PDA

View Full Version : More Ball Valves


PurpHaze
03-25-2006, 02:43 PM
I think I mentioned in another thread that we've been in the process of changing out (as they break) brass angle valves and gate valves on baseball and softball fields to PVC ball valves because of all the breakage problems from cranking them down too tight. Here's another one for the books. Pictures show the conversion to ball valves for manual zones that water down a skinned infield for game prep.

Picture #1: Round boxes with cast iron lids are the 2" right angle valves, two of which were broken. Round concrete lid has the 2" isolation gate valve. Stem was broken on it and the wedge was in closed position. The rectangle vault to the left contains automatic valves that are supplied from a different POC.

Picture #2: I thought the concrete was only a slurry but OOPS... 6" thick.

Picture #3: Out came the electric jack hammer.

Picture #4: Original configuration of isolation gate valve and right angle valves.

PurpHaze
03-25-2006, 02:48 PM
Picture #5: New PVC ball valves installed including one as an isolation valve. Decided to work "backwards" which would give me the easiest install and final glue point.

Picture #6: Working backwards, tees and 90 el glued in.

Picture #7: Last glue joint was the short pipe between 90s in lower-right corner which gave me the greatest amount of flex. Piece of cake.

Picture #8: Semi-finished (dirt would be brought in next day to finish backfill). Round box is isolation valve and Jumbo rectangle box is the three ball valves for the zones.

jerryrwm
03-25-2006, 02:54 PM
Hayes, that's a good looking manifold. Only thin I would like to see is a little more room between the valve and the tees. That way the entire manifold doesn't have to be replaced. Just my thoughts.

Critical Care
03-25-2006, 03:31 PM
That looks neat, Hayes. All of dem valves lined up nicely! While understanding wanting to get away from the brass gate valves I'm still a bit shocked that you didn't go with brass ball valves.

sheshovel
03-25-2006, 03:38 PM
You and me both Critical.What was he thinking?
Purp did these himself..you can tell by the neat and tidy glueing.

Dirty Water
03-25-2006, 03:38 PM
I would have used these:

http://www.fordmeterbox.com/media/minnvlv.jpg

I'll never understand the practice of pouring concrete around valve boxes.

greenscapes,inc.
03-25-2006, 05:12 PM
I agree, I have had a lot of problems with those plastic ball valves. If get alot of pressure behind those things they are almost impossible to open or close. It looks nice and neat.

PurpHaze
03-26-2006, 10:40 AM
Hayes, that's a good looking manifold. Only thin I would like to see is a little more room between the valve and the tees. That way the entire manifold doesn't have to be replaced. Just my thoughts.

I actually thought about keeping the tees outside the box and giving it more room for future maintenance. Judgement call as I decided to keep everything compact.

PurpHaze
03-26-2006, 10:46 AM
That looks neat, Hayes. All of dem valves lined up nicely! While understanding wanting to get away from the brass gate valves I'm still a bit shocked that you didn't go with brass ball valves.

Thanks CC. Our maintenance plumbers use brass ball valves all the time while we do not. Main reason is that the connection of the handle to the valve is a very weak point in my opinion and it's extremely subject to rusting. I haven't come across a brass ball valve in the ground yet that didn't have some sort of problem with it's handle from rust up to and including the handle snapping off when you try and operate it. The plumbers are always replacing their brass ball valves but they keep putting them in. :dizzy:

PurpHaze
03-26-2006, 10:56 AM
Purp did these himself..you can tell by the neat and tidy glueing.

LOL... Sanka veddy much. Sometimes I can even type neatly. :laugh:

I would have used these:

Looks similar to a curb stop. The main reason I didn't use something like it is that I wanted to get all tools out of the hands of site groundsworkers, coaches and do-gooders that might activate these zones. Now they have to get down on their hands and knees to activate the zones. Perhaps they'll be a little more careful now. :hammerhead:

I'll never understand the practice of pouring concrete around valve boxes.

Me neither but it happens all the time. You can see in one of the pictures where there is a "broken up" concrete area to the left of where I did this repair job. That's from about four years ago when I had to repair the main line that runs through this area. It's never been re-concreted.

Wet_Boots
03-26-2006, 01:22 PM
Ball valves can be had with stainless steel lever handles and retaining nuts, as an option when you order them. You'll be replacing the valve itself, before the handle needs replacing.

