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View Full Version : Backyard system connected to outside faucet


hect911
03-29-2006, 05:27 PM
I am installing a sprinkler system in a house and the customer wants his backyard done too. The problem is that his house is surrounded by concrete and I cannot get the main line to the backyard without breaking the concrete. So I suggested that we can hook up the backyard system to an exterior water faucet.

Any ideas on how I can determine the available GPM etc. etc. etc. to make sure everything works out?

Thanks in advance

Grassmechanic
03-29-2006, 06:03 PM
Run a whole seperate supply to the backyard. Kinda like having two sprinkler systems. I wouldn't use a hose bibb. They are usually only 1/2". Besides, it would look awful tacky and unprofessional, not to mention backflow prevention issues.

Green Sweep
03-29-2006, 06:47 PM
We had the same situation. We T'd the mainline in the basement & sent one out in front & one out in back. Also installed 2 master valves. 99% of our P.O.C.'s here are in basements. I don't think that you have that luxury in Texas. I do agree that threading on to an outdoor hose bib is unprofessional & the flow restriction will create very small zones.

Rob

Wet_Boots
03-29-2006, 07:17 PM
The Toro Flow & Pressure gauge assembly could easily read the hose bib capacity. It is difficult to make such a connection look professional. Doing it entirely in brass and copper can help it look good and be durable, too. Of course, you need to have proper backflow protection.

Sometimes, there is no practical means to have a basement P.O.C., when dealing with a finished basement. It becomes a comparison between the possible cost of extra zones, to make up for the hose bib supply, compared for the time and material involved it ripping out and replacing part of the finished basement. <b>IF</b> sufficient water can be had from that hose bib, then it can be used for the lawn sprinklers, without misgivings.

Dirty Water
03-29-2006, 09:57 PM
We do it on occasion if there is no way to tap the meter (incased in concrete etc).

We use a Lee valley Hose Y valve so the homeowner can still use his hose bib, and then use a brass 45 and a hose thread to pipe thread adapter to get it oriented parrelell to the house.

Run a SCH 80 nipple below grade and install backflow and your set.

This is the lee valley Hose Y we use (Not our install, this is a pic I found on the web).

http://bluenose.cps-ecp.org/tip/watercrossfeednew.jpg

koster_irrigation
03-29-2006, 09:59 PM
thats a nice rig!

hect911
03-29-2006, 10:31 PM
I've been wanting to order the Toro Flow and Pressure gauge, seems pretty helpful. Is there a flow gauge that will measure more than 13 GPM or is the Toro the only out there?

I am also thinking of installing the Rain Bird anti-siphon valves in the backyard since its only a very small area. I'll be using a Double Check Assembly in the front yard.

koster_irrigation
03-29-2006, 10:33 PM
that toro flo thing really isnt worth the time, i had one and it fell off the truck and broke. its good for measuing psi, but you have to figure your psi loss through the house piping system... & your gpm is of that spicket, not what your meter and potentially provide

Wet_Boots
03-29-2006, 10:34 PM
I would still say brass and copper look best, and for above-ground backflow preventers, provide needed support. In freezing climates, I hate to see ball valves outdoors unless they're absolutely necessary. As far as the Toro Flow and Pressure Gauge goes, it will measure what a hose bib delivers, at varying flows and pressures, as you adjust its gate valve, which gives you the information you need about what the hose bib can supply to a sprinkler system.

iluvscag
03-29-2006, 10:44 PM
I am installing a sprinkler system in a house and the customer wants his backyard done too. The problem is that his house is surrounded by concrete and I cannot get the main line to the backyard without breaking the concrete. So I suggested that we can hook up the backyard system to an exterior water faucet.

Any ideas on how I can determine the available GPM etc. etc. etc. to make sure everything works out?

Thanks in advance

By the way welcome to Seansite.com I mean Lawnsite

PurpHaze
03-29-2006, 11:07 PM
that toro flo thing really isnt worth the time, i had one and it fell off the truck and broke.

No wonder you're switching to vans. :laugh:

PurpHaze
03-29-2006, 11:11 PM
I am installing a sprinkler system in a house and the customer wants his backyard done too. The problem is that his house is surrounded by concrete and I cannot get the main line to the backyard without breaking the concrete. So I suggested that we can hook up the backyard system to an exterior water faucet.

Some will say yes and some will say no; I prefer not. If you do go off the hose bibb your supply will be very limited and you'll have to plan accordingly. Your supply and pressure will also be at the mercy of anything running in the house ahead of the hose bibb. Best bet would be to leave it up to the customer to decide: (1) break up concrete or bore it; (2) do back yard off very limted supply.

hect911
03-30-2006, 12:29 AM
The customer has already decided that it will be off a very limited water supply. Anyways, it is a very small area.

Wet_Boots
03-30-2006, 01:07 AM
I've been wanting to order the Toro Flow and Pressure gauge, seems pretty helpful. Is there a flow gauge that will measure more than 13 GPM or is the Toro the only out there?

I am also thinking of installing the Rain Bird anti-siphon valves in the backyard since its only a very small area. I'll be using a Double Check Assembly in the front yard.If there's another flow gauge setup that measures beyond 13 gpm, I haven't seen it. I haven't looked for one either, since most hose bibs would be lucky to supply the 13 gpm. It's the low flows you want an accurate measurement of, so you can design to fit.

If code allows, antisyphon valves would be fine. Not as durable as above-ground brass and copper, but certainly functional.

PurpHaze
03-30-2006, 09:19 AM
The customer has already decided that it will be off a very limited water supply. Anyways, it is a very small area.

You might try something like MP Rotators if they fit the size of lawn you're looking at. And if you keep the connection, backflow and valve(s) (or automatic ASVs) neat and orderly things will work out.