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View Full Version : what to use BESIDES black plastic edging?


The Curious Porpoise
04-05-2006, 12:22 AM
i just did my first job using that cheap black plastic edging and as i suspected, it is a horrible product and ends up looking totally unprofessional. My policy is to never use that stuff again. when my customers ask for alternatives-what do i tell them? i know one alternative is to go w/ no edging material-just use a bed edger to give the turf a clean cut around a mulched bed, but what about the customer who wants something tangible to create a definitive border between the turf and the bed? What edging borders do you offer? what are the pros and cons of each different material?

thanks in advance

G.M.Landscaping
04-05-2006, 12:34 AM
If the customer needs an edging I use the one posted here. That black plastic edging is the worst. Every new customer I pick up that has the black edging I talk them into removing it. I give all my beds the clean cut edge(bededger).
I've used this block at a few jobs and it looks decent.

54564

AGLA
04-05-2006, 07:34 AM
I'm with you Porp, a nicely cut edge is the best. I'd rather see plastic than those blocks, but would not use either. If an edge material is a must, metal is clean and effective. Neither plastic or block is in any demand in my area, so the issue does not come up.

MarcSmith
04-05-2006, 07:38 AM
I have used the bed edger to keep a clean edge, but I also have used the steel edging that come in 8 and 16' lengths. They sell it at HD around here, but I can also get it from Shemins or just about any re-wholesaler

Richard Martin
04-05-2006, 08:09 AM
Like MarcSmith said, the steel edging is the best.

kris
04-05-2006, 08:18 AM
We give them 4 options ... shovel cut edge, professional grade poly, metal, or paver. The paver is by far the most popular.

That block shown in the pic would be a nightmare IMO.

Grassmechanic
04-05-2006, 10:28 AM
Either steel or Aluminum is the only edging I'll install if they don't want a natural cut edge. I agree with Kris, that block would be a nightmare.

chriscraft
04-05-2006, 10:59 PM
We are going almost all natural with a bed edger this year. but we will do some metal also and never palstic. With all the freezes and thaws in michigan it pops up over time looking terrible and the mowers can cut it up easily if you go to close

Helpless in Lombard
04-05-2006, 11:21 PM
I hate the plastic and most customers do to. But its the cheapest. Has anyone used that straight plastic edge? I think I saw it in a Menards ad.

LB1234
04-05-2006, 11:42 PM
we use 4" x 16' lengths of either black or silver aluminum edging. Works well for flexibility, seems to stand the test of time, looks good. It is pricey but it works well for informal mulch/stone pathways.

sheshovel
04-05-2006, 11:52 PM
cant you guys get that thick PVC it's at least an inch thick and bends and lasts forever.looks like this..and runs 14.95..for a 20' lenght..it's great

LB1234
04-05-2006, 11:55 PM
cant you guys get that thick PVC it's at least an inch thick and bends and lasts forever.looks like this..and runs 14.95..for a 20' lenght..it's great


Where the heck can I get that? I'm paying in the upper twentys lower thirtys per 16'....have a name for it, website, anything?

Dirty Water
04-06-2006, 01:05 AM
Sheshovel, that almost looks like Trex Decking material.

I'm a big fan of using Trex for borders, last forever, and looks good.

Landscape25
04-06-2006, 02:13 PM
She Shovel,

Do you have to use a base for a path like that? I am curious about the process, I haven't gotten into that kind of thing yet. Also are the small stones around cemented in somehow?

sheshovel
04-06-2006, 03:28 PM
It's made of PVC it's 3"or 4" wide X 1 " THICK AND 20" LONG.comes in two different colors of brown.Sorry I get it from my hardwarestore,rock supplier and my irrigation supplier carries it also..so don't know the website but I can try to find out who makes it for you.
I used a 4" base of small crushed compacted with 2" sand on top
and the pebbles to finish..no the pebbles are loose but you could probably put them in with polysand and they would "cement"in.The Flag does not move at all or tip when stepped on because I installed them nice and tight.The stones should be colser together but I was on a tight buget and had to make them last.

Brendan Smith
04-06-2006, 05:17 PM
for some reason alot of older people around here want these ridiculous looking trenches around their beds. they are about 3" deep and a foot or so wide, just naked earth. then they want the bare dirt trimmed every time so that no runners get into the beds. looks like crap imo and is a pain to trim. i always bid these high and/or try to talk them into something more conventional, but it seldom works :(

Landscape25
04-06-2006, 11:35 PM
Thanks Sheshovel, I suppose you have to use a gas powered compactor as opposed to one of those hand tamping square things, especially for a path that large. I could probably handle that, I guess you have to hammer the flagstone into the crushed concrete with a rubber mallet or something to keep it from wobbling. It's a nice look, not sure if I could get flagstone here though, but I would guess the same principals apply with any path.

sheshovel
04-06-2006, 11:39 PM
Nope hand tamped it.Packed the sand around each with the end of my hammer..then packed in the pebbles around them too..they don't move..saftey 1st when it comes to a pathway

sheshovel
04-06-2006, 11:46 PM
Heres a better pic of the edging..it should be a bit higher..held in with stakes of the same material screwed into the edging once in place

Travel'n Trees
04-07-2006, 12:56 AM
Steel edging? I remember that how many years ago? How about a cobblestone,or holland brick border, with black 4 mil plastic under it to prevent weeds wou can put a push mower wheel on it or weed eat on. If it settles small repair. Hollands cost less than plastic edging.

Mr. Vern
04-07-2006, 02:50 AM
We offer two basic edging materials. If the customer likes the smooth, seemless, non visible transition we use the poly bender board that Sheshovel mentioned. We usually get the 1/2" or 1/4" thickness because it is much easier to work with and is less visible. If the customer likes a visible border we install extruded curbing (commonly referred to as "mow strips") with our curb machine. This can vary in look from plain gray to stamped and colored to meet the customer's needs. I don't like most of the edging materials that people use such as brick or pavers because they are all so choppy and homeowner looking. The poly bender board is made of the same stuff as the Trex decking and is a really good product that produces a professional look. Around here you can only get it at a lumber yard.

korelandscaping
04-07-2006, 07:23 PM
Can you post a pic of the poly bender board. I've never seen nor heard of anything like that around here. I'm doing a job within the next two weeks and need to seperate a rock driveway from grass. The property already has 450 belgium blocks and I'm adding another 210 around the beds. The stone driveway that we are bordering goes to a large garage in the back yard that is used seldomly. I don't want to use metal because I'm sure it will bend when a car drives over it and I don't want to use plastic...this poly bender might be an option?

sheshovel
04-07-2006, 07:26 PM
That's whats in my pics

kris
04-07-2006, 07:38 PM
If the customer likes a visible border we install extruded curbing (commonly referred to as "mow strips") with our curb machine. This can vary in look from plain gray to stamped and colored to meet the customer's needs. I don't like most of the edging materials that people use such as brick or pavers because they are all so choppy and homeowner looking.

See, I have a total different opinion ... I think that concrete curbing is crap and our paver edge installs dont choppy or homeowner produced

kris
04-07-2006, 07:39 PM
cant see it very well in this but same site...post some of your curb installs vern .

Mr. Vern
04-07-2006, 11:48 PM
See, I have a total different opinion ... I think that concrete curbing is crap and our paver edge installs dont choppy or homeowner produced

Kris - we are talking about 2 different products. The pictures you showed look excellent! I am talking about the 9"-15" edging pieces that I thought we were talking about(I realize that I typed "pavers", but was not thinking of pavers, more like precast concrete edging). They are usually stood up on edge along the border and look like crap in my opinion. The stuff in your picture looks to be paver stones. If so, then I really like the look. We can achieve the same look with our curbing machine and I guarantee the average passerby will not be able to notice the difference. I agree that if you lay pavers on the proper base and do things right that they are a higer end product, but as far as the visual appearance, most people can not tell the difference and those who can have to look closely to see it. We can stamp our curbs to get some amazing effects. We also have a slant curb that is visible from the street and becomes an accent point in the landscape. I have seen some crappy looking curb jobs, but I have seen crappy paver jobs too. If curbing is done right, it is a very cost effective method of obtaining a nice custom look that will last for many years; and is affordable to the average home owner. That said, I will never knock a properly done paver job - it is definitely higher end in my opion. We are doing our home show this weekend, so I will try to get some pictures of some of our sample curbs before the weekend is over. If not I will dig out some and post them next week.