PurpHaze
03-26-2006, 09:05 PM
Then when the nut is loosened, comes off and disappears the handle won't be far behind. Then out come the pliers and the handle stud is chewed up and then replacement has to be made. :hammerhead:

koster_irrigation
03-29-2006, 10:08 PM
spears pvc ball valves are pretty much the best.

if you break the blue handle you can pull the remaining part up and off and replace it with a new one. nice feature. customers are constantly breaking them with meter keys...

Critical Care
03-29-2006, 10:17 PM
customers are constantly breaking them with meter keys...

Well, that almost sounds like a good reason not to go the pvc route.

Dirty Water
03-29-2006, 10:22 PM
Well, that almost sounds like a good reason not to go the pvc route.

Yup...In the past 6 or so years our company has been using Ford brass ball valves, we've replaced.....

0.

:)

koster_irrigation
03-29-2006, 10:22 PM
our curb stops are bronze/brass, ford of course, these pvc handles breaking are on about 2 jobsites whos problems never seem to end...

PurpHaze
03-29-2006, 10:51 PM
Guess there must be a "learning curve" for people to realize that a ball valve only needs 1/4 turn. :laugh:

I'll keep you posted. If they don't work the only other option would be to go to a curb stop and they are spendy. :dizzy:

Critical Care
03-29-2006, 11:18 PM
Guess there must be a "learning curve" for people to realize that a ball valve only needs 1/4 turn.

But some go around and around and around, though the 1/4 turn will generally do the trick.

No, in all honesty, I have a job on the back burner where a hefty 2" (Ford?) valve is leaking. It's not directly my worry other than it makes my downstream work a lot tougher. Hmmm... you think I should suggest pvc for the replacement?

PurpHaze
03-29-2006, 11:29 PM
But some go around and around and around, though the 1/4 turn will generally do the trick.

The Spears have a "hard click" and won't go any further.

No, in all honesty, I have a job on the back burner where a hefty 2" (Ford?) valve is leaking. It's not directly my worry other than it makes my downstream work a lot tougher. Hmmm... you think I should suggest pvc for the replacement?

What's the function of the Ford valve?

koster_irrigation
03-30-2006, 07:54 AM
its like a brass ball valve, usually installed as a curb stop in a water meter box

PurpHaze
03-30-2006, 09:06 AM
its like a brass ball valve, usually installed as a curb stop in a water meter box

I know that!!! :laugh:

I should have asked, "What specifically is the Ford curb stop being used for? Is it isolating an area or is it being used as an operational valve for a zone?" :)

Critical Care
03-30-2006, 02:56 PM
Hayes, this particular curb stop valve that I mentioned is the main shutoff for a dedicated ag and landscape irrigation system.

I've never seen one leak like this. This last fall I thought that I'd never get the thing turned off so that I could get the system blown out. Not only was it leaking through, but it was leaking out.

I'm sure that some of you know the sinking feeling that you suddenly get when a main shutoff valve fails and begins to vent water. Oh man, there ain't nothing like diving headfirst into a valve box overflowing with mud and icy cold water. By the way, these occurances never happen on warm days do they?

PurpHaze
03-31-2006, 09:28 AM
No, in all honesty, I have a job on the back burner where a hefty 2" (Ford?) valve is leaking. It's not directly my worry other than it makes my downstream work a lot tougher. Hmmm... you think I should suggest pvc for the replacement?

Now that I know it's the main isolation valve I'd replace it with the likes of what you have in there. (See below.) I'd shy away from PVC isolation valves unless they're for something very specific, like in my case where the PVC ball valve isolated three other ball valves for those manual infield sprinklers. I have three other points of isolation upstream (gate valve, RW valve, main backflow) that I can use so I'm not too worried about failure.

Hayes, this particular curb stop valve that I mentioned is the main shutoff for a dedicated ag and landscape irrigation system.

I'd say it's quite unusual that a Ford curb stop failed on you. They are pretty reliable valves. It'll be interesting to see if there's something out of the ordinary (such as scoring, etc.) when you remove it.

I'm sure that some of you know the sinking feeling that you suddenly get when a main shutoff valve fails and begins to vent water. Oh man, there ain't nothing like diving headfirst into a valve box overflowing with mud and icy cold water. By the way, these occurances never happen on warm days do they?

It's the nature of the beast. If irrigation work was a walk in the park then everyone would think they'd be able to do it. Wait... most already think that. :laugh:

It's what seperates the true irrigators from just some Joe Blow with wet boots. (Boots... note the small letters. LOL) :hammerhead: