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thepawnshop
03-25-2006, 12:33 PM
After ordering my new mini, I realized my trailer won't carry the load...

It's a 6 ton tag along that after you deduct it's own weight will only pull ten thousand lbs. So I ordered a ten ton gooseneck to the tune of $6500...OUCH!

What REALLY stinks is the fact that I will technically be overweight for me 1 ton truck!

AARRGGHH!

Dirty Water
03-25-2006, 12:56 PM
In WA, towing more than 10k lbs needs a cdl too.

Scag48
03-25-2006, 01:18 PM
In WA, towing more than 10k lbs needs a cdl too.

I don't think that's true, I was under the impression that if you're over 26,001 combined weight you need a CDL. If not, I've never been stopped :)

GreenMonster
03-25-2006, 01:37 PM
In WA, towing more than 10k lbs needs a cdl too.

same here.

bobcat9957
03-25-2006, 03:53 PM
In Mass you need a CDL if its over 26001 OR pulling over 10k.

Gravel Rat
03-25-2006, 05:10 PM
That is pretty cheap for a trailer a 10 ton gooseneck trailer here would be double that easy. As for CDL it is the same here if your trailer is over 10,000lbs you need a endorsement if you get into the area where you are pulling it with a medium duty then you need a class 01 (A).

With mini's its easier to carry them than trailer them its cheaper too especially if you have a rolloff truck.

Dirty Water
03-25-2006, 06:17 PM
I don't think that's true, I was under the impression that if you're over 26,001 combined weight you need a CDL. If not, I've never been stopped :)

As far as I know, its combination weight over 26,001 OR towing more than 10k.

Dirty Water
03-25-2006, 06:23 PM
Doug:

Trying to find the information Virginia's DOT page is like pulling teeth. You might have to call them at:

1-866-368-5463

Dirty Water
03-25-2006, 06:30 PM
Found the page:

http://www.dmv.virginia.gov/webdoc/citizen/drivers/cdl_class.asp

A little confusing, but from what I understand you have to be over 26,001 lbs and towing over 10k to need a CDL A.

thepawnshop
03-25-2006, 07:14 PM
Found the page:

http://www.dmv.virginia.gov/webdoc/citizen/drivers/cdl_class.asp

A little confusing, but from what I understand you have to be over 26,001 lbs and towing over 10k to need a CDL A.

John, you are the man! I will be towing over 10k, so I guess I need to rethink a few things...BTW...I know this post belongs in the "trailer" section, but this part of the forum just feels like home...

I think I'll just go ahead and get my CDL...it can't be that hard...right?!?!?!

Gravel Rat
03-25-2006, 07:50 PM
You might aswell go legal than running the risk of getting caught. I'am really surprised you guys need a Class A cdl to pull a trailer over 10,000lbs that has vacuum/hydraulic or electric brakes.

Here in Canada all you would need is a class 03 which is what I have you can operate any straight truck any gvw or combination vehical of any gvw if combination is on juice brakes. So that would mean what you have a P/U truck with a trailer.

Getting a class 01 (A) here is a little tough you have to have quite abit of practice before you take your road test. Also the medical exam is a little stricter. I went with a class 03 (B) when I was 23 its all I need for driving tandem axle dump.

thepawnshop
03-25-2006, 08:22 PM
I agree...I downloaded the manual and will start studying. Hell, it sure can't hurt to have a CDL...it'll be nice not having to look over my shoulder!

Dirty Water
03-25-2006, 08:28 PM
I think you can get your Class A here without getting your airbrake endorsement, which is what Doug will need.

thepawnshop
03-25-2006, 08:49 PM
You are correct, Jon...

The process doesn't look too difficult. First, you must get a "CDL Learners Permit", which you get by passing a "General Knowledge" test, then you must hold the learners for 30 days and then take "transporting Cargo" exam. Once you have passed those, you take the "CDL Skills Exam", which is a three part "hands on" exam which entails the following:


Pre Trip Inspection
Basic Vehicle Control
On Road Driving


This looks like a piece of cake!

jreiff
03-25-2006, 11:26 PM
Why not jsut go and get your CDL or even your class A. We were all going to get our Class B, but it was not much more to get your Class A, so we all got and A, then we never have to worry about it.

thepawnshop
03-26-2006, 12:48 AM
Thats what Im going to do...finding the time is the hardest part, though!

JDSKIDSTEER
03-26-2006, 04:52 AM
I think you can get your Class A here without getting your air brake endorsement, which is what Doug will need.
Might as well get air brake while you are at it. It is an easy written test. I had gotten school bus license and had to do air brakes. I got class B and with a health card can drive anything except combination over 26000 lb. I just need to take time and upgrade to class A.

qps
03-26-2006, 09:50 AM
After ordering my new mini, I realized my trailer won't carry the load...

It's a 6 ton tag along that after you deduct it's own weight will only pull ten thousand lbs. So I ordered a ten ton gooseneck to the tune of $6500...OUCH!

What REALLY stinks is the fact that I will technically be overweight for me 1 ton truck!

AARRGGHH!


That's why I didn't buy the Takeuchi...to wide for my tilt trailer..Indiana DOT 10,001lbs you must have a dot number, medical card, fire ext. roadside reflectors...26,000 and up require CDL...and I think its around 200.00 to do the driving part of the test...if you miss one part...they stop you and test is over.....gotta pay again to retest, I think if you fail three times you have to wait a year...DOT is like our permit dept. here...ask three people and you'll get three totally different answers:dizzy:

janb
03-26-2006, 04:58 PM
You are correct, Jon....The process doesn't look too difficult. ..> It's a tad spendy (tests ~ $75 + contract skills testors ~$100 (in our case)

First, you must get a "CDL Learners Permit", (not required, last I heard, if you are experienced with a 'combination' / truck)

taking written is pretty simple, > ours (WA computer based test) lets you skip questions you don't know, and once you have enough "correct" answers - you pass:) . I'd took the "A" + doubles+Tankers, + air, and passenger endorsement but not Haz-mat (as you have to re-take that test every time to stay current, + it's more $$$)

You need a DOT medical card (renew every 2 yrs) before they will issue license
You need to take written test for Air brakes + you must take skills test in a vehicle equiped with Air brake (pre-trip requires some air brake skills(air bleed down time, recharge time, controls gauges, 'low air' alarm and manually checking slack adjusters) You might have a contract testor that will allow you to do the 'air - skills' portion on one of their air equipped trucks.


"CDL Skills Exam", which is a three part "hands on" exam which entails the following:


Pre Trip Inspection >- practice this with someone, so you don't miss a step (a nagging wife works well:hammerhead:)
Basic Vehicle Control >- (be sure to get out and walk around vehicle BEFORE you back, even if you just entered an empty parking lot (I missed that 'proceedure') also - sound horn BEFORE backing
On Road Driving>- (don't crash, :dizzy: and watch your RR crossings :nono: )


This looks like a piece of cake! ... >:drinkup: I get lots of use from my CDL (helping w/grain harvest, and friends and neighbors who need an 'occasional' driver, + driving buses to mexico for youth mission trips) Then there is always the possibility of a good driving job if you need one. Our local FED GOV elect power distributor (BPA) presented openings paying $28.84/hr w/ lots of double time OT + triple on holidays :dizzy: very tempting, especially when they said it was a whole summer in the Tetons !! :clapping: (maybe summer of '07 - after the fed gets done paying for my college tuition) (outsourced...:cry: )

DKinWA
03-26-2006, 05:44 PM
Don't forget to join a consortium for drug testing unless your company has their own program. You'll need to pass a preemployment drug screen to get into a program and then they put in the pool for random testing. I don't know what the penalty is in Washington for not being in a program, but I'm sure it's not cheap.

RockSet N' Grade
03-26-2006, 09:11 PM
I am here in Utah and "things" started changing rapidly last year and is continuing full force already this year in regards to trailers, trucks and cdl's.

If you are pulling a trailer over 10,000 lbs you need a CDL and the wonderful stuff that they are demanding is: fire extinguisher inside your pick-up, weight rating and sinage posted on your side doors of your pick-up, copies(in your truck) of commercial insurance for your rig along with registration for your trailer and truck. I even heard the other day that a loaded landscape trailer was put on a portable scale to see if it was overweight. They are tightening up here big time and heaven forbid any one of your trailer lights is not working ( from markers to signals).....its a fix it ticket immediately. And another good one....make sure you are familiar with how to tie down your track hoe and make sure there is no loose dirt or mud on the trailer, that has become a real big no-no. Cops drive by my rig, slow down and count my chains and make sure each hydraulically operated unit on my track hoe is chanined down along with the regular chains. It has all become a huge issue here.......

RockSet N' Grade
03-26-2006, 09:18 PM
Most truck dealerships have a certified trainer. They will supply the truck from their lot and teach/test you for the actual driving part of the test. Cost is usually around $500 for that deal.
Call a DMV and get their green CDL booklet and study that first and get the written out of the way.....I went first for a "B" and then half way through figured it was just as easy to get an "A", so I took another exam and got my "A".

TXTom
03-29-2006, 12:03 AM
This is the rule as it reads in Texas.
A CDL is required for:
"A vehicle towing a unit with a manufacturer's GVWR of more than 10,000 lbs. when the GCWR exceeds 26,000 lbs"

My F250 Crewcab has a GVWR of 9900lbs, and my Trailer has a GVWR of 14,000lbs. So I can tow my Bobcat and all attachments all day long without a CDL in Texas.

Tom

TXTom
03-29-2006, 12:12 AM
John, you are the man! I will be towing over 10k, so I guess I need to rethink a few things...BTW...I know this post belongs in the "trailer" section, but this part of the forum just feels like home...

I think I'll just go ahead and get my CDL...it can't be that hard...right?!?!?!

Doug,

After reading the specs, I do not believe you need a CDL. The CDL-A is for trucks with a GCWR of 26,001 or more towing a trailer over 10,000. The CDL-B is for trucks with a GCWR of 26,001 or more towing a trailer less than 10,000. Unless your tow vehicle has a GCWR of 26,001 or more you do not need a CDL. See the rule from Texas. I believe it is the same, just easier to read.

Tom

janb
03-29-2006, 06:51 PM
""My F250 Crewcab has a GVWR of 9900lbs, and my Trailer has a GVWR of 14,000lbs. So I can tow my Bobcat and all attachments all day long without a CDL in Texas.""

your safe...it is the GVWR that they look for, My trailer is tagged for 20,000#, so my wife cannot bring me lunch with an empty trailer and truck (gvwr10k) (she has a Class C CDL (worked for Fed-x))

CDL rules are uniform 'nation-wide'
http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration-licensing/cdl/cdl.htm

Drivers have been required to have a CDL in order to drive a CMV since April 1, 1992.

The Federal standard requires States to issue a CDL to drivers according to the following license classifications:

Class A -- Any combination of vehicles with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.

Class B -- Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 pounds GVWR.

Class C -- Any single vehicle, or combination of vehicles, that does not meet the definition of Class A or Class B, but is either designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver, or is placarded for hazardous materials.


good to read the rules every so often, as I notice that cruising around in a CMV without DOT card can cost you $538 in WA state