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jcom
03-25-2006, 09:17 PM
We have a customer that is going to have two water supplies. A rural water system for the area close to their rural home with good quality water. A well with high iron for the area away from their residence.

Another installer told them they must have two controllers. I told them one is enough. I propose to connect the well zones to a 24v relay off the controller using only the specific zones we designate to activate the relay.

This is our first with dual water supplies and we don't see any flaws with the above scenario.

Thanks all you sharpshooters! :weightlifter: :weightlifter:

John :usflag: :usflag:

Dirty Water
03-25-2006, 09:20 PM
Just use a master valve and a backflow prevented between the two.

jerryrwm
03-25-2006, 11:33 PM
You should not connect the two water supplies. In other words, you will have two main lines each with their own valves. They can be controlled by the same controller however. There are controllers that allow you to activate the pump for individual stations so this shouldn't be a problem.

Most codes do not allow you to connect differing water supplies. This is a cross connection. Best to run a main for the house zones and a seperate main for the lawn zones. You won't use any more pipe, they just won't be connected.

Dirty Water
03-26-2006, 01:11 AM
Jerry,

We have lots of clients here cross connected between a seasional ditch feed and Utility water. Code allows for it with proper backflow installation.

jerryrwm
03-26-2006, 03:34 AM
Jerry,

We have lots of clients here cross connected between a seasional ditch feed and Utility water. Code allows for it with proper backflow installation.

Hopefully it's with an RPZ and not a DCA or PVB.

jcom
03-26-2006, 10:04 AM
We will keep the two sources separate. Plan on two separate systems controlled by one controller.

Which controller(s) allow you to operate the pump only for specific zones?

Thanks for the info, folks.

John:rolleyes:

JeffY
03-26-2006, 10:52 AM
Hunter Pro C allows you to set which zones get the master pump and which don't.

PurpHaze
03-26-2006, 11:52 AM
Like others have suggested I'd keep the water sources separate and use a controller (like Jeffy suggested) that will allow you to program which zones will activate the pump.

In regrads to Jon's suggestion, we do have some of our systems cross-connected with RPs between them. These are some of the high use, high visibility sports areas that can't afford to be down for very long in summer heat. In the event the pump goes down then the watering can be switched to domestic service until such time that the pump is up and running again.

BSME
03-26-2006, 12:58 PM
Hunter Pro C allows you to set which zones get the master pump and which don't.

How do you do that?

I never knew you could do that with the pro c... I'll go read the manual if it's not an easy explanation

Dirty Water
03-26-2006, 01:03 PM
You can do that with the Rainbird ESP also.

PurpHaze
03-26-2006, 09:09 PM
How do you do that?

I never knew you could do that with the pro c... I'll go read the manual if it's not an easy explanation

It's in the "hidden advanced" area of the manual or something like that.

Rainman7
03-26-2006, 09:39 PM
Pro-C or ICC turn the dial to "Set Pump Operation" the rest is pretty self explanatory.

JeffY
03-27-2006, 08:58 PM
Pro-C or ICC turn the dial to "Set Pump Operation" the rest is pretty self explanatory.


Exactly. It's set on "ON" on all stations by default. Using the arrow keys, switch it to "Off" and the pump won't kick in for that station.

I usually use this when I have two or more valve boxes out in the yard. The first valve box from the tap will have it's supply in PVC, the second valve box usually will have it's supply from one of the valves in the first valve box (master valve.) Since I don't need to run the pump/master valve for any of the valves in the first valve box, I will set the pump operations to "Off" for those stations to prevent the poly from between the master valve and 2nd valve box being constantly filled/pressured while those valves in the first box are being run.

PurpHaze
03-27-2006, 10:33 PM
I usually use this when I have two or more valve boxes out in the yard. The first valve box from the tap will have it's supply in PVC, the second valve box usually will have it's supply from one of the valves in the first valve box (master valve.) Since I don't need to run the pump/master valve for any of the valves in the first valve box, I will set the pump operations to "Off" for those stations to prevent the poly from between the master valve and 2nd valve box being constantly filled/pressured while those valves in the first box are being run.

OK... now you have me confused. Poly won't take the constant pressure of basically being a main line or am I misreading this? :)

Dirty Water
03-27-2006, 10:38 PM
OK... now you have me confused. Poly won't take the constant pressure of basically being a main line or am I misreading this? :)

Depends on the grade of poly. Lots of poly is not rated for constant pressure.

Out here, almost all domestic lines are poly up to the meter and then to the house. (Huge Saddle tee's on the mainline with curbstops, then poly).

This poly is much thicker.

PurpHaze
03-27-2006, 10:42 PM
Depends on the grade of poly. Lots of poly is not rated for constant pressure.

Hope no one grabs the wrong Poly. :laugh:

Out here, almost all domestic lines are poly up to the meter and then to the house. (Huge Saddle tee's on the mainline with curbstops, then poly).

This poly is much thicker.

Probably HDPE. Searching for info on that last year brought me to this site. :clapping:

Wet_Boots
03-28-2006, 09:39 AM
Utility grades of poly aren't recommended for continuous pressure, even though there seems to be no noticeable difference between utility and NSF poly. I very rarely see any utility pipe used as continuous-pressure mainlines, and I do recall some small leaks developing in such applications. More like pinholes than blowouts. As a sprinkler system main line, utility poly seems to be okay. I'll bump up the grade of mainline poly when the static supply pressure is higher than 100 psi.

Water service poly is much thicker than lawn sprinkler poly. I suspect they use compression fittings for all the connections.

By the way, if you encounter PEX water service lines, you should be able to cut into it with compression fittings used for SIDR 9 CTS (copper tube size) poly.