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ripple
03-27-2006, 08:28 PM
Does there exist a tool for digging holes on a hill?

The client lives on the down hill side of the road and wants a tree line up by the road...but the hill starts steep about 10' off the road.
Need to plant 40 trees on this hill so a pick and shovel are out of the question!
I have used a 30" power auger attachment on a toro compact machine but I think this hill is too steep.
Any suggestions?

sheshovel
03-27-2006, 09:02 PM
Can you get us a few pictures?A pick and shovel are not out of the question!Sometimes they are the only solution!

ripple
03-27-2006, 09:11 PM
Can you get us a few pictures?A pick and shovel are not out of the question!Sometimes they are the only solution!
I will get some pics....but basically its just a road that cuts across a steep hill...and I need to plant trees (6'-8' hemlocks) and 40 of them.
I was hoping there is some sort of power BOOM auger that I could rent....

sheshovel
03-27-2006, 09:17 PM
How are they going to hold on the hill once fully mature?

ripple
03-27-2006, 09:21 PM
How are they going to hold on the hill once fully mature?
If well maintained ie....proper soil when planted, lots of watering, Steaked up for the first year or two....the roots will hold...

sheshovel
03-27-2006, 09:31 PM
How you going to water them up there?

sheshovel
03-27-2006, 09:33 PM
In order to plant properly on a steep hill(I do not recommend doing so with trees that will be really big when mature)
Then you are going to have to dig BACK into the hill to get a good base for a planting hole

sheshovel
03-27-2006, 09:40 PM
'''''''''''''''''''''

sheshovel
03-27-2006, 09:43 PM
As you can see this creates a problem cuz rainwater rushes over the top of the rootball from above and scours away the soil aroung the trees roots.This causes them to fail and die usually

ripple
03-27-2006, 10:34 PM
Hmmmm....I 'll take pics so you can see ...maybe it is too steep...
thanks for the replies

PSUturf
03-28-2006, 03:41 PM
If you do plant on that steep slope the smaller the tree the better. Then you wouldn't have to dig a s far into the hill as Sheshovel suggested. The client probably won't like it but if you give them the explanation about the erosion factor washing away their investment they might be more understanding.

CutRight
03-28-2006, 06:51 PM
i know kubota makes post hole augers for their mini-excavators, see if you can rent one of those, if it has enough reach for your application.

or maybe theres augers for larger machines im not sure.

CutRight
03-28-2006, 06:53 PM
but i would also suggest some differnt plant materials for the steep slope, some ground cover type plants whose roots would hold the soil in place. or maybe some small shrubs.

sheshovel
03-28-2006, 06:54 PM
No kidding!

ripple
03-29-2006, 09:40 PM
The customer wants the trees all along the road (about 10' in)

phototropic1
03-29-2006, 10:36 PM
How are they going to hold on the hill once fully mature?

How? The same way trees on hills in the woods hold on the hill. With their ROOTS! And hemlocks seem a good choice for this. They are often seen on moist slopes in the mountains. Sheshovel brought up a valid point, however, in asking how you plan to water these trees. Make sure you figure that out prior to getting started! As for planting depth, gauge your depth by viewing directly across the hill at the trunk. Stake the tree well (3 stakes and wire or better, arbortie. I would also suggest reinforcing the downhill side of the backfill mound to prevent erosion. I have used old bamboo stakes, rotting 2X4's, sturdy sticks, etc and just driven them in sort of like a crooked row of teeth. The more haphazard a pattern you use for doing this, the better.
It is hard to tell from the picture, but I've used a Toro Dingo (TX 425, wide track....better traction) with 30" auger on a slope this steep. We were careful to approach each planting site from directly uphill and always carry each tree(or the auger) as low as possible. We also built a small ramp in order to provide the Dingo a level surface while doing the augering. Pictures are deceiving, though, so I might be misjudging this slope. Maybe you need a small excavator. If you are careful to distribute your weight correctly and suuport your downhill side with your grading blade on an excavator, you should have little problem. MAKE SURE all helpers know not to stand downhill from any equipment!!! And wear your seatbelt!!! Again, it's hard to tell for sure from a picture.
I think trees would be wonderful on this slope. It looks so bare! Make sure you account for a lot of labor time for this job. Have fun and be careful!

CutRight
03-29-2006, 11:25 PM
now that i see a picture this slope should be no problem, just be careful with whatever equipment you use and watch your weight distribution. the above post is all good advice. anything you plant wont have a problem staying on this slope and they will help to control erosion. if it was me i would just bring my mini-ex there or my tractor there to dig the holes, mini-ex would be more stable. any type of auger attachment will work also. just be careful on the slope.

ripple
03-30-2006, 08:01 AM
THANKS again for the replies. In the picture if you look near the jeep that is where the hill is really steep, but the rest is not that bad....maybe I can use the toro with auger for 75% of the holes but do the rest by hand.

phototropic1
03-30-2006, 08:16 AM
One extra tip for drilling holes with the 30" auger on the hillside. If you approach from uphill, set the tip of your auger where you will begin drilling and then drive forward slightly until the auger is perpindicular to the slope. Now slowly begin drilling your hole. Once the hole is started, you can back up slighly and allow your auger to hang plumb. If you try to start out with the auger hanging plumb, you'll have a hard time getting it to penetrate the ground. It will want to jump around all over the place. Enjoy.

sheshovel
03-31-2006, 06:47 PM
OH I woulden't call that steep at all..just get an auger and do it.That's why I asked for a pic see?.
Now looks to me like this guy has tried this before and lost every tree..I see a row of dead something there.Do not guarantee the tree's will live if it is up to the customer to water them.Water them in real good when you plant them and the rest is on him.

mdb landscaping
03-31-2006, 08:41 PM
we would use our 331 bobcat excavator and the auger head mounted on it to do a job like that. its really not even that bad looking, you could probably get away with using a regular skidsteer with an auger.