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TheHotShotKid
04-04-2006, 08:25 PM
Clients are concerned about the effects lighting may have on plants in the landscape. To understand how these types of lighting may affect the plant we need to understand how plants use light. Light influences plant growth through quality (wavelength or color of the light spectrum), intensity (irradiance), and lighting duration. Light visible to the naked eye occurs in the wavelengths from 380 to 760 nanometers (nm). The wavelength of 380 nm is visible to us as violet. The wavelength of 760 is visible to us as red. Wavelengths in between are seen as the colors of the rainbow, the light spectrum.
Light controls many plant processes. For example, light in the 400-450 nm (blue) and 625-700 nm (red) wavelengths is required for photosynthesis. Photoperiod responses occur in the red wavelengths. Phototropic (growth of plants toward the light source) responses occur in the blue wavelengths. Plants are grouped into three areas based on photoperiod responses; short-day, long-day, and day-neutral. Short-day plants initiate flower buds when days are shorter than a critical point. A more appropriate name may be long-night plant. Long-day plants continue in a vegetative state until day length is longer than a critical point. A more appropriate name for this group of plants may be short-night plant. Flowering for day-neutral plants is not controlled by photoperiod. When given light for 24 hours, short-day plants continue to grow vegetatively and flowering is inhibited. Long-day plants are induced to flower earlier and continue to put on vegetative growth. Day-neutral plants continue to grow vegetatively. A concern with landscape lighting is that plants will continue vegetative growth late in the season. This late growth will not have the opportunity to harden off properly before winter and may experience severe winter injury.

The most common types of lighting include incandescent, high-pressure sodium, metal halide, and mercury vapor. A study by Cathey and Campbell, published in the mid-70's, compared five light sources and their effects on promoting vegetative growth of woody plants, delaying flowering of short-day plants, and promoting flowering of long-day plants. Sources were ranked from most effective (those able to promote vegetative growth) to least effective. Incandescent > High Pressure Sodium > Metal Halide = Cool White Fluorescent > Clear Mercury. Thus, for landscape lighting we would want to avoid those lights (like incandescent) that promote vegetative growth.

Incandescent lights produce all wavelengths of light and are closest to natural sunlight. Incandescent is the least expensive light source to purchase, but the most expensive to operate because of short lamp life and low efficiency. Oddly enough it still remains the most popular type of lighting for residential landscapes. Metal halide is more efficient to operate and has wavelengths in the blue-green-red area. It has better color emission than mercury, but not quite as good as incandescent. Mercury vapor lamps emit light in the blue-green range which accentuates the green color of plants. High-pressure sodium lights are highly efficient. They emit more yellow and red wavelengths which doesn't do much for the color of anything. They are best used strictly for security lighting rather than enhancement of a landscape feature. Fluorescent lights are seldom used for landscape lighting.

The important thing to remember is that light isn't the only factor involved in plant growth. Temperature, water, fertilization, and soil type can also influence plant growth. Light given off by street and landscape lighting, in most cases, is not intense enough to affect plant growth.

Some things can be done to avoid possible problems with landscape lighting. Select the proper light for the area. For security purposes, high-pressure sodium lights are the best choice. Metal halide would be preferred over incandescent in residential areas, malls, parks, etc., where true color is important. Lights that may affect plant growth can be shielded to direct light away from plants. Select plants tolerant of security lighting. Many plants, long-day and day-neutral species, are better adapted to these locations. A brief list of suggested plant species for security lighted areas includes:

Carpinus japonica Hornbeam
Ginkgo biloba Ginkgo
Malus sargenti Sargent's crabapple
Pyrus calleryana Bradford pear
Quercus palustris Pin oak
Tilia cordata Littleleaf linden
Phellodendron amurense Amur corktree
Ostrya virginiana American hophornbeam
Gleditsia triacanthos Honeylocust
Cercis canadensis Redbud

Plants sensitive to security lighting include:

Acer ginnala Amur maple
Acer platanoides Norway maple
Catalpa bignonioides Catalpa
Cornus sericea Red-osier dogwood

steveparrott
04-05-2006, 02:57 PM
Hotshot,

I don't think Sean would appreciate your violation of copyright laws in this forum. The text in your post is copied from an article in Horticulture and Pest News. In the future I suggest you provide references.

TheHotShotKid
04-05-2006, 03:12 PM
Parrott,

Maybe it is originally from their but that's not where I copied and pasted it from. It was taken verbatim from another message board site where there was no credit to it's publisher.
Kind of ironic coming from someone who posted under my thread entitled "fraud at the highest degree" that it was ok for a website to use photos that weren't theirs. :hammerhead:

steveparrott
04-05-2006, 05:31 PM
Having permission is the key point. Even copying and pasting text from another board is copyright infringement. Taking a small passage or quote is OK, but not long passages.

TheHotShotKid
04-05-2006, 06:03 PM
"Taking a small passage or quote is OK, but not long passages."

Says who? Interesting that you would pick on me after I promote your company for you here for free.:nono: :nono:

Why don't you tell us what it's called when a new lighting company takes another's whole "system" knocks it off part and parcel and represents it likes it's it's own. Or how about fixture designs? Taking a classic fixture that was manufactured by one company out of a certain material and then making it out of another and passing it off as an original design. Why don't you enlighten us on what that's called? :nono:

steveparrott
04-05-2006, 08:36 PM
HotShot,

I'm not picking on you - just trying to keep this board on a professional level, offering constructive criticism when I feel it's appropriate.

Answers to your questions:

"Taking a small passage or quote is OK, but not long passages."

"Says who?"

It's called the "Fair Use" doctrine as it applies to copyright laws.
http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html

"Interesting that you would pick on me after I promote your company for you here for free."

Thank you.

"Why don't you tell us what it's called when a new lighting company takes another's whole "system" knocks it off part and parcel and represents it likes it's it's own. Or how about fixture designs? Taking a classic fixture that was manufactured by one company out of a certain material and then making it out of another and passing it off as an original design. Why don't you enlighten us on what that's called?"

There's nothing wrong with starting with the best products and systems on the market, then re-engineering them to make them better through a multitude of improvements – ending up with products that are quite different (and better). You should be complaining about the manufacturers that start with the best products and make them worse to cut costs.

TheHotShotKid
04-05-2006, 08:50 PM
When I recommended Frog lights you wrote this....

"I repeat:

Trying to save a few dollars in fixture cost is a pointless effort. The most successful installers buy the best possible materials and set prices accordingly.

The best investment in your business is in building your reputation as a designer who never compromises on quality."

Not only is it unprofessional but classless to invade a message bd. sponsored by a competitior, put their product line down and be disrespectful to promote your own products on their dime. Why don't you sponsor your own site and practice such tactics. Give the Frog a break you are not playing fair.:confused:

steveparrott
04-05-2006, 09:20 PM
My post wasn't directed at Frog Lights. It was directed at the whole thread that initially refered to an increase in Vista prices.

I've been very careful to be respectful in all my posts. The only time I even mention CAST is when someone else mentions it first. I'm not here to promote CAST, I am honestly passionate about the betterment of the industry and gladly offer my comments with that intention. I enjoy this open forum of ideas and put my marketing hat on the table when making comments here.

Noel and I have a respectful relationship. You seem to be the only one who has a problem with my posts.

NightScenes
04-05-2006, 09:27 PM
My post wasn't directed at Frog Lights. It was directed at the whole thread that initially refered to an increase in Vista prices.

I've been very careful to be respectful in all my posts. The only time I even mention CAST is when someone else mentions it first. I'm not here to promote CAST, I am honestly passionate about the betterment of the industry and gladly offer my comments with that intention. I enjoy this open forum of ideas and put my marketing hat on the table when making comments here.

Noel and I have a respectful relationship. You seem to be the only one who has a problem with my posts.

Steve, you are right on. By the way, Rich sent me one of your path/spread lights today so I could show it to a client. That thing is built like a tank!! We'll see what she says. She will let me know tonight if she wants me to design her lighting system. It looks like it will be the first CAST job that I will be doing.

YardPro
04-05-2006, 10:01 PM
hey hot shot.

did you happen to notice that the report you are quoting is 30 years old and referting to "security" lighting... lights on poles, etc....

never seen a high pressure sodium low voltage landscape light, or even a mercury vapor.

you are using a report that is referencing large 500 watt lights, that produce 5K lumens and are designed to flood large areas with light for visibility and security.

Mike & Lucia
04-07-2006, 11:34 PM
Up until this point I have remained silent with regard to HotShot's abrasive posts, reading them mostly for amusement. I must admit, I have even responded to one or two of his one sentence questions with bona fide thought-out information. But, this one is flat out wrong.

Steve Parrott and the whole Cast team are an A#1 class act. Steve is passionate about landscape lighting beyond the purpose of doing his job. He is respectful of his competitors, full-well knowing that his equipment is far superior to most. I have found Steve to be a man of his word (not easy to find today), a gentleman and a valuable resource. His intention to help elevate the level of professionalism in our industry goes well beyond his commitment to Cast Lighting.

Oh, one more point: we all know EXACTLY who Steve is and from where he comes. Who is HotShot?

Michael Deo
NatureScape Lighting
Millington, NJ

Travisty
04-08-2006, 11:23 AM
We have been using just cast bullets and Vista/Kichler for paths and other lights. But man, those Cast bullets. I tell the customer to tell the gardners to be careful because if they run over one with the lawnmower it might destroy the lawnmower. But the light will be fine.. hehehe :laugh:

I am really excited to start taking a look at all the products that are talked about. I have only really been exposed to CAst, Kichler, and Vista. I would like to take a look at some other's. Hey paul when you come down do you have any Frog-Lights stuff?

Travis Schiffner
ShadowScapes

NightScenes
04-08-2006, 12:06 PM
We have been using just cast bullets and Vista/Kichler for paths and other lights. But man, those Cast bullets. I tell the customer to tell the gardners to be careful because if they run over one with the lawnmower it might destroy the lawnmower. But the light will be fine.. hehehe :laugh:

I am really excited to start taking a look at all the products that are talked about. I have only really been exposed to CAst, Kichler, and Vista. I would like to take a look at some other's. Hey paul when you come down do you have any Frog-Lights stuff?

Travis Schiffner
ShadowScapes

Travis, I will see you in a few days. It will be great to put a face to the name, of course I have seen the poster picture of the movie.

I have not had the opportunity to see, feel, smell or taste a Froglight, so I can't help you there. I will bring a few fixtures that I have on my truck though.

Dreams To Designs
04-09-2006, 08:27 AM
Travis, if you can, get your hands on some Focus fixtures. They make a great compliment to Cast & Kichler. Cast has a wide variety, sometimes to many, of excellent fixtures and a range of small bullet type fixtures also. Most of the major manufacturers put out a good product and mixing and matching to create truly unique installations is all part of good design. If you use a fixture that is intended for the purpose you are using it, rather than adapting a fixture to try and make it work, you will find it easier and more rewarding.

Kirk

Travisty
04-09-2006, 09:23 PM
That makes sense I will take a look at those. Great posts by the way.
I like being a part of this community that really cares about the business.
It helps me out a lot to be able to reference and get advice from the pros''''

:clapping: