platelets

http://www.oplin.org/tree/fact%20pages/hickory_shagbark/hickory_shagbark.html

:)

Coffeecraver
03-24-2006, 04:44 AM
Notice the terminal has 3 buds
sugar Maple

http://www.ashland-city.k12.oh.us/ahs/classes/hort/twig-key/opposite/sugar-maple.jpg

Dreams To Designs
03-24-2006, 07:22 AM
I believe godzilla is referring to an acronym. I use DAMP Horse. Dogwood, Ash, Maple, Phellodendron(Amur Cork) & Horse Chestnut, all being oppositely branched or budded. Looks like a maple, perhaps an old sugar maple, but not familiar with what would be common in your area. The large plates of the bark indicate something in the Acer saccharum family.

Kirk

godzilla
03-24-2006, 03:14 PM
Maple
Ash
Dogwood

CAPerfoliaceae(sp?)

HORSE chestnut

Grassmechanic
03-25-2006, 09:08 AM
It is a maple, more than likely silver maple.

alternative
03-25-2006, 10:34 AM
Looks like an Ash to me. Pictures really dont do any justice

Marco09
03-28-2006, 10:59 PM
Im pretty sure it is a sugar maple. The opposite buds. The growth of the tree is very widespread. Even though it looks farely young. there are few trees that have oppoisite buds and this is the closest one. Just a though. I have taken 2 woody plant courses recently. soo whatever I guess! haha

JimLewis
03-29-2006, 12:43 AM
There aren't any leaves on the ground anywhere nearby??? That's how I always identify trees in the winter time. Even the best landscaper doesn't usually get every single leaf. So there are usually some leaves left around the canopy of the tree somewhere. Even partially decomposed they still usually yeild serious clues.

Also, why do you need to identify this tree right now? What's the big urgency? Why not wait until it leafs out and then run it by the guys on lawnsite?

KyTurf
03-29-2006, 03:10 AM
Shagbark Hickory

jpmako
03-29-2006, 06:34 PM
MJ,

Its a Maple Tree
Post this in the arborist forum and those "tree guys" will know which variety for sure.

Jason

Gmgbo
03-29-2006, 06:50 PM
its is a sugar maple. you can tell by the buds and bark. Also most maples are fast growing, which means they have weak wood. There is a good size branch on the ground.

Onarga
04-04-2006, 02:56 PM
Ash, Maple, and Dogwood are the few trees that have opposite buds. From the broad shape I would say maple.

Onarga
04-04-2006, 02:59 PM
There aren't any leaves on the ground anywhere nearby??? That's how I always identify trees in the winter time. Even the best landscaper doesn't usually get every single leaf. So there are usually some leaves left around the canopy of the tree somewhere. Even partially decomposed they still usually yeild serious clues.


Gotta watch this cause there are usually a lot of leaves under trees that are from the neighbors trees.

JimLewis
04-04-2006, 04:24 PM
Obviously. But if I am looking under a big large tree and I see several oak leaves all over the place, and there aren't any oak leaves visible for half a block in any direction, it's pretty easy to conclude that the tree I am under is probably an oak.

AGLA
04-04-2006, 09:24 PM
Sugar Maple

Silver Maple has red twigs like a Red Maple. Sugar has those pointy looking terminal buds and that gold color twig.

There is an excellent (or was) book put out by the U of Maine at Orono. It is a winter key to trees and shrubs of Maine. It works well for most of the northern US. My first plant class was in Maine in the winter. We had to id every plant we were learning about by keying it out in the dead of winter. Later, I used to find myself tearing off leaves to look at buds in the summer to ID trees every once in a while.

It was a cheap paperback and probably could be found on line. I'll dig it out and give you the title.

ASBK
04-04-2006, 10:47 PM
Sugar Maple, just look at that dead wood on the ground. Dead give away:canadaflag:

outsideimage1
04-05-2006, 05:23 PM
looks like a white oak to me with the "scaly" bark

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-06-2006, 05:24 PM
I believe godzilla is referring to an acronym. I use DAMP Horse. Dogwood, Ash, Maple, Phellodendron(Amur Cork) & Horse Chestnut, all being oppositely branched or budded. Looks like a maple, perhaps an old sugar maple, but not familiar with what would be common in your area. The large plates of the bark indicate something in the Acer saccharum family.

Kirk

Thanks Dreams To Designs. I learn something new every day!

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-06-2006, 05:25 PM
Thanks for the replies grassmechanic, alternative, and marco09.

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-06-2006, 05:29 PM
There aren't any leaves on the ground anywhere nearby??? That's how I always identify trees in the winter time. Even the best landscaper doesn't usually get every single leaf. So there are usually some leaves left around the canopy of the tree somewhere. Even partially decomposed they still usually yeild serious clues.

Also, why do you need to identify this tree right now? What's the big urgency? Why not wait until it leafs out and then run it by the guys on lawnsite?

Thanks for the reply.

Thats the problem. There are so many other trees in the area that it would be impossible to find which leaf came from which tree. I already tried that idea.

This tree is on the campus of MSU. I needed to ID this tree for a class assignment and didnt have the option of waiting untill the buds break.

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-06-2006, 05:34 PM
Thanks for the replies KyTurf, Gmgbo, ASBK, and Onarga.

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-06-2006, 05:37 PM
MJ,

Its a Maple Tree
Post this in the arborist forum and those "tree guys" will know which variety for sure.

Jason

Thanks Jason. How's it going?

I tried it on the arborist forum and they came up with Acer saccharum, sugar maple.

That was my original guess, so hopefully its right.

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-06-2006, 05:40 PM
Sugar Maple

Silver Maple has red twigs like a Red Maple. Sugar has those pointy looking terminal buds and that gold color twig.

There is an excellent (or was) book put out by the U of Maine at Orono. It is a winter key to trees and shrubs of Maine. It works well for most of the northern US. My first plant class was in Maine in the winter. We had to id every plant we were learning about by keying it out in the dead of winter. Later, I used to find myself tearing off leaves to look at buds in the summer to ID trees every once in a while.

It was a cheap paperback and probably could be found on line. I'll dig it out and give you the title.

Thanks for the reply.

Yeah, if you could find the title of the book that would be great. Sounds like a good book and I would like to add it to my collection.

I had to take several Hort. ID classes too and I was always stuck ID'ing trees in late fall and winter as well.

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-06-2006, 05:41 PM
Thanks for the reply outsideimage1.

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-06-2006, 05:42 PM
Congrats to all who guessed Acer saccharum, or sugar maple. It indeed was a sugar maple. There is now an ID tag with a paragraph about them on the tree trunk.

all ferris
04-07-2006, 05:22 PM
look no further than the 3rd post in this thread and I told you the answer. For this I will give myself one "ata a boy" and I will break my arm patting myself on the back.

hard maple = sugar maple:clapping:

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-10-2006, 04:07 AM
look no further than the 3rd post in this thread and I told you the answer. For this I will give myself one "ata a boy" and I will break my arm patting myself on the back.

hard maple = sugar maple:clapping:

Yes all ferris you were correct :clapping:
And if it helps, I knew you had it in you:waving:

sheshovel
04-10-2006, 06:05 PM
:hammerhead: :hammerhead: :hammerhead: :hammerhead: :hammerhead: Well then I will admit I screwed up again then

MJLsLawnCareNmoreLLC
04-10-2006, 09:00 PM
:hammerhead: :hammerhead: :hammerhead: :hammerhead: :hammerhead: Well then I will admit I screwed up again then

Its ok sheshovel. Good try:clapping: :clapping: :clapping: